0

I'm struggling here with the fact that my div does not overlap de image. When you hover this div (with a opacity of 0) it gets the opacity of 1 after a transition.

The problem is, though, that the div is below the image, while it should be covering the image (hover somewhere below the image to see the problem) (JSFiddle):

.column {
  height: 300px;
  width: 300px;
  position: relative;
}

.overlay {
  background: #ddd;
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  opacity: 0;
}

.overlay {
    opacity: 0;       
    transition: opacity .25s linear; /* vendorless fallback */
    -o-transition: opacity .25s linear; /* opera */
    -ms-transition: opacity .25s linear; /* IE 10 */
    -moz-transition: opacity .25s linear; /* Firefox */
    -webkit-transition: opacity .25s linear; /*safari and chrome */
}

.overlay:hover {
    opacity: .75;
}
<div class="column">
  <img src="http://cdn.welingelichtekringen.nl/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/hond-584x340.jpg">
  <div class="overlay">
    <p>
      I'm some test text!
    </p>
  </div>
</div>

Can anybody help me to make sure the overlay covers the image?

7
  • I thought your question had two parts - (a) the position and (b) cover the image. Is that correct and are you looking for a solution for part b? If yes, I can post an answer. Not sure as you've already accepted one.
    – Harry
    Jun 18 '16 at 12:57
  • @Harry I need that (b) answer of yours, because that image should have some padding as well, but when I give the overlay the properties ``width: 100%; height: 100%; it goes over the padding of the images, what shouldn't be the case..
    – M Zeinstra
    Jun 18 '16 at 13:00
  • Ok, what are the browsers that you need to support? There is a property to get the image to fit the container without having the aspect ratio affected but it is not supported very widely.
    – Harry
    Jun 18 '16 at 13:01
  • @Harry if possible all browsers.. But if that isn't possible then it would like to focus on Firefox, Chrome and if possible IE
    – M Zeinstra
    Jun 18 '16 at 13:02
  • IE (as always) is the problem. This would work in all browsers except IE, will retain your original 300 x 300 dimensions and preserve the aspect ratio of the image.
    – Harry
    Jun 18 '16 at 13:04
3

Modify the css overlay class as:

.overlay {
 background: #ddd;
 position: absolute;
 width: 100%;
 height: 100%;
 opacity: 0;
 left:0;
 top:0; 
}

https://jsfiddle.net/djsreeraj/b0r25gbd/3/

1

You have to set the position:absolute with the properties top:0 and left:0. You can use the following solution:

.column {
  height: 300px;
  width: 300px;
  position: relative;
}
.overlay {
  background: #ddd;
  position: absolute;
  opacity: 0;
  top:0;
  left:0;
  right:0;
  bottom:0;
}
.overlay {
  opacity: 0;       
  transition: opacity .25s linear; /* vendorless fallback */
  -o-transition: opacity .25s linear; /* opera */
  -ms-transition: opacity .25s linear; /* IE 10 */
  -moz-transition: opacity .25s linear; /* Firefox */
  -webkit-transition: opacity .25s linear; /*safari and chrome */
}
.overlay:hover {
  opacity: .75;
}
<div class="column">
  <img src="http://cdn.welingelichtekringen.nl/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/hond-584x340.jpg">
  <div class="overlay">
    <p>I'm some test text!</p>
  </div>
</div>

0
1

You can use the position: absolute method as mentioned above. Also, if you want to change the size of the image accordingly so it scales down fine, use the max-width properties. For example:

.column {
  max-height: 300px;
  max-width: 300px;
  position: relative;
}

.column img {
 max-height: 300px;
 max-width: 100%;
}

.overlay {
  background: #ddd;
  position: absolute;
  opacity: 0;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
}

.overlay {
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
    opacity: 0;       
    transition: opacity .25s linear; /* vendorless fallback */
    -o-transition: opacity .25s linear; /* opera */
    -ms-transition: opacity .25s linear; /* IE 10 */
    -moz-transition: opacity .25s linear; /* Firefox */
    -webkit-transition: opacity .25s linear; /*safari and chrome */
}

.overlay:hover {
    opacity: .75;
}
<div class="column">
  <img src="http://cdn.welingelichtekringen.nl/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/hond-584x340.jpg">
  <div class="overlay">
    <p>
      I'm some test text!
    </p>
  </div>
</div>

1

While parts of your question has been already answered by others (and correctly), I feel they lack the explanation that is required and some of them also address the question only in part.

