569

I have two components.

  1. Parent component
  2. Child component

I was trying to call child's method from Parent, I tried this way but couldn't get a result

class Parent extends Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <Child>
        <button onClick={Child.getAlert()}>Click</button>
      </Child>
      );
    }
  }

class Child extends Component {
  getAlert() {
    alert('clicked');
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <h1 ref="hello">Hello</h1>
    );
  }
}

Is there a way to call child's method from the parent ?

Note: Child and Parent components are in two different files

  • Although I'm very late to this, I'm also learning React so I would like to know about the case in which a parent would need to call child method. Would you please explain? – Akshay Raut Nov 26 '19 at 8:22
  • 1
    @AkshayRaut IMO a good use-case: a general purpose form with reset and submit functions, the later of which returns the form values. – Julian K May 12 at 0:21

16 Answers 16

833

First off, let me express that this is generally not the way to go about things in React land. Usually what you want to do is pass down functionality to children in props, and pass up notifications from children in events (or better yet: dispatch).

But if you must expose an imperative method on a child component, you can use refs. Remember this is an escape hatch and usually indicates a better design is available.

Previously, refs were only supported for Class-based components. With the advent of React Hooks, that's no longer the case

Using Hooks and Function Components (>= react@16.8)

const { forwardRef, useRef, useImperativeHandle } = React;

// We need to wrap component in `forwardRef` in order to gain
// access to the ref object that is assigned using the `ref` prop.
// This ref is passed as the second parameter to the function component.
const Child = forwardRef((props, ref) => {

  // The component instance will be extended
  // with whatever you return from the callback passed
  // as the second argument
  useImperativeHandle(ref, () => ({

    getAlert() {
      alert("getAlert from Child");
    }

  }));

  return <h1>Hi</h1>;
});

const Parent = () => {
  // In order to gain access to the child component instance,
  // you need to assign it to a `ref`, so we call `useRef()` to get one
  const childRef = useRef();

  return (
    <div>
      <Child ref={childRef} />
      <button onClick={() => childRef.current.getAlert()}>Click</button>
    </div>
  );
};

ReactDOM.render(
  <Parent />,
  document.getElementById('root')
);
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js" crossorigin></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js" crossorigin></script>

<div id="root"></div>

Documentation for useImperativeHandle() is here:

useImperativeHandle customizes the instance value that is exposed to parent components when using ref.

Using Class Components (>= react@16.4)

const { Component } = React;

class Parent extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.child = React.createRef();
  }

  onClick = () => {
    this.child.current.getAlert();
  };

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <Child ref={this.child} />
        <button onClick={this.onClick}>Click</button>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

class Child extends Component {
  getAlert() {
    alert('getAlert from Child');
  }

  render() {
    return <h1>Hello</h1>;
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<Parent />, document.getElementById('root'));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js" crossorigin></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js" crossorigin></script>
<div id="root"></div>

Legacy API (<= react@16.3)

For historical purposes, here's the callback-based style you'd use with React versions before 16.3:

const { Component } = React;
const { render } = ReactDOM;

class Parent extends Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <Child ref={instance => { this.child = instance; }} />
        <button onClick={() => { this.child.getAlert(); }}>Click</button>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

class Child extends Component {
  getAlert() {
    alert('clicked');
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <h1>Hello</h1>
    );
  }
}


render(
  <Parent />,
  document.getElementById('app')
);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

| improve this answer | |
  • 23
    I tired, but end up with this error "_this2.refs.child.getAlert is not a function" – N8FURY Jun 21 '16 at 17:58
  • 23
    That's because connect returns a higher order component that wraps your original instance. You'll need to call getWrappedInstance() on the connected component first to get your original component. Then you can call instance methods on that. – rossipedia Dec 25 '16 at 19:07
  • 18
    This is not really a good pattern. Not to mention string refs are frowned upon. It's better to pass props into the child component and then have a button click in the parent change the parent's state, and pass a state item into the child which will trigger the child's componentWillReceiveProps, and use that as a trigger. – ffxsam Mar 30 '17 at 16:41
  • 10
    No, it's not usually the best pattern, it's more of an escape hatch when you need it, and should be used only in emergencies. Also, this answer was written when string refs were still around, and you're right that they're not the "correct" way of doing things these days. – rossipedia Mar 30 '17 at 17:58
  • 49
    If best practice is to create a maze of logic to do something as simple as calling a child component's method - then I disagree with best practice. – aaaaaa Dec 3 '18 at 17:47
164

You can use another pattern here:

class Parent extends Component {
 render() {
  return (
    <div>
      <Child setClick={click => this.clickChild = click}/>
      <button onClick={() => this.clickChild()}>Click</button>
    </div>
  );
 }
}

class Child extends Component {
 constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.getAlert = this.getAlert.bind(this);
 }
 componentDidMount() {
    this.props.setClick(this.getAlert);
 }
 getAlert() {
    alert('clicked');
 }
 render() {
  return (
    <h1 ref="hello">Hello</h1>
  );
 }
}

What it does is to set the parent's clickChild method when child is mounted. In this way when you click the button in parent it will call clickChild which calls child's getAlert.

