1

Consider the following code:

var path = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory;
var filePath = Path.Combine(path, "test1.pdf");

using (var stream = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.ReadWrite))
using (var document = new Document(new Rectangle(PageSize.A4.Width, PageSize.A4.Height)))
using (var writer = PdfWriter.GetInstance(document, stream))
{

    try
    {

        document.Open();

        const string value = "The quick brown fox";

        for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        {

            var chunk = new Chunk(value);

            chunk.SetCharacterSpacing(i);

            var origin = new Phrase(chunk);
            var paragraph1 = new Paragraph(origin);

            document.Add(paragraph1);

            var widthPoint = chunk.GetWidthPoint();

            Debug.WriteLine(widthPoint);

        }

        writer.CloseStream = false;

    }
    finally
    {
        document.Close();
        stream.Close();
    }

}

I am attempting to add a paragraph/chunk to a single PdfPCell in a new PdfPTable. We have no control over the actual text going into the cells, and it is possible the text will be a little longer that the available space. Either the text would break onto multiple lines or flow out of the cell and be hidden.

The idea is to automatically reduce the letter-spacing of the text (up to a minimum amount) in order to try and mitigate the text being cropped. Basically apply a small negative letter spacing until the text fits. The issue is the value of widthPoint is always the same, no matter the letter-spacing applied. The PDF generated clearly has the text rendered with different widths.

Is there a way to calculate the actual width of the text with letter-spacing, or it's container? The chunk / paragraph are (what I would describe as) box-model type elements. That is to say they fill the cell and always have the same width.

No idea how to proceed.

This is for iTextSharp version 5.5.9.0

2

Simply said: You are correct. Chunk.GetWidthPoint() only calculates the width without character or word spacing:

virtual public float GetWidthPoint() {
    if (GetImage() != null) {
        return GetImage().ScaledWidth;
    }
    return font.GetCalculatedBaseFont(true).GetWidthPoint(Content, font.CalculatedSize) * HorizontalScaling;
} 

Thus,

Is there a way to calculate the actual width of the text with letter-spacing, or it's container?

There is none provided by iTextSharp 5 out of the box. But you can easily calculate the correct value like this:

float WidthWithCharSpacing = chunk.GetWidthPoint() + chunk.GetCharacterSpacing() * (chunk.Content.Length - 1);
  • Honestly, I could have sworn I tried that! GAH! Thanks. – Ed Broome Jun 21 '16 at 22:28
1

You may be looking for the GetWidthPointKerned method which takes into account the Kerning between characters.

  • Kerning is not character spacing which the question is all about. – mkl Jan 18 '17 at 8:20
  • I am not sure what you mean according to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerning it says "In typography, kerning is the process of adjusting the spacing between characters in a proportional font" if you want to get the string width including spacing between letters 'GetWidthPointKerned; does work, or at least has for me. @Mkl could you elaborate? – Sam Plus Plus Jan 18 '17 at 15:37
  • If you continue reading the article you'll find that in digital typography, kerning is usually applied to letter pairs which indeed is what your proposed GetWidthPointKerned method considers: Small changes in the space between letters based on the individual letter pair. As you can see in the OP's code, though, he uses chunk.SetCharacterSpacing(i) which changes the space between each pair of letters by a constant value, independent of the letters in question, and your proposed GetWidthPointKerned method ignores this character spacing. – mkl Jan 18 '17 at 22:37
  • So while character spacing might abstractly also belong to kerning in the broad sense, in PDF content instructions and in particular in iText method names they are separate entities. – mkl Jan 18 '17 at 22:39
  • @mlk thank you for the clarification, while I can see your point, I think this dialog has valuable information in it as well for others that search not directly to op. – Sam Plus Plus Jan 19 '17 at 2:26

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