50

As you know, java.util.Objects is

This class consists of static utility methods for operating on objects.

One of such methods is Objects.isNull().

My understanding is that Objects.isNull() would remove the chance of accidentally assigning a null value to object by omitting the second =.

However, the API Note states:

This method exists to be used as a Predicate, filter(Objects::isNull)

Would there be any reason/circumstance for which I should use object == null over Objects.isNull() in an if statement?

Should Objects.isNull() be confined to Predicates exclusively?

  • 1
    If all you are worrying is accidental assignment, you can simply use if(null == variable) consistently… – Holger Jun 22 '16 at 16:36
  • 1
    @Holder, what accidental assignment is there to worry about? This is Java. You'll get a type error. – Louis Wasserman Jun 22 '16 at 17:35
  • 1
    @LouisWasserman Not if variable is a Boolean. – Alexis C. Jun 22 '16 at 18:27
  • 1
    @AlexisC, that'd be a concern in a tiny, tiny number of cases: your variable has to be a very specific type, and you have to make a very specific typo, and you can't be using any IDE or compiler analysis that would point that out for you (as almost all IDEs would). I'm quite comfortable not worrying about that case. – Louis Wasserman Jun 22 '16 at 18:28
  • 1
    At work, I have seen many instances of null==object. When I enquired, I was told that it was to prevent accidental null assignments. Based on comments and answers here provided, I would be inclined to believe that it is a mater of taste. – Lucas T Jun 23 '16 at 13:50
53

should use object == null over Objects.isNull() in a if statement?

If you look at the source code of IsNull method,

 /* Returns true if the provided reference is null otherwise returns false.*/

 public static boolean isNull(Object obj) {
     return obj == null;
 }

It is the same. There is no difference. So you can use it safely.

  • 7
    Yes, it can be used, but it may interfere with local flow analysis performed by a tool. I.e., with a plain "==", any flow analysis can see that dereference is not good in the then branch, but safe in an else branch. You'll get appropriate errors/warnings or nothing. With the indirection of calling isNull() that knowledge may be lost to the tool. – Stephan Herrmann Jun 25 '16 at 10:57
  • 1
    There IS a slight performance difference. Java checking for object null reference versus calling a static method will have a difference. And it reads slightly less clearly than just using == that we're all used to. – Kevin M Sep 27 '18 at 14:33
  • 1
    Is more semantic use == null in if, but isNull is great to use on lambda expressions. – Leonardo Ramos Duarte Nov 14 '18 at 10:09
34

Objects.isNull is intended for use within Java 8 lambda filtering.

It's much easier and clearer to write

.stream().filter(Objects::isNull) 

than to write

.stream().filter(x -> x == null).  

Within an if however either will work, the use of == null is probably easier to read but in the end it will boil down to a style preference.

10

Look at the source:

public static boolean isNull(Object obj) {
    return obj == null;
}

To check for null values, you can use:

  • Objects.isNull(myObject)
  • null == myObject // avoids assigning by typo
  • myObject == null // risk of typo

The fact that Objects.isNull is meant for Predicates does not prevent you from using it as above.

  • 1
    What do you mean by risk of typo? – Ashish Lohia Jul 12 '17 at 6:56
  • 2
    @AshishLohia by using = instead of == (wouldn't compile unless it's a nullable Boolean wrapper, yo be fair) – Mena Jul 12 '17 at 10:25
  • Thanks for clearing that. – Ashish Lohia Jul 13 '17 at 3:17
  • 3
    Risk of typo is the issue in C++ not in Java if (myObject = null) will result in the compilation error. You should always use myObject == null over null == myObject. – Tomas Marik Feb 23 '18 at 14:14
  • @TomasMarik as mentioned in my comment, the risk of typo is limited to nullable Boolean wrappers in Java. This is pretty rare indeed (and will give compiler warnings when an assignment to null is checked as if it were a condition), but not impossible. – Mena Feb 23 '18 at 14:29
3

Would there be any reason/circumstance for which I should use object == null over Objects.isNull() in a if statement?

Yes, one reason is to keep the code simple. Within if statement object == null is clear and well known. It can not lead to any misbehavior if for example there is a typo.

My understanding is that Objects.isNull() would remove the chance of accidentally assigning a null value to object by omitting the second =.

If there is an if (object = null) {} with omitted = it will not compile or it will generate warning in case of Boolean object! Actually there is no reason to use Objects.isNull(object) over object == null within if statement. Here are the two variants side by side:

if (object == null) {
}

if (Objects.isNull(object)) {
}

Should Objects.isNull() be confined to Predicates exclusively?

It could be said yes, it is confined to Predicates exclusively, although there is no technical hurdle to use the Objects.isNull() everywhere.

From the public static boolean isNull(Object obj) method's javadoc:

@apiNoteThis method exists to be used as a java.util.function.Predicate, filter(Objects::isNull)

So if you use the method as not a predicate you are actually using a more complex and cumbersome expression compared to the simple object == null.

Here is a snippet to compare the benefit of Objects.isNull(object)

List<String> list = Arrays.asList("a", "b", null, "c", null);

// As ready-made predicate
long countNullsWithPredicate = list.stream().filter(Objects::isNull).count();

// Lambda
long countNullsWithLambda = list.stream().filter(object -> object == null).count();

// Reimplement the Objects::isNull predicate
long countNullsWithAnonymous = list.stream().filter(new Predicate<Object>() {
    @Override
    public boolean test(Object obj) {
        return obj == null;
    }
}).count();

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.