35

As clang-format is a tool to only reformat code, is it possible that such formatting can break working code or at least change how it works? Is there some kind of contract that it will/can not change how code works?

We have a lot of code that we want to format with clang-format. This means, many lines of code will change. Not having to review every single line of code that only changed due to a clang-format would be a big simplification of this process.

I would say that clang-format will not change how code works. On the other hand I am not 100% sure, if this can be guaranteed.

14
  • 6
    If clang-format broke valid code it'd be pretty useless, don't you think?
    – EOF
    Jun 20 '16 at 16:36
  • 1
    @EOF, agreed, but can you guarantee that clang-format is bug-free? :)
    – rici
    Jun 20 '16 at 16:39
  • 8
    Are the executables the same? Jun 20 '16 at 16:44
  • 6
    Also, I think @WeatherVane's question is the key, here. If you compile the original and the reformatted programs and the resulting executables are the same, then you can be confident that there were no semantic changes. Although personally I find it unlikely that you would ever find a bug of this nature in clang-format, if you are working in a context which requires extraordinary paranoia, that test would be simple enough to perform.
    – rici
    Jun 20 '16 at 16:51
  • 1
    And if your project is a header-only library, or header files are shipped as well, then checking the binaries won't be enough, you also need good coverage tests... Which is why we test our software at various levels ;) Jun 20 '16 at 17:04
72

Short answer: YES.


The clang-format tool has a -sort-includes option. Changing the order of #include directives can definitely change the behavior of existing code, and may break existing code.

Since the corresponding SortIncludes option is set to true by several of the built-in styles, it might not be obvious that clang-format is going to reorder your includes.

MyStruct.h:

struct MyStruct {
    uint8_t value;
};

original.c:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stddef.h>
#include "MyStruct.h"

int main (int argc, char **argv) {
    struct MyStruct s = { 0 };
    return s.value;
}

Now let's say we run clang-format -style=llvm original.c > restyled.c.

restyled.c:

#include "MyStruct.h"
#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  struct MyStruct s = {0};
  return s.value;
}

Due to the reordering of the header files, I get the following error when compiling restyled.c:

In file included from restyled.c:1:
./MyStruct.h:2:5: error: unknown type name 'uint8_t'
    uint8_t value;
    ^
1 error generated.

However, this issue should be easy to work around. It's unlikely that you have order-dependent includes like this, but if you do, you can fix the problem by putting a blank line between groups of headers that require a specific order, since apparently clang-format only sorts groups of #include directives with no non-#include lines in between.

fixed-original.c:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stddef.h>

#include "MyStruct.h"

int main (int argc, char **argv) {
    struct MyStruct s = { 0 };
    return s.value;
}

fixed-restyled.c:

#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdint.h>

#include "MyStruct.h"

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  struct MyStruct s = {0};
  return s.value;
}

Note that stdint.h and stddef.h were still reordered since their includes are still "grouped", but that the new blank line prevented MyStruct.h from being moved before the standard library includes.


However...

If reordering your #include directives breaks your code, you should probably do one of the following anyway:

  1. Explicitly include the dependencies for each header in the header file. In my example, I'd need to include stdint.h in MyStruct.h.

  2. Add a comment line between the include groups that explicitly states the ordering dependency. Remember that any non-#include line should break up a group, so comment lines work as well. The comment line in the following code also prevents clang-format from including MyStruct.h before the standard library headers.

alternate-original.c:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stddef.h>
// must come after stdint.h
#include "MyStruct.h"

int main (int argc, char **argv) {
    struct MyStruct s = { 0 };
    return s.value;
}
0
11

For sure it can change how your code works. And the reason is C program can view some properties of its source code. What I'm thinking about is __LINE__ macro, but I'm not sure there are no other ways.

Consider 1.c:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){printf("%d\n", __LINE__);}

Then:

> clang 1.c -o 1.exe & 1.exe
2

Now do some clang-format:

> clang-format -style=Chromium 1.c >2.c

And 2.c is:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
  printf("%d\n", __LINE__);
}

And, of course, output has changed:

> clang 2.c -o 2.exe & 2.exe
3
4

Since clang-format affects only whitespace characters, you can check that files before and after clang-formating are identical up to whitespaces. In Linux/BSD/OS X you can use diff and tr for that:

$ diff --ignore-all-space <(tr '\n' ' ' < 2.c ) <(tr '\n' ' ' < 1.c)

1.c:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {printf("Hello, world!\n"); return 0;}

2.c:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    printf("Hello, world!\n");
    return 0;
}

Output of diff command is empty, meaning that files 1.c and 2.c are identical up to whitespaces.

