1

I was under the impression that fcntl(fd, F_SETFD, flg ) and flg = fcntl(fd, F_GETFD, flg ) could be used for setting and getting filedescriptor flags.

According to https://community.spiceworks.com/linux/man/2/fcntl, linux should only support the setting of some fd flags. Fair enough. But judging by the output of:

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>

#define XSZ(x) (int)(sizeof(x)*2)
int main(int argc, char** argv){
    int fd, flg;
    if ( (fd = open("/dev/stdout", O_RDWR )) < 0){ perror("open"); return -errno; }

    //get
    if ( (flg = fcntl(fd, F_GETFD)) < 0 ){ perror("setfd"); return -errno; }
    printf("flg=0x%0*x\n", XSZ(flg), flg);

#define ADD_FLAG(FLG) \
    flg |= FLG;\
    printf("setting flg=0x%0*x\n", XSZ(flg), flg);\
    if ( (flg = fcntl(fd, F_SETFD, flg )) ){ perror("setfd"); return -errno; }\
    if ( (flg = fcntl(fd, F_GETFD, flg )) < 0 ){ perror("getfd"); return -errno; }\
    printf("flg=0x%0*x\n\n", XSZ(flg), flg);

    ADD_FLAG(FD_CLOEXEC);
    ADD_FLAG(O_APPEND);
    ADD_FLAG(O_DIRECT);
    ADD_FLAG(O_ASYNC);
    ADD_FLAG(O_NOATIME);

    return 0;
}

being

flg=0x00000000
setting flg=0x00000001
flg=0x00000001

setting flg=0x00000401
flg=0x00000001

setting flg=0x00004001
flg=0x00000001

setting flg=0x00002001
flg=0x00000001

setting flg=0x00040001
flg=0x00000001

It looks like the only settable flag is FD_CLOEXEC. (Weird thing: all the set calls return succesfully).

And it looks to me like the kernel pretty much ignore the arguments to F_SETFD:

https://github.com/torvalds/linux/blob/master/fs/fcntl.c#L259

What's going on here? Am I missing something?

3

The only valid flag for F_SETFD is FD_CLOEXEC; all the others you use are for F_SETFL. Neither Linux nor POSIX specify any error when F_SETFD is passed any values for flags that don't exist, so it is expected that such a situation will not result in an error.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.