81

What is the new syntax for dispatch_once in Swift after the changes made in language version 3? The old version was as follows.

var token: dispatch_once_t = 0
func test() {
    dispatch_once(&token) {
    }
}

These are the changes to libdispatch that were made.

64
0

From the doc:

Dispatch
The free function dispatch_once is no longer available in Swift. In Swift, you can use lazily initialized globals or static properties and get the same thread-safety and called-once guarantees as dispatch_once provided. Example:

let myGlobal: () = { … global contains initialization in a call to a closure … }()
_ = myGlobal  // using myGlobal will invoke the initialization code only the first time it is used.
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    It's not as if you didn't know that Swift would be changing rapidly and you would have to correct a lot of broken code between versions of Swift. – Abizern Oct 13 '16 at 10:32
  • 2
    the biggest pain is the 3rd party pods which are not always Swift3 compatible. – Tinkerbell Oct 13 '16 at 13:00
  • 4
    That's the technical debt you accrue when introducing third party dependencies, @Tinkerbell. I love Swift but am extra cautious bringing in external dependencies that use it for this very reason. – Chris Wagner Oct 14 '16 at 17:50
  • 15
    dispatch_once was clear. This, unfortunately, is ugly and confusing.. – Alexandre G Oct 19 '18 at 2:23
101
0

While using lazy initialized globals can make sense for some one time initialization, it doesn't make sense for other types. It makes a lot of sense to use lazy initialized globals for things like singletons, it doesn't make a lot of sense for things like guarding a swizzle setup.

Here is a Swift 3 style implementation of dispatch_once:

public extension DispatchQueue {

    private static var _onceTracker = [String]()

    /**
     Executes a block of code, associated with a unique token, only once.  The code is thread safe and will
     only execute the code once even in the presence of multithreaded calls.

     - parameter token: A unique reverse DNS style name such as com.vectorform.<name> or a GUID
     - parameter block: Block to execute once
     */
    public class func once(token: String, block:@noescape(Void)->Void) {
        objc_sync_enter(self); defer { objc_sync_exit(self) }

        if _onceTracker.contains(token) {
            return
        }

        _onceTracker.append(token)
        block()
    }
}

Here is an example usage:

DispatchQueue.once(token: "com.vectorform.test") {
    print( "Do This Once!" )
}

or using a UUID

private let _onceToken = NSUUID().uuidString

DispatchQueue.once(token: _onceToken) {
    print( "Do This Once!" )
}

As we are currently in a time of transition from swift 2 to 3, here is an example swift 2 implementation:

public class Dispatch
{
    private static var _onceTokenTracker = [String]()

    /**
     Executes a block of code, associated with a unique token, only once.  The code is thread safe and will
     only execute the code once even in the presence of multithreaded calls.

     - parameter token: A unique reverse DNS style name such as com.vectorform.<name> or a GUID
     - parameter block: Block to execute once
     */
    public class func once(token token: String, @noescape block:dispatch_block_t) {
        objc_sync_enter(self); defer { objc_sync_exit(self) }

        if _onceTokenTracker.contains(token) {
            return
        }

        _onceTokenTracker.append(token)
        block()
    }

}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you very much for the solution. I was exactly getting trapped in a swizzle setup. I hope the swift team address this use case. – salman140 Sep 29 '16 at 19:20
  • 2
    You absolutely should not be using objc_sync_enter and objc_sync_exit anymore. – smat88dd Nov 8 '17 at 23:26
  • 1
    And why is that? – Tod Cunningham Nov 15 '17 at 20:37
  • 1
    For performance you should use a set instead of an array for the _onceTrackers. This improves the time complexity from O(N) to O(1). – Werner Altewischer Dec 8 '17 at 14:12
  • 2
    So you write a reusable class assuming it won't be reused that much :-) If it requires no additional effort to lower the time complexity from O(N) to O(1) you should always do it IMHO. – Werner Altewischer Oct 26 '19 at 12:13
60
0

Expanding on Tod Cunningham's answer above, I've added another method which makes the token automatically from file, function, and line.

public extension DispatchQueue {
    private static var _onceTracker = [String]()

    public class func once(file: String = #file,
                           function: String = #function,
                           line: Int = #line,
                           block: () -> Void) {
        let token = "\(file):\(function):\(line)"
        once(token: token, block: block)
    }

    /**
     Executes a block of code, associated with a unique token, only once.  The code is thread safe and will
     only execute the code once even in the presence of multithreaded calls.

     - parameter token: A unique reverse DNS style name such as com.vectorform.<name> or a GUID
     - parameter block: Block to execute once
     */
    public class func once(token: String,
                           block: () -> Void) {
        objc_sync_enter(self)
        defer { objc_sync_exit(self) }

        guard !_onceTracker.contains(token) else { return }

        _onceTracker.append(token)
        block()
    }
}

So it can be simpler to call:

DispatchQueue.once {
    setupUI()
}

and you can still specify a token if you wish:

DispatchQueue.once(token: "com.hostname.project") {
    setupUI()
}

I suppose you could get a collision if you have the same file in two modules. Too bad there isn't #module

| improve this answer | |
18
0

Edit

@Frizlab's answer - this solution is not guaranteed to be thread-safe. An alternative should be used if this is crucial