As Karoly mentioned in his comment, note that in ideal conditions you still have to check spaces that matters, e.g. string literals. But in the real world I believe this test is more than enough.

6
  • 1
    Great idea, though technically you still have to check the whitespaces that matter (strings). Jun 20 '16 at 16:54
  • 2
    The other whitespace that matters is the newline that terminates a preprocessor directive. There's also whitespace that separates alphanumeric tokens - else if is not elseif - but we'll assume it doesn't break those. In both cases, you should expect a syntax error rather than a subtle change of semantics. Jun 20 '16 at 17:18
  • 1
    @KarolyHorvath: unfamiliar as I am with clang-format, surely its writers thought of string literals?
    – Jongware
    Jun 20 '16 at 17:33
  • 2
    There's also #define foo(bar) versus #define foo (bar) and a number of other issues such as __LINE__ changing if newlines get inserted or deleted.
    – Jens
    Jun 23 '16 at 18:29
  • 1
    I believe "affects only whitespace" is not entirely true, since it can break long strings, introducing additional quotes. clang-format-5 can also introduce comments at namespace closing braces, i.e. } // namespace foo. Aug 9 '18 at 11:13
3

clang-format reformatted ASM code in a project because we effectively did this:

#define ASM _asm

ASM {

  ...

}
1
  • This is helpful because changes in a .h file dealing with assembly code can break things.
    – ekrich
    Dec 30 '20 at 2:45
1

yes

it will not break the working flow

the system has the config switch: "C_Cpp.clang_format_sortIncludes": false, but it not work, i don't know what is wrong...

my version is:ms-vscode.cpptools-0.13.1

this is my solution:

for the stable working flow ,use the grammar:

// clang-format off

...here is your code

// clang-format on

0
0

It can break your code, if you use special constructs in your code and your settings for formatting.

Inline Assembler

If you normally compile your code with gcc and make use of gcc-style inline assembler, clang-format will very likely break the naming of register variables, as it sees the %-character as an operator.

asm_movq(%[val2], %%mm0)

will be reformatted as

asm_movq(% [val2], % % mm0)

which will no longer compile.

Constructing a Path in a macro

If you build up a path using macros without using strings, clang-format again will see the '/' character as an operator and will put spaces around it.

Boost e.g. uses a construct like this:

#   define AUX778076_PREPROCESSED_HEADER \
    BOOST_MPL_CFG_COMPILER_DIR/BOOST_MPL_PREPROCESSED_HEADER

to construct a path to a header file. The '/' is not an operator here, but as it is not inside a string, clang-format treats it as an operator and puts spaces around it, creating a different path. The include of the header file will obviously fail.

Conclusion

Yes, clang-format can break your code. If you are using very specific constructs that are edge cases or outside of the language standard or simply extensions of your very specific compiler (which is not clang), then you will need to check the changes made by clang-format. Otherwise you risk getting hidden errors.

-1

In addition to the scenarios described in other answers, -sort-includes may break projects that use precompiled-headers. As indicated in gcc documentation:

A precompiled header cannot be used once the first C token is seen.

Same applies for Visual Studio.

In practice it usually means the precompiled header has to be the first included header file. If you let clang-format to sort them for you, then there is a very high chance your compilation will be broken when the precompiled header becomes not the first included file.


You can deal with it by naming your PCH file something like 0000000000000000000000_pch.h, but I think I've made my point about the issue with such ridiculous example 😉.

-5

I imagine it would not, given that it is built on clang's static analysis, and therefore has knowledge of the structure of code itself, rather than just a dumb source code formatter that operates on the text alone(one of the boons of being able to use a compiler library). Given that the formatter uses the same parser and lexer as the compiler itself, I'd feel safe enough that it wouldn't have any issue spitting out code that behaves the same as what you feed it.

You can see the source code for the C++ formatter here: http://clang.llvm.org/doxygen/Format_8cpp_source.html

1
  • Several clang-tidy plugins break code, but are built on clang's static analysis, use the same technology as the compiler itself, etc.
    – TooTone
    Feb 22 '17 at 10:46

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