21

I'm trying to generate a list of primes below 1 billion. I'm trying this, but this kind of structure is pretty shitty. Any suggestions?

a <- 1:1000000000
d <- 0
b <- for (i in a) {for (j in 1:i) {if (i %% j !=0) {d <- c(d,i)}}}
3
  • 6
    Do you need ALL of the primes at once? Seems like you could download them or source them from a place like this if need be: primes.utm.edu/lists/small/millions
    – Chase
    Commented Sep 24, 2010 at 19:16
  • 2
    Here you can get the list of primes < 1000000000 prime-numbers.org
    – Déjà vu
    Commented Sep 25, 2010 at 14:49
  • 1
    if you simply vectorize your calculations they'll run MUCH faster than a sieve due to the nature of R. (see my answer)
    – John
    Commented Sep 25, 2010 at 15:13

11 Answers 11

36

That sieve posted by George Dontas is a good starting point. Here's a much faster version with running times for 1e6 primes of 0.095s as opposed to 30s for the original version.

sieve <- function(n)
{
   n <- as.integer(n)
   if(n > 1e8) stop("n too large")
   primes <- rep(TRUE, n)
   primes[1] <- FALSE
   last.prime <- 2L
   fsqr <- floor(sqrt(n))
   while (last.prime <= fsqr)
   {
      primes[seq.int(2L*last.prime, n, last.prime)] <- FALSE
      sel <- which(primes[(last.prime+1):(fsqr+1)])
      if(any(sel)){
        last.prime <- last.prime + min(sel)
      }else last.prime <- fsqr+1
   }
   which(primes)
}

Here are some alternate algorithms below coded about as fast as possible in R. They are slower than the sieve but a heck of a lot faster than the questioners original post.

Here's a recursive function that uses mod but is vectorized. It returns for 1e5 almost instantaneously and 1e6 in under 2s.

primes <- function(n){
    primesR <- function(p, i = 1){
        f <- p %% p[i] == 0 & p != p[i]
        if (any(f)){
            p <- primesR(p[!f], i+1)
        }
        p
    }
    primesR(2:n)
}

The next one isn't recursive and faster again. The code below does primes up to 1e6 in about 1.5s on my machine.

primest <- function(n){
    p <- 2:n
    i <- 1
    while (p[i] <= sqrt(n)) {
        p <-  p[p %% p[i] != 0 | p==p[i]]
        i <- i+1
    }
    p
}

BTW, the spuRs package has a number of prime finding functions including a sieve of E. Haven't checked to see what the speed is like for them.

And while I'm writing a very long answer... here's how you'd check in R if one value is prime.

isPrime <- function(x){
    div <- 2:ceiling(sqrt(x))
    !any(x %% div == 0)
}
5
  • Your isPrime function is not correct. If you pass 3 in, it returns FALSE.
    – mchangun
    Commented Jul 25, 2013 at 7:50
  • 1
    It didn't work with 2 either, and still doesn't. I designed it just for numbers I don't know as a quick check. I was thinking of fixing it with logicals but it's easily fixed for 3, and only made a tiny bit slower, by changing floor to ceiling (done).
    – John
    Commented Nov 4, 2013 at 12:50
  • Thanks for an excellent post! I wonder if your isPrime function would be improved by replacing 2:ceiling(sqrt(x)) with seq_len(ceiling(sqrt(x)))[-1]
    – De Novo
    Commented Sep 7, 2017 at 18:19
  • That would be an interesting subset of the code to test for speed. seq_len should be faster than : however the negative selection might cancel that out. Maybe it will be better when the number is very large.
    – John
    Commented Sep 8, 2017 at 22:40
  • @John in sieve model by chance we can do calculate prime between ranges ?
    – Nithish
    Commented Jun 1, 2021 at 18:20
24

This is an implementation of the Sieve of Eratosthenes algorithm in R.

sieve <- function(n)
{
   n <- as.integer(n)
   if(n > 1e6) stop("n too large")
   primes <- rep(TRUE, n)
   primes[1] <- FALSE
   last.prime <- 2L
   for(i in last.prime:floor(sqrt(n)))
   {
      primes[seq.int(2L*last.prime, n, last.prime)] <- FALSE
      last.prime <- last.prime + min(which(primes[(last.prime+1):n]))
   }
   which(primes)
}

 sieve(1000000)
3
  • 3
    This is a good implementation of the algorithm but because we're using R it's SLOW... see my response below.
    – John
    Commented Sep 25, 2010 at 16:32
  • Hi, I was reading about that today as I came across an interesting article about Yitabg Zhang and his work on the prime numbers. As a matter fact, Polish entry on Wikipedia for the Sieve contains numerous useful implementations. I suggest that you contribute yours. I was sadden to see that there were no implementation in R available.
    – Konrad
    Commented Apr 6, 2015 at 20:49
  • 1
    It's not mine. I have found it here: rosettacode.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes#R
    – Yorgos
    Commented Apr 7, 2015 at 6:05
10