Firstly, coming to the reason why the overlay was originally positioned below the element and not over the image (despite it having position: absolute) is the following:

  • The element has a width and a height assigned to it but left/right or top/bottom is not specified. When no value is specified for these, the default value (which is auto) is set for them. Then the UA resolves the auto to the actual values during rendering.
  • As per the the Visual Rendering Specs by W3C when height is not auto (here it is 100%) but the top and bottom are auto, then the top is set to the static position. Static position means the position of the element on the page when it doesn't have any position value set. Here, the element is a div and so it would by default get positioned below the img (next line). This is why we see it below the image and not on top of it.

    'top' and 'bottom' are 'auto' and 'height' is not 'auto', then set 'top' to the static position, set 'auto' values for 'margin-top' and 'margin-bottom' to 0, and solve for 'bottom'

  • Similar logic applies for the left, right and width also.

When we give top: 0px; and left: 0px, we are explicitly instructing the UA to position the element at top-left corner of the parent element and so it now overlays the image properly.

Secondly, even if we do this, we would see that the overlay doesn't actually cover the image because though the container is 300px x 300px, the image's dimensions are not restricted and so it will display the full image whereas the overlay element is 100% x 100% of parent (and so is only 300ps x 300px).

There are three ways to address this. One is to use max-height and/or max-width method detailed in one of the existing answers but the drawback is that it will scale down the image while preserving it aspect ratio (and so wouldn't be 300px x 300px). The second option is to explicitly set img dimension as 300px x 300px (same as parent) but this would resize the image without preserving aspect ratio.

The third option (which I recommend is) to use the object-fit: cover on the img. Using this would make the image scaled in such a way that its aspect ratio is preserved and also be the same size as the parent (the extra portions on the bottom and right would be clipped). The only drawback of using this approach is that it lacks IE support. In IE the image would still display but the aspect ratio won't be maintained.

.column {
  position: relative;
  height: 300px;
  width: 300px;
}
img {
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
  object-fit: cover;
}
.overlay {
  background: #ddd;
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  opacity: 0;
  top: 0px;
  left: 0px;
}
.overlay {
  opacity: 0;
  transition: opacity .25s linear;  /* vendorless fallback */
  -o-transition: opacity .25s linear;  /* opera */
  -ms-transition: opacity .25s linear;  /* IE 10 */
  -moz-transition: opacity .25s linear;  /* Firefox */
  -webkit-transition: opacity .25s linear;  /*safari and chrome */
}
.overlay:hover {
  opacity: .75;
}
<div class="column">
  <img src="http://cdn.welingelichtekringen.nl/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/hond-584x340.jpg">
  <div class="overlay">
    <p>
      I'm some test text!
    </p>
  </div>
</div>


The below part is strictly not related to the original question. It was a follow up that we had discussed in chat but I'm adding it here for the sake of continuity.

If the container element has padding or margin like here then the overlay would still not be exactly covering the img. This is because object-fit:cover property fills only the content-area of the box. So, the image would not be present in the padding area of the container whereas the overlay will be present as it takes 100% of parent's dimensions. Overcoming this is requires a simple trick. Reduce the overlay element's size by an amount equal to the padding on both sides and set left equal to the padding-left like here.

2
  • Thank you very much for this great expleanation! I really appreciate it :) It's all clearer in my head now :D
    – M Zeinstra
    Jun 18 '16 at 14:06
  • You're welcome @MZeinstra. Happy that I could help you :)
    – Harry
    Jun 18 '16 at 14:07
0

In overlay class, add:

top:0;
left:0;

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