4

Here is a minimal code example I use to explain my problem. The following code is organised in two files and compiles alright:

DataStruct.fs

module MyMod 
type XXX = {
    a: int
}
with
    static member GetNew =
        {
            a = -1
        }

type YYY = {
    a: float
}
with
    static member GetNew =
        {
            a = -1.0
        }


type Choice =
    | XXX of XXX
    | YYY of YYY

Program.fs

open MyMod

let generator = 
    let res = XXX.GetNew
    Choice.XXX res

let myVal : XXX = 
    match generator with
    | XXX x -> x
    | _ -> printfn "expected XXX, got sth else!"; XXX.GetNew

The interesting thing is that I have a Choice type that has two tags named the same way as the types they are tagging. This is, as far as I understand, a common convention in F#.

Now I change DataStruct such that I put it in a namespace and make MyMod just one of the modules in that namespace. Accordingly, in Program.fs I open the namespace and use everything prefixed with the module name:

DataStruct.fs

namespace DataStruct

module MyMod =
    type XXX = {
        a: int
    }
    with
        static member GetNew =
            {
                a = -1
            }

    type YYY = {
        a: float
    }
    with
        static member GetNew =
            {
                a = -1.0
            }


    type Choice =
        | XXX of XXX
        | YYY of YYY

Program.fs

open DataStruct

let generator = 
    let res = MyMod.XXX.GetNew
    MyMod.Choice.XXX res

let myVal : MyMod.XXX = 
    match generator with
    | MyMod.XXX x -> x
    | _ -> printfn "expected XXX, got sth else!"; MyMod.XXX.GetNew

Now Program.fs contains two errors. In the two lines where I try to call GetNew it says: "The field, constructor or member 'GetNew' is not defined" This is because MyMod.XXX is inferred to be a union case of type MyMod.Choice.

Now without changing any of the structure of my code, I simply rename the Choice tags to be different from the types that they represent and everything works fine again.

DataStruct.fs as above but with

type Choice =
    | TX of XXX
    | TY of YYY

Program.fs

open DataStruct

let generator = 
    let res = MyMod.XXX.GetNew
    MyMod.Choice.TX res

let myVal : MyMod.XXX = 
    match generator with
    | MyMod.TX x -> x
    | _ -> printfn "expected XXX, got sth else!"; MyMod.XXX.GetNew

Now the call to GetNew is legal since the MyMod.XXX is correctly inferred to be the type I intended to use.

The question is now: is the issue described above a bug or feature of F#? Or put differently, while it is advised to use the same names for tags and their types it seems to be a problem for the type inference mechanism. So is the advice a bad one or am I using namespaces, modules, types and tags in a bad way?

1
+50

This behaviour is a bug in the compiler. The issue is related to another bug in the compiler, where discriminated union types are shadowing other type definitions in the same module, see this bug report. In the code you had posted: The root cause of the bug is here in the name resolution. MyMod.XXX is identified as a valid expression that refers to a DU type. This search is done greedily, the codepath that searches for alternative resolutions is not executed.

I've submitted bug reports in visualfsharp and fsharp

  • Thank you for the effort, I hope this will be fixed soon. And I'm surprised a bit that not many more people have stumbled over this since such kind of use of discriminated union will appear frequently in F#, I believe. – Friedrich Gretz Jun 29 '16 at 11:14
  • @FriedrichGretz: thanks for the confirmation. Satisfactory for the bounty? – Anton Schwaighofer Jun 29 '16 at 12:31
5

The difference between your first and second piece of code is how you open the module in Program.fs:

  • In your first code, by writing open MyMod, you open the module

  • In your second version, by writing open DataStruct, you only open the namespace, but not yet the module. If you change that to open DataStruct.MyMod, you will get exactly the same behaviour as in the first version.

My rough explanation of what is going on:

  • With the module open, F# sees two XXX floating around, and is able to disambiguate based on use.
  • When you qualify with the module name, you are restricting XXX to be the latest type XXX that is defined in MyMod. The first XXX is your record, the second is a class derived from Choice that is also called XXX. Have a look at your assembly in something like ILSpy, for example.

UPDATE: Second paragraph is was incorrect. When qualified with the module name, the F# compiler incorrectly restricts XXX to be a DU type, shadowing the record type. See my second answer for more details.

  • Regarding the second point of your explanation: in the line "let myVal : MyMod.XXX" the XXX is correctly recognized as the type which contradicts that only the later declared MyMod.Choice.XXX is visible as XXX. – Friedrich Gretz Jun 22 '16 at 16:02
  • You're right, that's inconsistent with my explanation. Let me dig a little further. – Anton Schwaighofer Jun 23 '16 at 8:55

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