This also works if your child is wrapped with connect() so you don't need the getWrappedInstance() hack.

Note you can't use onClick={this.clickChild} in parent because when parent is rendered child is not mounted so this.clickChild is not assigned yet. Using onClick={() => this.clickChild()} is fine because when you click the button this.clickChild should already be assigned.

| improve this answer | |
37

Alternative method with useEffect:

Parent:

const [refresh, doRefresh] = useState(0);
<Button onClick={() => doRefresh(prev => prev + 1)} />
<Children refresh={refresh} />

Children:

useEffect(() => {
    performRefresh(); //children function of interest
  }, [props.refresh]);
| improve this answer | |
  • Ps. If your desire is just to re-render the form (for example, to reset the input fields) then you don't even need to include the useEffect, you can just make the prop being sent into the component change – Matt Fletcher Jun 8 at 11:07
  • @tonymayoral Is there a way we can have useState inside Child component and use doRefresh from Parent. In my case i do not want my Parent to re-render. – Neel Dsouza Oct 26 at 7:09
30

https://facebook.github.io/react/tips/expose-component-functions.html for more answers ref here Call methods on React children components

By looking into the refs of the "reason" component, you're breaking encapsulation and making it impossible to refactor that component without carefully examining all the places it's used. Because of this, we strongly recommend treating refs as private to a component, much like state.

In general, data should be passed down the tree via props. There are a few exceptions to this (such as calling .focus() or triggering a one-time animation that doesn't really "change" the state) but any time you're exposing a method called "set", props are usually a better choice. Try to make it so that the inner input component worries about its size and appearance so that none of its ancestors do.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Here is the source of this answer: discuss.reactjs.org/t/…. No problems with citing others, but at least put in some reference. – Jodo Oct 11 '17 at 7:46
  • 4
    How exactly does this break encapsulation any more than props? – Timmmm Jan 31 at 16:47
9

We can use refs in another way as-

We are going to create a Parent element, it will render a <Child/> component. As you can see, the component that will be rendered, you need to add the ref attribute and provide a name for it.
Then, the triggerChildAlert function, located in the parent class will access the refs property of the this context (when the triggerChildAlert function is triggered will access the child reference and it will has all the functions of the child element).

class Parent extends React.Component {
    triggerChildAlert(){
        this.refs.child.callChildMethod();
        // to get child parent returned  value-
        // this.value = this.refs.child.callChildMethod();
        // alert('Returned value- '+this.value);
    }

    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                {/* Note that you need to give a value to the ref parameter, in this case child*/}
                <Child ref="child" />
                <button onClick={this.triggerChildAlert}>Click</button>
            </div>
        );
    }
}  

Now, the child component, as theoretically designed previously, will look like:

class Child extends React.Component {
    callChildMethod() {
        alert('Hello World');
        // to return some value
        // return this.state.someValue;
    }

    render() {
        return (
            <h1>Hello</h1>
        );
    }
}

Here is the source code-
Hope will help you !

| improve this answer | |
6

If you are doing this simply because you want the Child to provide a re-usable trait to its parents, then you might consider doing that using render-props instead.

That technique actually turns the structure upside down. The Child now wraps the parent, so I have renamed it to AlertTrait below. I kept the name Parent for continuity, although it is not really a parent now.

// Use it like this:

  <AlertTrait renderComponent={Parent}/>


class AlertTrait extends Component {
  // You will need to bind this function, if it uses 'this'
  doAlert() {
    alert('clicked');
  }
  render() {
    return this.props.renderComponent({ doAlert: this.doAlert });
  }
}

class Parent extends Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <button onClick={this.props.doAlert}>Click</button>
    );
  }
}

In this case, the AlertTrait provides one or more traits which it passes down as props to whatever component it was given in its renderComponent prop.

The Parent receives doAlert as a prop, and can call it when needed.

(For clarity, I called the prop renderComponent in the above example. But in the React docs linked above, they just call it render.)

The Trait component can render stuff surrounding the Parent, in its render function, but it does not render anything inside the parent. Actually it could render things inside the Parent, if it passed another prop (e.g. renderChild) to the parent, which the parent could then use during its render method.

