48

I want to append our application version with the build number. For example, 1.3.0.201606071.

When setting this in the AssemblyInfo, I get the following compilation error:

Error CS7034 The specified version string does not conform to the required format - major[.minor[.build[.revision]]]

Assembly info:

[assembly:System.Reflection.AssemblyFileVersionAttribute("1.0.0.201606071")]
[assembly:System.Reflection.AssemblyVersionAttribute("1.0.0.201606071")]
[assembly:System.Reflection.AssemblyInformationalVersionAttribute("1.0.0.201606071")]

Why would this be happening?

  • 6
    Note: AssemblyInformationalVersionAttribute does not have restrictions as mentioned in the answers. – leppie Jun 21 '16 at 10:03
  • 2
    We ran into this same problem, and just ended up formatting our date like a version (ex. 2017.12.20.1234, where 1234 is our build number) – neumann1990 Dec 20 '17 at 17:55
48
0

The maximum value for either of the parts is 65534, as you read here. This is a limit imposed by the operating system, so not even specific to .NET. Windows puts the version numbers into two integers, which together form four unsigned shorts.

Adding some metadata to it (for the * option I guess) makes the maximum allowed value UInt16.MaxValue - 1 = 65534 (Thanks to Gary Walker for noticing):

All components of the version must be integers greater than or equal to 0. Metadata restricts the major, minor, build, and revision components for an assembly to a maximum value of UInt16.MaxValue - 1. If a component exceeds this value, a compilation error occurs.

Your 201606071 exceeds this limit.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    I'm experiencing this issue when trying to set a star value (1.0.*) in a .NET Core project with the new csproj format file, having set GenerateAssemblyInfo to false. Any ideas? I'm looking to achieve auto increment in .NET Core / Standard projects of the new csproj format file. – Shimmy Weitzhandler Oct 10 '17 at 9:01
  • 1
    No, I am sorry. Please ask a new question @Shimmy – Patrick Hofman Oct 10 '17 at 9:05
  • 2
    @Shimmy Did you end up asking that question? What did you find out? – jrh Dec 19 '17 at 15:42
12
0

If you are targeting netcoreapp2.0 and don't have AssemblyInfo.cs at all you can fix

error CS7034: The specified version string does not conform to the required format

by adding this into your .csproj file:

<PropertyGroup>
  <GenerateAssemblyInfo>False</GenerateAssemblyInfo>
  <Deterministic>False</Deterministic>
</PropertyGroup>
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  • For me the problem was that my .csproj file contained <Deterministic>true</Deterministic> but I was targetting .Net 4.0 as well. I removed this and the compiler worked once more. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction. – Dan Atkinson Oct 22 '19 at 8:40
8
0

It's because each number in the version is a ushort! That's a pity.

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2
0

In the .csproj file you must set Deterministic to false. Then accepts the compiler a '*' in the Build or Revision.

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1
0

This limitation only applies to the Assembly and File version so if you are using .Net Core 2.x you can get around this limitation by settings a separate version of each in the csproj.

</PropertyGroup>
    <VersionPrefix>1.1.1.9000001</VersionPrefix>
    <VersionSuffix>$(VersionSuffix)</VersionSuffix>
    <AssemblyVersion>1.1.1.0</AssemblyVersion>
    <FileVersion>1.1.1.0</FileVersion>
</PropertyGroup>
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