37

If I have an array of objects, and loop through them assigning a value to an attribute for each one, WebStorm warns me:

Values assigned to primitive will be lost

However, when testing in the console, I do not "lose" any values.

This only happens when the loop is inside of a function.

An example of this error below:

let people = [
    {
        name: 'Foo',
        age: 21,
        surname: 'FooBar'
    },

    {
        name: 'Bar',
        age: 51,
        surname: 'FooBar'
    }
];

Without function wrapper:

people.forEach(function (person) {
    person.surname = 'Baz'; // No error. Works in console.
});

With function wrapper:

function changeSurname(people) {
    people.forEach(function (person) {
        person.surname = 'Baz'; // Error warning me that value assigned to primitive will be lost.
    });
}

changeSurname(people);

Both of these produce the same output in the console (the surname is changed to 'baz').

I assume this has something to do with the object reference and what person points to, but I am not sure exactly what.

Why do I see this error?

What potential bug is WebStorm trying to save me from?

9
  • let makes the variable a constant making the internal object primitive types. if you need to change the values inside it, do not make it constant use var to declare the variable – Akshay Khandelwal Jun 20 '16 at 13:13
  • 4
    @AkshayKhandelwal I am not convinced that is true. Even with var I still get the error. const makes things a constant. let scopes the variable to the block scope. – Matt Lishman Jun 20 '16 at 13:15
  • 1
    @Rayon But that is my confusion, the value is not lost as far as I can tell. If you copy the code (the one with the function wrapper), the surnames are changed correctly. Am I misunderstanding what is lost? Because I don't see any values get lost. – Matt Lishman Jun 20 '16 at 13:19
  • 2
    @MattLishman, Earlier value of surname object was holding is lost..IDE is trying to say that even though it is an argument for function, it is passed by reference hence object will be updated! – Rayon Jun 20 '16 at 13:22
  • 2
    @Rayon Ah, I see! I misunderstood which value it was referring to. Quite an annoying error given that updating the object is exactly what I want to do... Is there something wrong with this style of coding then? (this might have to be another SO question) – Matt Lishman Jun 20 '16 at 13:27
24

There's nothing improper in your code, WebStorm's type inference is getting a bit confused (this aspect of JavaScript is particularly confusing).

Its linter sees a string and assumes you will try something like this:

var primitive = "september";
primitive.vowels = 3;

primitive.vowels;
// => undefined

Which would lead to a 'lost' value.

The fact that it only catches this 'error' inside of a function seems like an outright bug that should be reported.

To further understand this weird part of JavaScript, I recommend Angus Croll's excellent in-depth article here.

2
  • 2
    I can't find a bug report for this. However, I can no longer replicate this on later versions of WebStorm. Unfortunately I don't remember the version I saw this bug in but it seems to have been resolved! – Matt Lishman Mar 22 '17 at 8:43
  • 2
    I'm using webstorm, current last version and I have the same issue. – Baumannzone Mar 20 '18 at 18:12
3

If you will use square brackets the JetBrains editor(WebS/PhpS) will not show you any error.

person['surname'] = 'Baz';
5
  • This is actually different. This would use the variable surname. Do you mean person['surname'] (notice the quotes)? – Matt Lishman Feb 12 '19 at 14:18
  • Yeah, I was in a hurry and forgot the quotes !! It should fix the editor error. Also check if your editor is updated to the latest version – Florin f Feb 12 '19 at 14:22
  • My webstorm doesn't seem to show the error anymore when copying my code. Does yours? Unfortunately that means I cannot test if this solves the issue or not. – Matt Lishman Feb 12 '19 at 14:25
  • Yes, it does, this is how I found your post, but it was solved with what I posted above. It maybe an exceptional situation. – Florin f Feb 12 '19 at 14:45
  • Then eslint will catch it with ..is better written using in notation. :) – James Gentes Aug 15 '19 at 20:57
0

I just had the same issue.

You can also ask WebStorm to disable inspection for the next line, but I decided to use a for of loop instead:

for (person of people) {
    person.surname = 'Baz';
}

It actually made my code more readable as a result so I was happy.

-1

I faced similar issue with angular custom directive.

below was my custom directive:

function customDirective() {
      return {
        scope: {
          model: '='
        }
        link: function(scope) {
                scope.resetModel = function() {
                    scope.model.name = null;   //In these lines I was getting the above 
                    scope.model.email = null;  //mentioned warning in webstorm.
                }
            }
      }
}

After going through the $compile docs, I decided to use the below code which solves this warning and works fine with the binding to child and parent scopes, yes of course unless until your model is an object reference.

function customDirective() {
       return {
         scope: {
            model:'<' // Please refer the above linked angular docs for in detail explanation.
         }
         link: function(scope) {
            scope.resetModel = function() {
               scope.model.name = null;
               scope.model.email = null;
            }
         }
      }
}
4
  • 3
    Though this might be useful for someone else, it doesn't really answer my question. My question has nothing to do with angular. (And Webstorm doesn't understand angular to that level anyway) – Matt Lishman Nov 14 '16 at 13:55
  • Not sure why this was downvoted. I found this answer looking up the same issue. I think the warning is triggered when you declare a variable that isn't used or returned, intellij thinks it's pointless but that's just because it's ignorant to the two way binding. – Eats Indigo Aug 10 '17 at 10:05
  • @MattLishman the question has nothing to do with Angular. If you want to expand how a similar thing happens if you change = with <, please do it somewhere else, it only wasted my and possibly, many other people's time. – Clint Eastwood Dec 6 '19 at 19:15
  • @ClintEastwood were you intending to reply to me there? – Matt Lishman Dec 23 '19 at 15:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.