Simple solution is

lazy var dispatchOnce : Void  = { // or anyName I choose

    self.title = "Hello Lazy Guy"

    return
}()

used like

override func viewDidLayoutSubviews() {
    super.viewDidLayoutSubviews()
    _ = dispatchOnce
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This doesn't help at all, because a lazy var declaration cannot be made inline with regular code, it has to be in a struct or class definition. That means the contents of the dispatchOnce cannot capture surrounding scope of an instance. For example if you declare a closure that has not run yet, you cannot then declare the struct inside that closure and have the lazy var's contents be another closure that captures vars from the surrounding closure... – CommaToast Jul 24 '17 at 19:56
  • 3
    Downvoted because this code has definitely not the same semantics as dispatch_once. dispatch_once ensures the code is run exactly once, whichever thread you call it from. Lazy vars have undefined behavior in a multi-threaded environment. – Frizlab Aug 8 '17 at 9:34
  • in this solution init block is going to call twice in some cases – sacred Oct 22 '18 at 10:49
8
0

You can still use it if you add a bridging header:

typedef dispatch_once_t mxcl_dispatch_once_t;
void mxcl_dispatch_once(mxcl_dispatch_once_t *predicate, dispatch_block_t block);

Then in a .m somewhere:

void mxcl_dispatch_once(mxcl_dispatch_once_t *predicate, dispatch_block_t block) {
    dispatch_once(predicate, block);
}

You should now be able to use mxcl_dispatch_once from Swift.

Mostly you should use what Apple suggest instead, but I had some legitimate uses where I needed to dispatch_once with a single token in two functions and there is not covered by what Apple provide instead.

| improve this answer | |
7
0

You can declare a top-level variable function like this:

private var doOnce: ()->() = {
    /* do some work only once per instance */
    return {}
}()

then call this anywhere:

doOnce()
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Lazy vars are scoped to the class, so this absolutely will not act like dispatch_once. It will execute once per instance of the underlying class. Either move it outside the class [ private var doOnce: ()->() = { } ] or mark it static [ static private var doOnce: ()->() = { } ] – Eli Burke Jul 31 '18 at 15:17
  • 1
    Absolutely correct! Thanks. In most cases you'll need once action per instance. – Bogdan Novikov Aug 9 '18 at 11:09
  • 2
    This is a really great solution! Elegant, short, and clear – Ben Leggiero Jan 22 '19 at 19:18
6
0

Swift 3: For those who likes reusable classes (or structures):

public final class /* struct */ DispatchOnce {
   private var lock: OSSpinLock = OS_SPINLOCK_INIT
   private var isInitialized = false
   public /* mutating */ func perform(block: (Void) -> Void) {
      OSSpinLockLock(&lock)
      if !isInitialized {
         block()
         isInitialized = true
      }
      OSSpinLockUnlock(&lock)
   }
}

Usage:

class MyViewController: UIViewController {

   private let /* var */ setUpOnce = DispatchOnce()

   override func viewWillAppear() {
      super.viewWillAppear()
      setUpOnce.perform {
         // Do some work here
         // ...
      }
   }

}

Update (28 April 2017): OSSpinLock replaced with os_unfair_lock due deprecation warnings in macOS SDK 10.12.

public final class /* struct */ DispatchOnce {
   private var lock = os_unfair_lock()
   private var isInitialized = false
   public /* mutating */ func perform(block: (Void) -> Void) {
      os_unfair_lock_lock(&lock)
      if !isInitialized {
         block()
         isInitialized = true
      }
      os_unfair_lock_unlock(&lock)
   }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I get a message that OSSSpinLock is deprecated in iOS 10.0 – markhorrocks Apr 28 '17 at 10:15
  • 2
    Thanks! Example code updated. OSSpinLock replaced with os_unfair_lock. BTW: Here is a good WWDC video about Concurrent Programming: developer.apple.com/videos/play/wwdc2016/720 – Vlad Apr 28 '17 at 15:30
0
0

I improve above answers get result:

import Foundation
extension DispatchQueue {
    private static var _onceTracker = [AnyHashable]()

    ///only excute once in same file&&func&&line
    public class func onceInLocation(file: String = #file,
                           function: String = #function,
                           line: Int = #line,
                           block: () -> Void) {
        let token = "\(file):\(function):\(line)"
        once(token: token, block: block)
    }

    ///only excute once in same Variable
    public class func onceInVariable(variable:NSObject, block: () -> Void){
        once(token: variable.rawPointer, block: block)
    }
    /**
     Executes a block of code, associated with a unique token, only once.  The code is thread safe and will
     only execute the code once even in the presence of multithreaded calls.

     - parameter token: A unique reverse DNS style name such as com.vectorform.<name> or a GUID
     - parameter block: Block to execute once
     */
    public class func once(token: AnyHashable,block: () -> Void) {
        objc_sync_enter(self)
        defer { objc_sync_exit(self) }

        guard !_onceTracker.contains(token) else { return }

        _onceTracker.append(token)
        block()
    }

}

extension NSObject {
    public var rawPointer:UnsafeMutableRawPointer? {
        get {
            Unmanaged.passUnretained(self).toOpaque()
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
-3
0

Use the class constant approach if you are using Swift 1.2 or above and the nested struct approach if you need to support earlier versions. An exploration of the Singleton pattern in Swift. All approaches below support lazy initialization and thread safety. dispatch_once approach is not worked in Swift 3.0

Approach A: Class constant

class SingletonA {

    static let sharedInstance = SingletonA()

    init() {
        println("AAA");
    }

}

Approach B: Nested struct

class SingletonB {

    class var sharedInstance: SingletonB {
        struct Static {
            static let instance: SingletonB = SingletonB()
        }
        return Static.instance
    }

}

Approach C: dispatch_once

class SingletonC {

    class var sharedInstance: SingletonC {
        struct Static {
            static var onceToken: dispatch_once_t = 0
            static var instance: SingletonC? = nil
        }
        dispatch_once(&Static.onceToken) {
            Static.instance = SingletonC()
        }
        return Static.instance!
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The question specifically asked about a solution for Swift 3. – thesummersign Jun 2 '17 at 6:41

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