Prime Numbers in R

The OP asked to generate all prime numbers below one billion. All of the answers provided thus far are either not capable of doing this, will take a long a time to execute, or currently not available in R (see the answer by @Charles). The package RcppAlgos (I am the author) is capable of generating the requested output in just under 1 second using only one thread. It is based off of the segmented sieve of Eratosthenes by Kim Walisch.

RcppAlgos

ser <- system.time(RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e9))  ## using 1 thread
ser
#>    user  system elapsed 
#>   0.942   0.049   0.994

Using Multiple Threads

And in recent versions (i.e. >= 2.3.0), we can utilize multiple threads for even faster generation. For example, now we can generate the primes up to 1 billion in under a quarter of a second!

par <- system.time(RcppAlgos::primeSieve(10^9, nThreads = 8))
par
#>    user  system elapsed 
#>   1.273   0.038   0.224

Summary of Available Packages in R for Generating Primes

  1. schoolmath
  2. primefactr
  3. sfsmisc
  4. primes
  5. numbers
  6. spuRs
  7. randtoolbox
  8. matlab
  9. sieve from @John (see below.. we removed if(n > 1e8) stop("n too large"))
sieve <- function(n) {
    n <- as.integer(n)
    primes <- rep(TRUE, n)
    primes[1] <- FALSE
    last.prime <- 2L
    fsqr <- floor(sqrt(n))
    while (last.prime <= fsqr) {
        primes[seq.int(2L*last.prime, n, last.prime)] <- FALSE
        sel <- which(primes[(last.prime+1):(fsqr+1)])
        if(any(sel)){
            last.prime <- last.prime + min(sel)
        }else last.prime <- fsqr+1
    }
    which(primes)
}

Before we begin, we note that the problems pointed out by @Henrik in schoolmath still exists. Observe:

## 1 is NOT a prime number
schoolmath::primes(start = 1, end = 20)
#> [1]  1  2  3  5  7 11 13 17 19

## This should return 1, however it is saying that 52
##  "prime" numbers less than 10^4 are divisible by 7!!
sum(schoolmath::primes(start = 1, end = 10^4) %% 7L == 0)
#> [1] 52

The point is, don’t use schoolmath for generating primes at this point (I have filed an issue with the maintainer).

Let’s look at randtoolbox as it appears to be incredibly efficient. Observe:

library(microbenchmark)
options(digits = 4)
options(width = 90)

## the argument for get.primes is for how many prime numbers you need
## whereas most packages get all primes less than a certain number
microbenchmark(randtoolbox = get.primes(78498),
               RcppAlgos = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(10^6),
               unit = "relative")
#> Unit: relative
#>         expr   min    lq  mean median    uq     max neval
#>  randtoolbox  1.00  1.00 1.000   1.00 1.000 1.00000   100
#>    RcppAlgos 14.42 11.47 1.174  11.03 9.905 0.06531   100
#> Warning message:
#> In microbenchmark(priRandtoolbox = randtoolbox::get.primes(78498),  :
#>   less accurate nanosecond times to avoid potential integer overflows

A closer look reveals that it is essentially a lookup table (found in the file randtoolbox.c from the source code).

#include "primes.h"

void reconstruct_primes()
{
    int i;
    if (primeNumber[2] == 1)
        for (i = 2; i < 100000; i++)
            primeNumber[i] = primeNumber[i-1] + 2*primeNumber[i];
}

Where primes.h is a header file that contains an array of “halves of differences between prime numbers”. Thus, you will be limited by the number of elements in that array for generating primes (i.e. the first one hundred thousand primes). If you are only working with smaller primes (less than 1,299,709 (i.e. the 100,000th prime)) and you are working on a project that requires the nth prime, randtoolbox is not a bad option.

Below, we perform benchmarks on the rest of the packages.

