I have two vectors, one (A) of about 100 million non-unique elements (integers), the other (B) of 1 million of the same, unique, elements. I am trying to get a list containing the indices of the repeated instances of each element of B in A.

A <- c(2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 3, 2)
B <- 1:3

# would result in this:
[[1]]
[1] 2 3 4 6 7

[[2]]
[1]  1  5 10

[[3]]
[1] 8 9

I first, naively, tried this:

b_indices <- lapply(B, function(b) which(A == b))

which is horribly inefficient, and apparently wouldn't complete in a few years.

The second thing I tried was to create a list of empty vectors, indexed with all elements of B, and to then loop through A, appending the index to the corresponding vector for each element in A. Although technically O(n), I'm not sure about the time to repeatedly append elements. This approach would apparently take ~ 2-3 days, which is still too slow...

Is there anything that could work faster?

  • Try which(matrix(rep(A, length(B))==rep(B, each = length(A)), ncol=length(B)), arr.ind=TRUE)[,1] – akrun Jun 19 '16 at 14:23
  • If you want to preallocate a list, you can find sizes with table. – alistaire Jun 19 '16 at 14:30
  • 2
    What do you intend to do with the result? I suspect there are efficient solutions for reaching you ultimate goal without this intermediate result. – Roland Jun 19 '16 at 15:01
  • I actually have a 12 * 100 million table. I need to subset specific parts of it based on certain criteria. Those conditions are in other vectors, of which B is the largest, but I don't know which part I'll need to subset in advance, so I found the most convenient way was to pre-compute and save list of indices... – Gerome Pistre Jun 20 '16 at 2:20
  • 1
    Although now that I had time to read up a bit more on data.table, there are indeed simpler and more efficient solutions using tables and multiple keys. – Gerome Pistre Jun 20 '16 at 6:52
up vote 6 down vote accepted

data.table is arguably the most efficient way of dealing with Big Data in R and it would even let you avoid having to use that 1 million length vector all together!

require(data.table)
a <- data.table(x=rep(c("a","b","c"),each=3))
a[ , list( yidx = list(.I) ) , by = x ]

   a  yidx
1: a 1,2,3
2: b 4,5,6
3: c 7,8,9

Using your example data:

a <- data.table(x=c(2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 3, 2))
a[ , list( yidx = list(.I) ) , by = x ]

   a      yidx
1: 2   1, 5,10
2: 1 2,3,4,6,7
3: 3       8,9

Add this to your benchmarks. I dare say it should be significantly faster than using the built-in functions, if you test it at scale. The bigger the data the better the relative performance of data.table in my experience.

In my benchmark it only takes about 46% as long as order on my Debian laptop and only 5% as long as order on my Windows laptop with 8GB RAM and a 2.x GHz CPU.

B <- seq_len(1e6)
set.seed(42)
A <- data.table(x = sample(B, 1e8, TRUE))
system.time({
+   res <- A[ , list( yidx = list(.I) ) , by = x ]
+ })
   user  system elapsed 
   4.25    0.22    4.50 
  • @Roland works fine for me the way it is. I find it more readable this way in a cluttered environment, but it's just a matter of preference. – Hack-R Jun 19 '16 at 14:38
  • @Roland I'm not comparing timing from different systems, I'm comparing them both from my old laptop. No need to be so defensive and jump to conclusions. Feel free to see if you get a different result but on both of my laptops data.table is more than 2x as fast! – Hack-R Jun 19 '16 at 22:25
  • Hard to choose, both answers are very informative! For my particular case I find 1 minute for order + split, against 6 seconds for the entire data.table solution, so I'll pick this one (on OSX with 16GB RAM and 2.3 GHz cpu). Would it just be possible to explain what the ".I" refers to? Although I need to start reading up more on data.table anyway... – Gerome Pistre Jun 20 '16 at 1:56
  • The different benchmarks are interesting. If the 5 % on Windows because data.table is faster or because my approach is slower than on the *nix system? – Roland Jun 20 '16 at 7:21

This is fast:

A1 <- order(A, method = "radix")

split(A1, A[A1])
#$`1`
#[1] 2 3 4 6 7
#
#$`2`
#[1]  1  5 10
#
#$`3`
#[1] 8 9

B <- seq_len(1e6)
set.seed(42)
A <- sample(B, 1e8, TRUE)

system.time({
  A1 <- order(A, method = "radix")

  res <- split(A1, A[A1])
})
# user      system     elapsed 
#8.650       1.056       9.704
  • 2
    @Hack-R Which R version are you using? data.table's radix sorting was implemented in base R with R 3.3.0. – Roland Jun 19 '16 at 14:46
  • 1
    It doesn't seem like ordering is necessary. Doesn't split(seq_along(A), A)[B] also do it? – Frank Jun 19 '16 at 16:08
  • 1
    @Frank : was thinking the same but ,interestingly enough, it seems that ordering turns a bit faster; probably filling the result inside split in a 'cache-hit' style after supplying an ordered "f" in split could have that effect? – alexis_laz Jun 19 '16 at 16:25
  • @Roland you got pretty heated when I posted the system.time from data.table. Why not run my solution on our laptop and see if you agree that it's faster? – Hack-R Jun 19 '16 at 22:26
  • @Hack-R I didn't get heated at all. It seemed like you didn't run both benchmarks as there was no indication otherwise in your answer. I even agreed that you solution is faster in my comment that (yet again) has been deleted as apparently "not constructive". I find that pretty aggravating. – Roland Jun 20 '16 at 7:14

We can also use dplyr

library(dplyr)
data_frame(A) %>% 
      mutate(B = row_number()) %>%
      group_by(A) %>%
      summarise(B = list(B)) %>% 
      .$B

#[[1]]
#[1] 2 3 4 6 7

#[[2]]
#[1]  1  5 10

#[[3]]
#[1] 8 9

In a smaller dataset of 1e5 size, it gives system.time

#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.01    0.00    0.02 

but with larger example as showed in the other post, it is slower. However, this is dplyr...

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