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I am currently implementing a system and I have a question regarding the interaction between different elements in the system with the class that interacts directly with the database (the one opening and closing connections, executing sql queries, etc).

So far, my Business Logic Layer is deferring the construction of all SQL queries (depending on certain inputs) to my Database Access Layer, which in turn would call the database-handling class to execute each query. Note that right above my Business Logic Layer is the GUI.

The question is: would it be bad practice to include the construction of SQL queries in the Business Logic Layer? I am asking this because I need to implement a procedure that gets data from database DB1, manipulates it, and then writes it into DB2. Thus I find that hardcoding these SQL queries would be easier to keep in my business layer.

Please let me know your thoughts and if this is a clean design to some extent from an architectural point of view, or if I should include this logic all in my Database Access Layer.

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    You have introduced a dependency on the actual data store. If it will always be SQL then OK but you have violated the DAL. – paparazzo Jun 21 '16 at 12:39
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would it be bad practice to include the construction of SQL queries in the Business Logic Layer?

Most likely. The business layer should generally be database-agnostic.

I need to implement a procedure that gets data from database DB1, manipulates it, and then writes it into DB2

So you need two data layer objects - one to get the data from DB1 and one to save it in DB2. The "manipulation" can be done in either place (business layer or data layer), depending on the nature of the manipulation. For example, is it purely a data conversion, or does it depend on other aspects of the business layer?

  • it largely depends on manipulation of data based on some analytics, so not just simply data conversion. – Adam Jun 21 '16 at 13:47
  • Then business layer may be appropriate for the conversion aspect. – D Stanley Jun 21 '16 at 13:48
  • so this means that I should have two instantiations of the DAL class, or should I define two different DAL classes one for each database (they would have slightly different functionality I suppose)? – Adam Jun 21 '16 at 13:49
  • It depends on how different they are - are they different repositories or copies of the same repository (e.g. live/archive, prod/test, etc.) Generally you want one class for each repository, but you can have two instances that just point to different databases if everything else is the same. – D Stanley Jun 21 '16 at 14:02
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You don't need to bring this logic to Business layer at all.

Follow this steps

  1. Request data from DB1 from the business layer
  2. Data Access Layer returns the Data from DB1 to Business Layer
  3. Manipulate the Data in Business Layer. (Calculations, transformations and what not)
  4. Request the Data Acess Layer to insert this new Data to DB2 and pass along the processed data to Data Access Layer
  5. Data Access Layer writes to DB2

This way is more elegant and you can keep your current architecture unchanged.

EDIT

You can create a separate Data Access Layer for accessing DB2 and have the Business layer call it on step 4. That way you can keep Data access layers more coherent.

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