Primes up to One Million

million <- microbenchmark(
    RcppAlgos = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(10^6),
    numbers = numbers::Primes(10^6),
    spuRs = spuRs::primesieve(c(), 2:10^6),
    primes = primes::generate_primes(1, 10^6),
    primefactr = primefactr::AllPrimesUpTo(10^6),
    sfsmisc = sfsmisc::primes(10^6),
    matlab = matlab::primes(10^6),
    JohnSieve = sieve(10^6),
    unit = "relative"
)

million
#> Unit: relative
#>        expr    min      lq    mean  median      uq    max neval
#>   RcppAlgos  1.000   1.000   1.000   1.000   1.000   1.00   100
#>     numbers 48.830  56.556  66.500  60.447  77.902 110.04   100
#>       spuRs 81.968 105.180 105.275 106.313 107.508 120.82   100
#>      primes  2.250   2.233   2.602   2.224   2.210  30.65   100
#>  primefactr 62.629  68.454  81.878  75.164  98.370 101.82   100
#>     sfsmisc  7.883   8.309   8.782   8.338   8.636  32.21   100
#>      matlab 49.629  57.349  70.098  63.633  86.457  92.91   100
#>   JohnSieve  8.619   8.871   9.970   8.934   9.457  35.28   100

Primes up to Ten Million

ten_million <- microbenchmark(
    RcppAlgos = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(10^7),
    numbers = numbers::Primes(10^7),
    spuRs = spuRs::primesieve(c(), 2:10^7),
    primes = primes::generate_primes(1, 10^7),
    primefactr = primefactr::AllPrimesUpTo(10^7),
    sfsmisc = sfsmisc::primes(10^7),
    matlab = matlab::primes(10^7),
    JohnSieve = sieve(10^7),
    unit = "relative",
    times = 20
)

ten_million
#> Unit: relative
#>        expr     min     lq    mean  median      uq     max neval
#>   RcppAlgos   1.000   1.00   1.000   1.000   1.000   1.000    20
#>     numbers 160.225 173.89 181.687 181.425 191.287 207.471    20
#>       spuRs 205.452 204.52 205.602 202.691 206.626 212.481    20
#>      primes   2.431   2.43   2.446   2.408   2.465   2.562    20
#>  primefactr 161.078 188.67 198.109 197.890 208.292 236.847    20
#>     sfsmisc  11.580  11.68  12.687  11.799  12.675  21.226    20
#>      matlab 145.366 163.90 173.566 175.980 184.523 200.614    20
#>   JohnSieve  12.452  12.37  13.774  12.309  14.212  21.226    20

Primes up to One Hundred Million

For the next two benchmarks, we only consider RcppAlgos, sfsmisc, primes, and the sieve function by @John.

hundred_million <- microbenchmark(
    RcppAlgos = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(10^8),
    sfsmisc = sfsmisc::primes(10^8),
    primes = primes::generate_primes(1, 10^8),
    JohnSieve = sieve(10^8),
    unit = "relative",
    times = 20
)

hundred_million
#> Unit: relative
#>       expr    min     lq  mean median     uq    max neval
#>  RcppAlgos  1.000  1.000  1.00  1.000  1.000  1.000    20
#>    sfsmisc 14.509 14.490 14.49 14.497 14.570 13.932    20
#>     primes  2.416  2.431  2.43  2.428  2.438  2.371    20
#>  JohnSieve 15.118 15.156 15.15 15.196 15.245 14.456    20

Primes up to One Billion

N.B. We must remove the condition if(n > 1e8) stop("n too large") in the sieve function.

## See top section
## system.time(primeSieve(10^9))

invisible(gc())
pm_1e9 <- system.time(primes::generate_primes(1, 10^9))
pm_1e9
#>    user  system elapsed 
#>   2.846   0.047   2.892

invisible(gc())
sieve_1e9 <- system.time(sieve(10^9))
sieve_1e9
#>    user  system elapsed 
#>   12.50    1.20   13.71

invisible(gc())
sfs_1e9 <- system.time(sfsmisc::primes(10^9))
sfs_1e9
#>    user  system elapsed 
#>  12.058   1.154  13.213

From these comparison, we see that RcppAlgos scales much better as n gets larger.

