5

I'm curious about the impact of inheritance in non-polymorphic classes. Specifically, I am writing two smart pointer classes, neither with virtual methods, and both for very unique purposes. Since the basic operator overloads and some standard functions are identical, and they only need one member variable, I figured I could use a base class to reuse code. Here's a simple mockup of what I mean:

The base class:

template <class T>
class Pointer_Impl
{
public:
    T & operator*() { return this->*m_pointer; }
    // etc.
protected:
    T *m_pointer;
    //protected to prevent instantiation without using = delete
    Pointer_Impl() {}
    Pointer_Impl(T *) {}
    //other constructors, assignment and move operators, destructor here
};

And then:

template <class T>
class PointerA : public Pointer_Impl<T>
{
public:
    PointerA() { m_pointer = nullptr; }
    PointerA(T * obj) { m_pointer = obj; }
    // other constructors, assignment and move operators, destructor, and any other class-specific functions here
};

The question: Is there any overhead in memory or performance in deriving from a base class lacking any virtual methods? Since it's a smart pointer implementation, lean and mean is what I'm looking for.

My gut says no, there is no concern, but I'd like to be certain from wiser minds.

  • Since it's a smart pointer implementation, lean and mean is what I'm looking for. Raw pointers are probably leaner than smart pointers. They're certainly meaner... – erip Jun 21 '16 at 10:35
  • @erip Of course raw pointers will always be faster, but I'd like as fast as possible with the lowest overhead possible. Otherwise, what's the point of a smart pointer? – Jon Harper Jun 21 '16 at 10:38
  • There are several typos, missing semicolons, wrong variable names, and also, PointerA cannot create the base subobject instance if the constructor is private. – eerorika Jun 21 '16 at 10:41
  • @user2079303 It's a "simple mockup" to get the point across. I'll review for typos. – Jon Harper Jun 21 '16 at 10:42
  • 1
    @JonHarper I was thinking in the lines of looking at assembly :) Anyway, you cannot initialize members of parent like that. You must invoke parent constructor instead. – eerorika Jun 21 '16 at 10:52
8

Performance impact

None. Without virtual (either virtual inheritance or virtual functions) you won't incur any runtime penalties for using a base class. The name resolution is performed entirely at compile time using the static types.

Memory impact

None. In the absence of virtual, there's no meaningful difference between a class that inherits and one that has the same fields directly as members. This all changes if you have multiple base classes or virtual (inheritance or functions).

Compilation impact

There may be some impact on the time taken to compile; the compiler will have to keep track of more names and template instantiations. This is sometimes a concern for large, template-heavy codebases.

  • 1
    Beautiful. If no one comes along with a sledgehammer of an issue, this is exactly what I needed. – Jon Harper Jun 21 '16 at 10:50
5

Your subclass's constructor suggests that the subclass contains at least one additional member, m_object, which you did not show.

Without any virtual methods, at runtime there's no difference between the object consisting of a superclass and a subclass, versus an object that consists of a single class, with typical C++ implementations. After all, creating a subclass ends up creating a new class. So, a single class containing all members of your base class and a subclass is indistinguishable at runtime from a single class, as long as all class members are the same, laid out in the same order, and there's no virtual inheritance involved.

Of course, the compiler has to do a little bit more work keeping track of both the superclass and the subclass, so there's probably a little bit of additional work that the compiler has to do, keeping track of two separate classes, instead of one. But unless the code base is huge, I doubt that the difference in performance could be measured, at all.

  • Oops. That should read m_pointer, not m_object. I'll fix the code. – Jon Harper Jun 21 '16 at 10:40
  • In that case, what you have will not work, as is. A subclass cannot construct a superclass's members. – Sam Varshavchik Jun 21 '16 at 11:15
4

No run time performance penalty of any kind (if optimized. Obviously a debug build may store some data about the inheritance).

As a evidence, observe the output of following programs

prog1:

template <class T>
class PointerA
{
public:
    PointerA(T * obj) : m_pointer(obj) {}
    T & operator*() { return *this->m_pointer; }
    T *m_pointer;
};

prog2:

template <class T>
class Pointer_Impl
{
public:
    T & operator*() { return *this->m_pointer; }
protected:
    T *m_pointer;
    Pointer_Impl(T *) {}
};

template <class T>
class PointerA : public Pointer_Impl<T>
{
public:
    PointerA(T * obj) : Pointer_Impl<T>(obj) {}
};

common main:

int main() {
    PointerA<int> p(new int);
    volatile int i = 42;
    *p = i;
    i = *p;
}

Both produce the same assembly:

main:
        subq    $24, %rsp
        movl    $4, %edi
        call    operator new(unsigned long)
        movl    $42, 12(%rsp)
        movl    12(%rsp), %eax
        movl    %eax, 12(%rsp)
        movl    $0, %eax
        addq    $24, %rsp
        ret
  • 2
    You folks are great. I didn't expect an actual assembly comparison. – Jon Harper Jun 21 '16 at 11:05

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