5

I couldn't find this online but basically I have a string like this:

s = "name={0},
address={1},
nickname={2},
age={3},
comments=
"""
{4}
"""
"

and I need to format this string as is using variables like so:

s.format("alice", "N/A", "alice", 18, "missing person")

I can't change the triple quotes there because the program that will use my string expects that, otherwise won't work.

How can I have this string declared/escaped correctly?

8

You could use triple single quotes for the string:

s = '''name={0},
address={1},
nickname={2},
age={3},
comments=
"""
{4}
"""
'''

print s.format("alice", "N/A", "alice", 18, "missing person")

Output:

name=alice,
address=N/A,
nickname=alice,
age=18,
comments=
"""
missing person
"""
  • 1
    Thanks this works great. But for some reason the actual text I am using seem to get tabs for every line. Is this normal? If I add name to a new line that happens for that line i.e. it gets a tab in the beginning. If I put it in the same line as ''' then this doesn't happen for that line, so it's good but the other lines still start with tabs for some reason. – Joan Venge Jun 17 '16 at 4:49
  • 2
    @JoanVenge ''' preserves all white space. If you start the text from following line the text will have \n at beginning. Similarly if you intend the text white space will be there as well. – niemmi Jun 17 '16 at 4:55
  • Thanks a lot. This is the string I am using: paste.ofcode.org/5uBdzf32hy5BZ7DdrRpYKE I don't understand why I am getting tabs really. All I am doing is use format and print the result. – Joan Venge Jun 17 '16 at 4:58
  • 1
    @JoanVenge I addressed the problem of indentation showing up inside the literal in my answer. – Kevin J. Chase Jun 17 '16 at 4:59
  • 1
    @JoanVenge If you're using the text exactly as in the link you provided I don't understand why it's happening. Could you double check your code that it's not intended at all? Also check Kevin's answer, it covers the issue well. – niemmi Jun 17 '16 at 5:09
7

You can escape triple-quotes inside a string the same way you can escape any other quote character, with a \:

s = """name={0},
address={1},
nickname={2},
age={3},
comments=
\"\"\"
{4}
\"\"\"
"""

Strictly speaking, you only have to escape one of the " characters --- enough to prevent a triple """ from appearing --- but I find escaping all three makes my intent more clear.

Later...

sf = s.format("alice", "N/A", "alice", 18, "missing person")
print(sf)
print('----')
print(repr(sf))

...produces:

name=alice,
address=N/A,
nickname=alice,
age=18,
comments=
"""
missing person
"""

----
'name=alice,\naddress=N/A,\nnickname=alice,\nage=18,\ncomments=\n"""\nmissing person\n"""\n'

niemmi's answer works, but only if you don't have a mix of ''' and """ triple-quotes inside the string. Escaping the quote characters with a backslash always works.

Annoyance #1: Trailing Newline

I printed the row of dashes to highlight that s has preserved the newline between the last three escaped quote characters and the triple quotes that actually ended the string. To remove it from the literal:

s = """[as before...]
\"\"\"
{4}
\"\"\""""

Annoyance #2: Indentations Preserved Inside Literal

The second and following lines of the s literal must be flush against the first (left-hand) column. Triple-quoted strings neatly lined up inside an indented block:

def indents_appear_in_string_literal():
    # This looks good but doesn't work right.
    s = """name={0},
    address={1},
    nickname={2},
    age={3},
    comments=
    \"\"\"
    {4}
    \"\"\"
    """
    sf = s.format("alice", "N/A", "alice", 18, "missing person")
    print(sf)
    print('----')
    print(repr(sf))
    return

...will preserve the indentations inside the literal:

name=alice,
    address=N/A,
    nickname=alice,
    age=18,
    comments=
    """
    missing person
    """

----
'name=alice,\n    address=N/A,\n    nickname=alice,\n    age=18,\n    comments=\n    """\n    missing person\n    """\n    '
1

You can use @niemmi's approach, which works perfectly well. You can also add a backward slash at the end of each line to indicate you're going to continue on the next line:

s = 'name={0},\
address={1},\
nickname={2},\
age={3},\
comments=\
"""\
{4}\
"""\
'

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