suppressWarnings(suppressMessages(library(dplyr)))
suppressWarnings(suppressMessages(library(purrr)))

billion <- tibble(
    expr = c("RcppAlgos", "primes", "sfsmisc", "JohnSieve"),
    time = c(ser["elapsed"], pm_1e9["elapsed"],
              sfs_1e9["elapsed"], sieve_1e9["elapsed"])
)

my_scale <- \(x) x / min(x, na.rm = TRUE)

time_table <- map(
    list(million, ten_million, hundred_million, billion),
    ~ .x %>% group_by(expr) %>% summarise(med = median(time))
) %>%
    reduce(left_join, by = join_by(expr)) %>%
    rename(`1e6` = 2, `1e7` = 3, `1e8` = 4, `1e9` = 5) %>%
    mutate(across(2:5, ~ my_scale(.x)))

knitr::kable(
    time_table %>%
        mutate(across(2:5, ~ round(my_scale(.x), 2)))
)
expr 1e6 1e7 1e8 1e9
RcppAlgos 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00
numbers 60.45 181.43 NA NA
spuRs 106.31 202.69 NA NA
primes 2.22 2.41 2.43 2.91
primefactr 75.16 197.89 NA NA
sfsmisc 8.34 11.80 14.50 13.29
matlab 63.63 175.98 NA NA
JohnSieve 8.93 12.31 15.20 13.79

The difference is even more dramatic when we utilize multiple threads:

algos_time <- list(
    algos_1e6 = microbenchmark(
        ser = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e6),
        par = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e6, nThreads = 8), unit = "relative"
    ),
    algos_1e7 = microbenchmark(
        ser = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e7),
        par = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e7, nThreads = 8), unit = "relative"
    ),
    algos_1e8 = microbenchmark(
        ser = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e8),
        par = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e8, nThreads = 8),
        unit = "relative", times = 20
    ),
    algos_1e9 = microbenchmark(
        ser = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e9),
        par = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e9, nThreads = 8),
        unit = "relative", times = 10
    )
)

ser_vs_par <- map(
    algos_time, ~ .x %>% group_by(expr) %>% summarise(med = median(time))
) %>%
    reduce(left_join, by = join_by(expr)) %>%
    rename(`1e6` = 2, `1e7` = 3, `1e8` = 4, `1e9` = 5) %>%
    mutate(across(2:5, ~ my_scale(.x))) %>%
    filter(expr == "ser") %>%
    unlist()

And multiplying the table above by the respective median times for the serial results:

time_parallel <- bind_cols(
    expr = time_table[, 1],
    map(2:5, \(x) time_table[, x] * ser_vs_par[x]),
) %>%
    add_row(expr = "RcppAlgos-Par",
            `1e6` = 1, `1e7` = 1, `1e8` = 1, `1e9` = 1) %>%
    arrange(`1e6`)

knitr::kable(
    time_parallel %>%
        mutate(across(2:5, ~ round(my_scale(.x), 2)))
)
expr 1e6 1e7 1e8 1e9
RcppAlgos-Par 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00
RcppAlgos 2.70 3.57 3.70 4.27
primes 6.01 8.59 8.99 12.42
sfsmisc 22.52 42.10 53.66 56.74
JohnSieve 24.13 43.92 56.25 58.87
numbers 163.28 647.32 NA NA
matlab 171.89 627.89 NA NA
primefactr 203.04 706.06 NA NA
spuRs 287.18 723.19 NA NA

Primes Over a Range

microbenchmark(priRcppAlgos = RcppAlgos::primeSieve(10^9, 10^9 + 10^6),
               priNumbers = numbers::Primes(10^9, 10^9 + 10^6),
               priPrimes = primes::generate_primes(10^9, 10^9 + 10^6),
               unit = "relative", times = 20)
#> Unit: relative
#>          expr    min     lq    mean  median      uq     max neval
#>  priRcppAlgos    1.0    1.0    1.00    1.00    1.00    1.00    20
#>    priNumbers  103.9  101.4   92.62   96.43   94.54   46.57    20
#>     priPrimes 2325.2 2266.2 2069.02 2152.60 2109.84 1042.02    20

Primes up to 10 billion in Under 3 Seconds

##  primes less than 10 billion
system.time(tenBillion <- RcppAlgos::primeSieve(10^10, nThreads = 8))
#>    user  system elapsed 
#>  13.835   0.700   2.388

length(tenBillion)
#> [1] 455052511

## Warning!!!... Large object created
tenBillionSize <- object.size(tenBillion)
print(tenBillionSize, units = "Gb")
#> 3.4 Gb

rm(tenBillionSize)
invisible(gc())

Primes Over a Range of Very Large Numbers:

Prior to version 2.3.0, we were simply using the same algorithm for numbers of every magnitude. This is okay for smaller numbers when most of the sieving primes have at least one multiple in each segment (Generally, the segment size is limited by the size of L1 Cache ~32KiB). However, when we are dealing with larger numbers, the sieving primes will contain many numbers that will have fewer than one multiple per segment. This situation creates a lot of overhead, as we are performing many worthless checks that pollutes the cache. Thus, we observe much slower generation of primes when the numbers are very large. If you want to test yourself, see Installing older version of R package).

