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In a database containing several hundreds of thousands of names (separated on firstnames and lastnames), is there a way to perform analysis to identify uncommon names? The purposes is to produce test data that represents a the full width of ways names can be written.

I guess there's many ways to define uncommon, so what I'm looking for here are both ideas for what to look for, and how to find them. For instance, have people included their title in their name? Non-ascii characters? Leading whitespace? Do people have several first names? Last names? etc.

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    What is your definition of uncommon?On what basis you want to separate uncommon names with common ones? Jun 17 '16 at 9:44
  • You can always do a GROUP BY and a COUNT for a literal interpretation of "uncommon" (as in, "does not occur frequently"). If you mean unusual, that's entirely subjective. Jun 17 '16 at 10:30
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I had a very similar requirement in a previous job (but only based on surnames, not all names). I haven't got the exact code any more, but roughly how it was implemented was:

A task ran at an interval (monthly I think) to analyse the surnames currently in the DB. It would look at the total number of records, and then the number of occurences of each surname. In the settings table was a value which defined the % at which we felt a name to be uncommon. It may have been <0.1% I think, but you must use your own definition.

Based on those factors, the job would then dump a list of surnames currently defined as "uncommon" into a table. The rest of the software then used this table whenever it wanted to know if a surname was uncommon. (Also, if a surname did not occur in the DB at all, it would also be treated as uncommon).

I'm sure there are flaws in this method from a scientific point of view, but it served the purpose we needed at the time, and because it re-analysed the data automatically at regular intervals, there was no manual maintenance of the list required.

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  • Of course none of this dealt with problems of spelling mistakes etc, which you may or may not need to factor into your own solution.
    – ADyson
    Jun 17 '16 at 10:34
  • this is an interesting approach, could be combined with other edge-case type analysis' for continously monitoring the state of test data. I'll have a go at adopting this some time. Thanks for your feedback! Jun 17 '16 at 11:15
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You can use the below (informal) query and keep extend/Customize it based your need,

SELECT  *
FROM    ( SELECT    'LeadingWhiteSpaces' AS Flaw ,
                    *
          FROM      Emp
          WHERE     FirstName <> LTRIM(RTRIM(FirstName))
          UNION
          SELECT    'Non-ASCII' AS Flaw ,
                    *
          FROM      Emp
          WHERE     FirstName LIKE '%[^a-z ,-.^0-9]%'
          UNION
          SELECT    'TitlesInName' AS Flaw ,
                    *
          FROM      Emp
          WHERE     LTRIM(RTRIM(FirstName)) LIKE 'MR.%'
                    OR LTRIM(RTRIM(FirstName)) LIKE 'MRs.%'
                    OR LTRIM(RTRIM(FirstName)) LIKE 'Jr.%'
          UNION
          SELECT    'SeveralFirstNames' AS Flaw ,
                    *
          FROM      Emp
          WHERE     LTRIM(RTRIM(FirstName)) LIKE '% %'
        ) A
ORDER BY Flaw
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