416

Which is better to use, and why, on a large project:

#if DEBUG
    public void SetPrivateValue(int value)
    { ... }
#endif

or

[System.Diagnostics.Conditional("DEBUG")]
public void SetPrivateValue(int value)
{ ... }
558

It really depends on what you're going for:

  • #if DEBUG: The code in here won't even reach the IL on release.
  • [Conditional("DEBUG")]: This code will reach the IL, however calls to the method will be omitted unless DEBUG is set when the caller is compiled.

Personally I use both depending on the situation:

Conditional("DEBUG") Example: I use this so that I don't have to go back and edit my code later during release, but during debugging I want to be sure I didn't make any typos. This function checks that I type a property name correctly when trying to use it in my INotifyPropertyChanged stuff.

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
[DebuggerStepThrough]
protected void VerifyPropertyName(String propertyName)
{
    if (TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(this)[propertyName] == null)
        Debug.Fail(String.Format("Invalid property name. Type: {0}, Name: {1}",
            GetType(), propertyName));
}

You really don't want to create a function using #if DEBUG unless you are willing to wrap every call to that function with the same #if DEBUG:

#if DEBUG
    public void DoSomething() { }
#endif

    public void Foo()
    {
#if DEBUG
        DoSomething(); //This works, but looks FUGLY
#endif
    }

versus:

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
public void DoSomething() { }

public void Foo()
{
    DoSomething(); //Code compiles and is cleaner, DoSomething always
                   //exists, however this is only called during DEBUG.
}

#if DEBUG example: I use this when trying to setup different bindings for WCF communication.

#if DEBUG
        public const String ENDPOINT = "Localhost";
#else
        public const String ENDPOINT = "BasicHttpBinding";
#endif

In the first example, the code all exists, but is just ignored unless DEBUG is on. In the second example, the const ENDPOINT is set to "Localhost" or "BasicHttpBinding" depending on if DEBUG is set or not.


Update: I am updating this answer to clarify an important and tricky point. If you choose to use the ConditionalAttribute, keep in mind that calls are omitted during compilation, and not runtime. That is:

MyLibrary.dll

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
public void A()
{
    Console.WriteLine("A");
    B();
}

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
public void B()
{
    Console.WriteLine("B");
}

When the library is compiled against release mode (i.e. no DEBUG symbol), it will forever have the call to B() from within A() omitted, even if a call to A() is included because DEBUG is defined in the calling assembly.

  • 12
    The #if Debug for DoSomething doesn't need to have all the calling statements surrounded by #if DEBUG. you can either 1: just #if DEBUG the inside of DoSomething, or, do a #else with a blank definition of DoSomething. Still your comment helped my understand the difference, but #if DEBUG need not be as ugly as you've demonstrated. – Apeiron Oct 25 '11 at 19:31
  • 3
    If you just #if DEBUG the contents, the JIT may still include a call to the function when your code runs in a non-debug build. Using the Conditional attribute means the JIT knows not to even output the callsite when in a non-DEBUG build. – Jeff Yates Sep 11 '13 at 4:11
  • 2
    @JeffYates: I don't see how what you are writing is any different than what I explained. – m-y Sep 11 '13 at 17:19
  • 1
    @Apeiron if you only have the function content in the #if debug then the function call is still added to the call stack, while this is usually not very important, adding the declaration and the function call to the #if means the compiler behaves as if function doesn't exist, so m-y's method is the more "correct" way of using #if. though both methods produce results that are indistinguishable from each other in normal use – MikeT Oct 9 '14 at 15:08
  • 5
    if anyone's wondering, IL = Intermediate Language - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Intermediate_Language – jbyrd Jun 2 '17 at 18:52
63

Well, it's worth noting that they don't mean the same thing at all.

If the DEBUG symbol isn't defined, then in the first case the SetPrivateValue itself won't be called... whereas in the second case it will exist, but any callers who are compiled without the DEBUG symbol will have those calls omitted.

If the code and all its callers are in the same assembly this difference is less important - but it means that in the first case you also need to have #if DEBUG around the calling code as well.

Personally I'd recommend the second approach - but you do need to keep the difference between them clear in your head.

  • 5
    +1 for calling code will need to have #if statements as well. Which means there will be a proliferation of #if statements... – Lucas B Sep 24 '10 at 15:53
  • While the second option (Conditional attribute) is nicer and cleaner in some cases, it may be needed to communicate the fact that a method call would be stripped from the assembly during compilation (by a naming convention, for example). – lysergic-acid Dec 18 '14 at 8:16
43

I'm sure plenty will disagree with me, but having spent time as a build guy constantly hearing "But it works on my machine!", I take the standpoint that you should pretty much never use either. If you really need something for testing and debugging, figure out a way to make that testability seperate from the actual production code.

Abstract the scenarios with mocking in unit tests, make one off versions of things for one off scenarios you want to test, but don't put tests for debug into the code for binaries which you test and write for production release. These debug tests just hide possible bugs from devs so they aren't found until later in the process.