This is somewhat different from what the OP asked for, but some people might end up here (like we did) because they wanted to create a reusable trait, and thought that a child component was a good way to do that.

| improve this answer | |
  • There is a handy list of patterns for creating re-usable traits here: reactjs.org/blog/2016/07/13/… – joeytwiddle Oct 22 '18 at 8:57
  • What if you have N stopwatches and one button to restart them all. How does render props handy here? – vsync Mar 26 '19 at 19:23
  • @vsync I'm not sure that this method can help for your task. But brickingup's answer might help. Note that they set this.clickChild = click but your multiple stopwatches would pass multiple functions, so you would need to store all of them: this.watchRestartFuncs[watchId] = restartWatch – joeytwiddle Mar 27 '19 at 3:33
4

I wasn't satisfied with any of the solutions presented here. There is actually a very simple solution that can be done using pure Javascript without relying upon some React functionality other than the basic props object - and it gives you the benefit of communicating in either direction (parent -> child, child -> parent). You need to pass an object from the parent component to the child component. This object is what I refer to as a "bi-directional reference" or biRef for short. Basically, the object contains a reference to methods in the parent that the parent wants to expose. And the child component attaches methods to the object that the parent can call. Something like this:

// Parent component.
function MyParentComponent(props) {

   function someParentFunction() {
      // The child component can call this function.
   }

   function onButtonClick() {
       // Call the function inside the child component.
       biRef.someChildFunction();
   }

   // Add all the functions here that the child can call.
   var biRef = {
      someParentFunction: someParentFunction
   }

   return <div>
       <MyChildComponent biRef={biRef} />
       <Button onClick={onButtonClick} />
   </div>;
}


// Child component
function MyChildComponent(props) {

   function someChildFunction() {
      // The parent component can call this function.
   }


   function onButtonClick() {
      // Call the parent function.
      props.biRef.someParentFunction();
   }

   // Add all the child functions to props.biRef that you want the parent
   // to be able to call.
   props.biRef.someChildFunction = someChildFunction;

   return <div>
       <Button onClick={onButtonClick} />
   </div>;
}

The other advantage to this solution is that you can add a lot more functions in the parent and child while passing them from the parent to the child using only a single property.

An improvement over the code above is to not add the parent and child functions directly to the biRef object but rather to sub members. Parent functions should be added to a member called "parent" while the child functions should be added to a member called "child".

// Parent component.
function MyParentComponent(props) {

   function someParentFunction() {
      // The child component can call this function.
   }

   function onButtonClick() {
       // Call the function inside the child component.
       biRef.child.someChildFunction();
   }

   // Add all the functions here that the child can call.
   var biRef = {
      parent: {
          someParentFunction: someParentFunction
      }
   }

   return <div>
       <MyChildComponent biRef={biRef} />
       <Button onClick={onButtonClick} />
   </div>;
}


// Child component
function MyChildComponent(props) {

   function someChildFunction() {
      // The parent component can call this function.
   }


   function onButtonClick() {
      // Call the parent function.
      props.biRef.parent.someParentFunction();
   }

   // Add all the child functions to props.biRef that you want the parent
   // to be able to call.
   props.biRef {
       child: {
            someChildFunction: someChildFunction
       }
   }

   return <div>
       <Button onClick={onButtonClick} />
   </div>;
}

By placing parent and child functions into separate members of the biRef object, you 'll have a clean separation between the two and easily see which ones belong to parent or child. It also helps to prevent a child component from accidentally overwriting a parent function if the same function appears in both.

One last thing is that if you note, the parent component creates the biRef object with var whereas the child component accesses it through the props object. It might be tempting to not define the biRef object in the parent and access it from its parent through its own props parameter (which might be the case in a hierarchy of UI elements). This is risky because the child may think a function it is calling on the parent belongs to the parent when it might actually belong to a grandparent. There's nothing wrong with this as long as you are aware of it. Unless you have a reason for supporting some hierarchy beyond a parent/child relationship, it's best to create the biRef in your parent component.

| improve this answer | |
3

I hope I'm not repeating anything from above but what about passing a callback prop that sets the function in the parent? This works and is pretty easy. (Added code is between the ////'s)

class Parent extends Component {
  ///// 
  getAlert = () => {} // initial value for getAlert

  setGetAlertMethod = (newMethod) => {
    this.getAlert = newMethod;
  }
  /////

  render() {
    return (
      <Child setGetAlertMethod={this.setGetAlertMethod}>
        <button onClick={this.getAlert}>Click</button>
      </Child>
      );
    }
  }



class Child extends Component {
  /////
  componentDidMount() {
    this.props.setGetAlertMethod(this.getAlert);
  }
  /////

  getAlert() => {
    alert('clicked');
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <h1 ref="hello">Hello</h1>
    );
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