In later versions (>= 2.3.0), we are using the cache friendly improvement originally developed by Tomás Oliveira. The improvements are drastic:

## Over 3x faster than older versions
system.time(cacheFriendly <- RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e15, 1e15 + 1e9))
#>    user  system elapsed 
#>   1.191   0.037   1.228

##  Over 8x faster using multiple threads
system.time(RcppAlgos::primeSieve(1e15, 1e15 + 1e9, nThreads = 8))
#>    user  system elapsed 
#>   2.105   0.062   0.347 

Take Away

  1. There are many great packages available for generating primes
  2. If you are looking for speed in general, there is no match to RcppAlgos::primeSieve, especially for larger numbers.
  3. If you need primes in a range, the packages numbers, primes, & RcppAlgos are the way to go.
  4. The importance of good programming practices cannot be overemphasized (e.g. vectorization, using correct data types, etc.). This is most aptly demonstrated by the pure base R solution provided by @John. It is concise, clear, and very efficient.
10
  • your code is good other than returning the huge array of found primes; couldn't you return an iterator over the non-composites per segment page rather than the huge results array and reduce the memory use without losing time? And if all you need are the nth prime or the count of primes over a range, these can be provided as functions that work with the sieve (bits?) directly. Commented Dec 15, 2018 at 3:17
  • @GordonBGood, thanks for your comment. Yes, you are correct. There is a lot that can be improved in the current implementation. The iterator is one, the other is dealing with larger primes (e.g. greater than 1e15). I’m working on an implementation right now that better deals with the latter. Before I say anything else, huge credit goes to Kim Walisch and Tomas Oliviera e Silva. For that matter, credit to you as well. Your posts on SoA vs SoE were very inspiring and I reference them frequently. When I update to include iterators I will be sure to mention you. Commented Dec 15, 2018 at 3:33
  • Thank you, we do our best. While we have a channel of communication, I'll let you know that I'm working on a new algorithm that looks like it will equal or even beat Kim Walisch's primesieve by a little bit when inplemented in languages that can compile to efficient native code such as Rust, Nim, Haskell, and (of course) C/C++. Hopefully you'll see it posted somewhere within the next few weeks. It is somewhat simpler to implement than primesieve. Commented Dec 15, 2018 at 4:57
  • @GordonBGood, I cannot wait to see it. How will you release it? Github? Journal? Again, thanks for all your contributions. Commented Dec 15, 2018 at 14:16
  • 1
    I recently saw someone else's github repo on the Sieve of Eratosthenes, which seems to be very fast (at least on high end desktop CPU's) and since it is written in C I though you might like to look at it. I've skimmed through it and think I understand how it works, but it is quite complex and a bit hard to read at 2500 lines of C code. My developing version is likely to be much shorter and definitely not C - I'm may write it in Nim (essentially a C front end), which is more concise, yet most can read it easily. Commented Dec 31, 2018 at 8:17
6

Best way that I know of to generate all primes (without getting into crazy math) is to use the Sieve of Eratosthenes.

It is pretty straightforward to implement and allows you calculate primes without using division or modulus. The only downside is that it is memory intensive, but various optimizations can be made to improve memory (ignoring all even numbers for instance).

4

This method should be Faster and simpler.

allPrime <- function(n) {
  primes <- rep(TRUE, n)
  primes[1] <- FALSE
  for (i in 1:sqrt(n)) {
    if (primes[i]) primes[seq(i^2, n, i)] <- FALSE
  }
  which(primes)
}

0.12 second on my computer for n = 1e6

I implemented this in function AllPrimesUpTo in package primefactr.

0
3

I recommend primegen, Dan Bernstein's implementation of the Atkin-Bernstein sieve. It's very fast and will scale well to other problems. You'll need to pass data out to the program to use it, but I imagine there are ways to do that?