  • 4
    I totally agree with you Jimmy. If you're using DI and mocking for your tests, why would you need #if debug or any similar construct in your code? – Richard Everett Sep 24 '10 at 16:18
  • @RichardEv There may be a better way to handle this, but I am currently using it to allow myself to play the part of different users via a query string. I don't want this in production but I do want it for debugging so I can control the workflow that is stepped through without having to create multiple users and login to both accounts to walk through the flow. Though this is the first time I've actually had to use it. – Tony Jul 23 '13 at 15:55
  • 4
    Rather than just for testing, we often do things like setting a default recipient email to ourselves, in debug builds, using #if DEBUG so that we do not accidentally spam others while testing a system that must transmit emails as part of the process. Sometimes these are the right tools for the job :) – Gone Coding Nov 21 '13 at 14:26
  • 6
    I would generally agree with you but if you are in a situation where performance is paramount then you don't want to clutter the code with extraneous logging and user output, but i do 100% agree that they shouldn't ever be used to alter the fundamental behavior – MikeT Oct 9 '14 at 15:12
  • 5
    -1 There's nothing wrong with using either of these. Claiming unit tests and DI somehow replaces a debug enabled build of a product is naive. – Ted Bigham Apr 18 '17 at 17:11
13

This one can be useful as well:

if (Debugger.IsAttached)
{
...
}
  • Personally, I don't see how this can be useful compared to the other 2 alternatives. This guarantees that the whole block is compiled, and Debugger.IsAttached must be called at runtime even in release builds. – Jai Nov 12 at 2:01
9

With the first example, SetPrivateValue won't exist in the build if DEBUG is not defined, with the second example, calls to SetPrivateValue won't exist in the build if DEBUG is not defined.

With the first example, you'll have to wrap any calls to SetPrivateValue with #if DEBUG as well.

With the second example, the calls to SetPrivateValue will be omitted, but be aware that SetPrivateValue itself will still be compiled. This is useful if you're building a library, so an application referencing your library can still use your function (if the condition is met).

If you want to omit the calls and save the space of the callee, you could use a combination of the two techniques:

[System.Diagnostics.Conditional("DEBUG")]
public void SetPrivateValue(int value){
    #if DEBUG
    // method body here
    #endif
}
  • @P Daddy: Wrapping #if DEBUG around Conditional("DEBUG") does not remove the calls to that function, it just removes the function from IL alltogether, so you're still having calls to function that doesn't exist (compilation errors). – m-y Sep 24 '10 at 16:15
  • If one doesn't want the code to exist in release, should one wrap the method body in "#if DEBUG", possibly with an "#else" stub (with a throw or dummy return value), and use the attribute to suggest that callers not bother with the call? That would seem the best of both worlds. – supercat Sep 24 '10 at 17:05
  • @myermian, @supercat: Yes, you are both right. My mistake. I'll edit as per supercat's suggestion. – P Daddy Sep 24 '10 at 17:12
4

Let's presume your code also had an #else statement which defined a null stub function, addressing one of Jon Skeet's points. There's a second important distinction between the two.

Suppose the #if DEBUG or Conditional function exists in a DLL which is referenced by your main project executable. Using the #if, the evaluation of the conditional will be performed with regard to the library's compilation settings. Using the Conditional attribute, the evaluation of the conditional will be performed with regard to the compilation settings of the invoker.

2

I have a SOAP WebService extension to log network traffic using a custom [TraceExtension]. I use this only for Debug builds and omit from Release builds. Use the #if DEBUG to wrap the [TraceExtension] attribute thus removing it from Release builds.

#if DEBUG
[TraceExtension]
#endif
[System.Web.Service.Protocols.SoapDocumentMethodAttribute( ... )]
[ more attributes ...]
public DatabaseResponse[] GetDatabaseResponse( ...) 
{
    object[] results = this.Invoke("GetDatabaseResponse",new object[] {
          ... parmeters}};
}

#if DEBUG
[TraceExtension]
#endif
public System.IAsyncResult BeginGetDatabaseResponse(...)

#if DEBUG
[TraceExtension]
#endif
public DatabaseResponse[] EndGetDatabaseResponse(...)
0

Usually you would need it in Program.cs where you want to decide to run either Debug on Non-Debug code and that too mostly in Windows Services. So I created a readonly field IsDebugMode and set its value in static constructor as shown below.

static class Program
{

    #region Private variable
    static readonly bool IsDebugMode = false;
    #endregion Private variable

    #region Constrcutors
    static Program()
    {
 #if DEBUG
        IsDebugMode = true;
 #endif
    }
    #endregion

    #region Main

    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        if (IsDebugMode)
        {
            MyService myService = new MyService(args);
            myService.OnDebug();             
        }
        else
        {
            ServiceBase[] services = new ServiceBase[] { new MyService (args) };
            services.Run(args);
        }
    }

    #endregion Main        
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.