You can achieve this easily in this way

Steps-

  1. Create a boolean variable in the state in the parent class. Update this when you want to call a function.
  2. Create a prop variable and assign the boolean variable.
  3. From the child component access that variable using props and execute the method you want by having an if condition.

    class Child extends Component {
       Method=()=>{
       --Your method body--
       }
       render() {
         return (
        //check whether the variable has been updated or not
          if(this.props.updateMethod){
            this.Method();
          }
         )
       }
    }
    
    class Parent extends Component {
    
    constructor(){
      this.state={
       callMethod:false
      }
    
    }
    render() {
       return (
    
         //update state according to your requirement
         this.setState({
            callMethod:true
         }}
         <Child updateMethod={this.state.callMethod}></Child>
        );
       }
    }
    
| improve this answer | |
  • You might want to sandbox this. It looks like you're going to end up with an infinite loop because child method will continually run because parent state is set to true. – Isaac Pak Jun 3 '19 at 13:57
  • @IsaacPak Yeah, that's why I left a comment there, saying you must update the state according to your requirement. Then it won't run as an infinite loop. – Kusal Kithmal Jun 4 '19 at 3:39
1

I'm using useEffect hook to overcome the headache of doing all this so now I pass a variable down to child like this:

<ParentComponent>
 <ChildComponent arbitrary={value} />
</ParentComponent>
useEffect(() => callTheFunctionToBeCalled(value) , [value]);
| improve this answer | |
1

Here my demo: https://stackblitz.com/edit/react-dgz1ee?file=styles.css

I am using useEffect to call the children component's methods. I have tried with Proxy and Setter_Getter but sor far useEffect seems to be the more convenient way to call a child method from parent. To use Proxy and Setter_Getter it seems there is some subtlety to overcome first, because the element firstly rendered is an objectLike's element through the ref.current return => <div/>'s specificity. Concerning useEffect, you can also leverage on this approach to set the parent's state depending on what you want to do with the children.

In the demo's link I have provided, you will find my full ReactJS' code with my draftwork inside's so you can appreciate the workflow of my solution.

Here I am providing you my ReactJS' snippet with the relevant code only. :

import React, {
  Component,
  createRef,
  forwardRef,
  useState,
  useEffect
} from "react"; 

{...}

// Child component
// I am defining here a forwardRef's element to get the Child's methods from the parent
// through the ref's element.
let Child = forwardRef((props, ref) => {
  // I am fetching the parent's method here
  // that allows me to connect the parent and the child's components
  let { validateChildren } = props;
  // I am initializing the state of the children
  // good if we can even leverage on the functional children's state
  let initialState = {
    one: "hello world",
    two: () => {
      console.log("I am accessing child method from parent :].");
      return "child method achieve";
    }
  };
  // useState initialization
  const [componentState, setComponentState] = useState(initialState);
  // useEffect will allow me to communicate with the parent
  // through a lifecycle data flow
  useEffect(() => {
    ref.current = { componentState };
    validateChildren(ref.current.componentState.two);
  });

{...}

});

{...}

// Parent component
class App extends Component {
  // initialize the ref inside the constructor element
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.childRef = createRef();
  }

  // I am implementing a parent's method
  // in child useEffect's method
  validateChildren = childrenMethod => {
    // access children method from parent
    childrenMethod();
    // or signaling children is ready
    console.log("children active");
  };

{...}
render(){
       return (
          {
            // I am referencing the children
            // also I am implementing the parent logic connector's function
            // in the child, here => this.validateChildren's function
          }
          <Child ref={this.childRef} validateChildren={this.validateChildren} />
        </div>
       )
}
| improve this answer | |
1

We're happy with a custom hook we call useCounterKey. It just sets up a counterKey, or a key that counts up from zero. The function it returns resets the key (i.e. increment). (I believe this is the most idiomatic way in React to reset a component - just bump the key.)

However this hook also works in any situation where you want to send a one-time message to the client to do something. E.g. we use it to focus a control in the child on a certain parent event - it just autofocuses anytime the key is updated. (If more props are needed they could be set prior to resetting the key so they're available when the event happens.)

This method has a bit of a learning curve b/c it's not as straightforward as a typical event handler, but it seems the most idiomatic way to handle this in React that we've found (since keys already function this way). Def open to feedback on this method but it is working well!

