6

I have these two implementations of gcd function :

def gcd1(a,b)
  if a==b
    a
  elsif a>b
    if (a%b)==0
      b
    else
      gcd1(a%b,b)
    end
  else
    if (b%a)==0
      a
    else
      gcd1(a,b%a)
    end
  end
end
def gcd2(a,b)
  if(a==b)
    return a
  elsif b>a
    min,max=a,b
  else
    min,max=b,a
  end
  while (max%min)!=0
    min,max=max%min,min
  end
  min
end

The function gcd1 is tail recursive while gcd2 uses a while loop.

I have verified that rubinius does TCO by benchmarking factorial function, only with the factorial function the benchmarks showed that the recursive version and the iteration version are "same-ish"(I used benchmark-ips).

But for the above, benchmarks shows that gcd1 is faster by at least a factor of two than gcd2(recursion twice as fast than iteration, even faster).

The code I used to benchmark is this :

Benchmark.ips do |x|
  x.report "gcd1 tail recursive" do
    gcd1(12016,18016)
  end
  x.report "gcd2 while loop" do
    gcd2(12016,18016)
  end
  x.compare!
end

the result :

Warming up --------------------------------------
 gcd1 tail recursive    47.720k i/100ms
     gcd2 while loop    23.118k i/100ms
Calculating -------------------------------------
 gcd1 tail recursive    874.210k (± 7.1%) i/s -      4.343M
     gcd2 while loop    299.676k (± 6.6%) i/s -      1.503M

Comparison:
 gcd1 tail recursive:   874209.8 i/s
     gcd2 while loop:   299676.2 i/s - 2.92x slower

I'm running Arch linux x64, processor i5-5200 2.2 GHZ quad-core.

The ruby implementation is Rubinius 3.40 .

So how can recursion be faster than the loop ?

Update

Just to say that fibonacci has the same situation : tail recursive version is at least twice as fast as the loop version, the program I used for fibonacci : http://pastebin.com/C8ZFB0FR

3
  • 2
    I don't have time to go through your code, so I can't give you an answer, but I wanted to address one small thing: you ask "So how can recursion be faster than the loop ?" and I just wanted to point out that tail-recursion is a loop, it is exactly equivalent. Maybe Rubinius's inliner works better than its loop unroller? You'll really have to look at the generated native machine code, in order to get a definitive answer. – Jörg W Mittag Jun 20 '16 at 2:04
  • @JörgWMittag Yes I know tail-recursion is equivalent to a loop , that's why I'm asking because if equivalent they should have similar performance !! – niceman Jun 20 '16 at 8:28
  • Well, in my book, 2–3× is similar :-D Like I said, one possible reason could be that Rubinius is better at inlining than it is at loop unrolling. This would produce a larger block of straight-line code (i.e. code without conditionals) for the recursive version than for the loop version, and thus a larger block of straight-line code to run optimizations on. But that's just a guess. You'll have to look at the code in various stages of optimization in the compiler, the JITter and at the generated native machine code to figure out what's really going on. – Jörg W Mittag Jun 20 '16 at 8:34
2
+100

In the example you're using it only takes 3 calls/loops to get to the answer, so I don't think you're actually testing the right thing. Try with two consecutive Fibonacci numbers instead (eg 2000th and 2001th) and the results should not differ that much.

(I'm sorry, I don't have reputation to make a comment yet).

EDIT: I finally managed to install [a part of] rubinius and managed to re-create the phenomena you're referring to. This is not about recursion, it's about multiple assignment. If you change

      while n>0
        a,b=b,a+b
        n-=1
      end

to

      while n>0
        t=a
        a=b
        b=t+b
        n-=1
      end

the while loop version should perform (a bit) faster. The same applies to the original GCD program, i.e. replacing

        min,max=max%min,min

with

        t=min
        min=max%t
        max=t

is the thing.

This was not the case with ruby-2.1, i.e. the while loop seemed faster, just in the form you provided.

Hope that helps!

3
  • same result with fib(2000), this is the code I used : pastebin.com/C8ZFB0FR – niceman Jun 26 '16 at 18:22
  • As of Fibonacci numbers I just meant to use them as arguments to gcd functions, as with fib(2000) and fib(2001) they have to perform 2000 steps (testing on 3 steps only is never a good idea), but anyway your fibonacci test was even nicer case. – dercz Jun 26 '16 at 22:41
  • Who would have thought of, I also tried gcd(a,b) where a is fib(2000) and b is fib(2001) and gcd with multiple assignment (they aren't calculated inside the benchmark), it reported the loop was slower but by 1.17x only – niceman Jun 27 '16 at 13:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.