5
  • Looks like a C-implementation. With the right tweaking you can incorporate primegen in R without problem (see ?.C)
    – Joris Meys
    Commented Oct 5, 2010 at 11:32
  • @Joris: I didn't know you could do that! Thanks for the heads-up. (I was imagining calling it as an external.)
    – Charles
    Commented Oct 5, 2010 at 13:09
  • "primegen" isn't particularly fast as compared to Kim Walich's primesieve, which does slow down dramatically for ranges larger than a billion. It also has a "C" interface so you could call it from "R" in a similar way. Commented Dec 14, 2018 at 5:24
  • 1
    @GordonBGood Agreed, not sure what I was thinking at the time. I’m going to vote for Joseph Wood’s answer now.
    – Charles
    Commented Dec 14, 2018 at 14:43
  • 1
    @Charles, yes, I just voted for Joseph Wood's answer, too. Commented Dec 15, 2018 at 2:58
1

You can also cheat and use the primes() function in the schoolmath package :D

1
1

The isPrime() function posted above could use sieve(). One only needs to check if any of the primes < ceiling(sqrt(x)) divide x with no remainder. Need to handle 1 and 2, also.

isPrime <- function(x) {
    div <- sieve(ceiling(sqrt(x)))
    (x > 1) & ((x == 2) | !any(x %% div == 0))
}
4
  • What package is sieve from? What does it return, and why does this work? Commented Jul 13, 2014 at 3:35
  • The sieve() function is from the post above by "John." It implements the Sieve of Eratosthenes in R. Are you asking why we only have to check if primes divide and ignore non-primes? That's basic number theory.
    – John
    Commented Jul 13, 2014 at 4:23
  • 1
    I was not asking that. I thought you were using a function in a publicly-available package, sorry. But that means that this probably shouldn't be an answer, but a comment on John's answer. In addition, I suspect that finding the primes to use for division is so expensive, that you are better off not doing so. As a bonus question, for what values of x do you actually need ceiling rather than floor in this computation? floor is correct mathematically. Commented Jul 13, 2014 at 4:35
  • 1
    Yes, it should be a comment, but I am not allowed to comment on John's answer, since my "reputation" is < 50. The sieve() function John posted is not expensive. If execution time is a concern, than one should use Bernstein's primegen.
    – John
    Commented Jul 13, 2014 at 15:58
1

No suggestions, but allow me an extended comment of sorts. I ran this experiment with the following code:

get_primes <- function(n_min, n_max){
  options(scipen=999)
    result = vector()
      for (x in seq(max(n_min,2), n_max)){
        has_factor <- F
        for (p in seq(2, ceiling(sqrt(x)))){
          if(x %% p == 0) has_factor <- T
          if(has_factor == T) break
          }
        if(has_factor==F) result <- c(result,x)
        }
    result
}

and after almost 24 hours of uninterrupted computer operations, I got a list of 5,245,897 primes. The π(1,000,000,000) = 50,847,534, so it would have taken 10 days to complete this calculation.

Here is the file of these first ~ 5 million prime numbers.

4
  • For your trial run to get the ~5 million primes, what was your upper bound? I'm guessing it was one hundred million but that isn't clear to me. Secondly, it looks like you are missing a zero in your pi(100,000,000) statement (It should be pi(1,000,000,000)). Commented Sep 12, 2020 at 12:43
  • @JosephWood Yes, as in the OP. Thanks for pointing out the pi transcription error. Commented Sep 12, 2020 at 19:15
  • Just curious, did you see my answer above? It shows that, not only can you generate primes under a billion in under a second, but you can get the primes under ten billion in around 5 seconds. It also shows other base R methods that are able to generate primes under a billion in a reasonable amount of time. I say all this because it appears you are trying to show that this exercise of generating primes under a billion is not a feasible tasks. Please correct me if I misunderstand. Commented Sep 13, 2020 at 12:06
  • @JosephWood I hadn't read it because it started off talking about packages. But it turns out the package is yours! That is very impressive! Commented Sep 13, 2020 at 15:47
0
for (i in 2:1000) {
a = (2:(i-1))
b = as.matrix(i%%a)
c = colSums(b != 0)
if (c == i-2)
 {
 print(i)
 }
 }
1
  • 1
    That isn't an useful answer, even more so if this code has to run for billions of numbers.
    – vonbrand
    Commented Oct 17, 2015 at 23:11
0

Every number (i) before (a) is checked against the list of prime numbers (n) generated by checking for number (i-1)

Thanks for suggestions:

prime = function(a,n){
    n=c(2)
    i=3
    while(i <=a){
      for(j in n[n<=sqrt(i)]){
        r=0
        if (i%%j == 0){
          r=1}
        if(r==1){break}
        
        
      }
      if(r!=1){n = c(n,i)}
      i=i+2
    }
    print(n)
  }

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