// Main helper hook:
export function useCounterKey() {
  const [key, setKey] = useState(0);
  return [key, () => setKey(prev => prev + 1)] as const;
}

Sample usages:

// Sample 1 - normal React, just reset a control by changing Key on demand
function Sample1() {
  const [inputLineCounterKey, resetInputLine] = useCounterKey();

  return <>
    <InputLine key={inputLineCounterKey} />
    <button onClick={() => resetInputLine()} />
  <>;
}

// Second sample - anytime the counterKey is incremented, child calls focus() on the input
function Sample2() {
  const [amountFocusCounterKey, focusAmountInput] = useCounterKey();

  // ... call focusAmountInput in some hook or event handler as needed

  return <WorkoutAmountInput focusCounterKey={amountFocusCounterKey} />
}

function WorkoutAmountInput(props) {
  useEffect(() => {
    if (counterKey > 0) {
      // Don't focus initially
      focusAmount();
    }
  }, [counterKey]);

  // ...
}

(Credit to Kent Dodds for the counterKey concept.)

| improve this answer | |
0

You can make Inheritance Inversion (look it up here: https://medium.com/@franleplant/react-higher-order-components-in-depth-cf9032ee6c3e). That way you have access to instance of the component that you would be wrapping (thus you'll be able to access it's functions)

| improve this answer | |
0

I think that the most basic way to call methods is by setting a request on the child component. Then as soon as the child handles the request, it calls a callback method to reset the request.

The reset mechanism is necessary to be able to send the same request multiple times after each other.

In parent component

In the render method of the parent:

const { request } = this.state;
return (<Child request={request} onRequestHandled={()->resetRequest()}/>);

The parent needs 2 methods, to communicate with its child in 2 directions.

sendRequest() {
  const request = { param: "value" };
  this.setState({ request });
}

resetRequest() {
  const request = null;
  this.setState({ request });
}

In child component

The child updates its internal state, copying the request from the props.

constructor(props) {
  super(props);
  const { request } = props;
  this.state = { request };
}

static getDerivedStateFromProps(props, state) {
  const { request } = props;
  if (request !== state.request ) return { request };
  return null;
}

Then finally it handles the request, and sends the reset to the parent:

componentDidMount() {
  const { request } = this.state;
  // todo handle request.

  const { onRequestHandled } = this.props;
  if (onRequestHandled != null) onRequestHandled();
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Another way of triggering a child function from parent is to make use of the componentDidUpdate function in child Component. I pass a prop triggerChildFunc from Parent to Child, which initially is null. The value changes to a function when the button is clicked and Child notice that change in componentDidUpdate and calls its own internal function.

Since prop triggerChildFunc changes to a function, we also get a callback to the Parent. If Parent don't need to know when the function is called the value triggerChildFunc could for example change from null to true instead.

const { Component } = React;
const { render } = ReactDOM;

class Parent extends Component {
  state = {
    triggerFunc: null
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <Child triggerChildFunc={this.state.triggerFunc} />
        <button onClick={() => {
          this.setState({ triggerFunc: () => alert('Callback in parent')})
        }}>Click
        </button>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

class Child extends Component {
  componentDidUpdate(prevProps) {
    if (this.props.triggerChildFunc !== prevProps.triggerChildFunc) {
      this.onParentTrigger();
    }
  }

  onParentTrigger() {
    alert('parent triggered me');

    // Let's call the passed variable from parent if it's a function
    if (this.props.triggerChildFunc && {}.toString.call(this.props.triggerChildFunc) === '[object Function]') {
      this.props.triggerChildFunc();
    }
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <h1>Hello</h1>
    );
  }
}


render(
  <Parent />,
  document.getElementById('app')
);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.6.3/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.6.3/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>
<div id='app'></div>

CodePen: https://codepen.io/calsal/pen/NWPxbJv?editors=1010

| improve this answer | |
-1

Here's a bug? to look out for: I concur with rossipedia's solution using forwardRef, useRef, useImperativeHandle

There's some misinformation online that says refs can only be created from React Class components, but you can indeed use Function Components if you use the aforementioned hooks above. A note, the hooks only worked for me after I changed the file to not use withRouter() when exporting the component. I.e. a change from

export default withRouter(TableConfig);

to instead be

export default TableConfig;

In hindsight the withRouter() is not needed for such a component anyway, but usually it doesn't hurt anything having it in. My use case is that I created a component to create a Table to handle the viewing and editing of config values, and I wanted to be able to tell this Child component to reset it's state values whenever the Parent form's Reset button was hit. UseRef() wouldn't properly get the ref or ref.current (kept on getting null) until I removed withRouter() from the file containing my child component TableConfig

| improve this answer | |

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