2

How can this be achieved in Ruby? Can it be done without repeating the variable? Javascript:

b = a || 7

This assigns a if a is not 0 and 7 otherwise

One specific case is converting date.wday to 7 if it returns 0 (Sunday).

  • I'm not sure, but maybe [date.wday, 7].detect { i != 0 } – Washington Guedes Jun 22 '16 at 16:37
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    Given that 0 is not falsey in Ruby it's logically impossible to get what you want. You would have to perform at least one comparison before using the value. – Mike Cluck Jun 22 '16 at 16:45
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    Regarding your original question: just use cwday (instead of wday) – it returns 7 (instead of 0) if the date is a Sunday ;-) – Stefan Jun 22 '16 at 16:51
  • wait... Must you use a Date method like wday or not? – victorf Jun 22 '16 at 17:29
  • I had to convert to datetime first, but cwday solved my case. – Aurimas Jun 22 '16 at 17:34
6

Just out of curiosity:

class Object
  def javascript_or?(other)
    (is_a?(FalseClass) || nil? || '' == self || 0 == self) ? nil : self
  end
end

and:

a = b.javascript_or?(7)
  • 3
    Readers: mudsie has gone off his medication. – Cary Swoveland Jun 22 '16 at 17:25
  • Aye. It’s time to get my pills, thanks @CarySwoveland for the reminder! See ya all tomorrow. – Aleksei Matiushkin Jun 22 '16 at 17:28
  • Rubyist will to power – victorf Jun 22 '16 at 17:42
  • Could also case self which might be faster than this chain of || operators. – tadman Jun 22 '16 at 17:51
  • @tadman Yeah, I thought about it (though I doubt it could be any faster,) but I on purpose made this answer as cryptic as possible. – Aleksei Matiushkin Jun 22 '16 at 18:33
6

There are only two falsy values in Ruby: nil and false. So, if you really want this approach

a = b == 0 ? 7 : b

is a plausible solution, because 0 can't be evaluated as false.

However, a better option for your need is cwday, and not wday. Then you don't need to make this comparison anymore, because it returns 1 for Monday, 2 for Tuesday, and finally 7 for Sunday, as you need.

date = Date.new(2016,19,6) # => Jun 19 2016, Sunday
date.cwday # => 7
  • @CarySwoveland it's because you already have a 5-digit reputation here, Cary (; I'm just hi-lighting the most important part. – victorf Jun 22 '16 at 17:17
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    Frankly, I have a 3 digits (and one decimal point, though,) but I don’t need the bold face either. – Aleksei Matiushkin Jun 22 '16 at 17:30
  • OK, as this honorable community wants! – victorf Jun 22 '16 at 17:34
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    For the sake of entropy constancy I upvoted it to give 10 rep more :) – Aleksei Matiushkin Jun 22 '16 at 17:34
3

For the particular case of 0 and 7:

a = (b + 6) % 7 + 1

:)

  • :) Nice! Readable as hell! – user4776684 Jun 22 '16 at 16:52
2

You can use ternary operator:

 date.wday == 0 ? 7 : date.wday
  • 1
    That I could figure out by myself, any better versions? I edited the question to be just Ruby, not Rails – Aurimas Jun 22 '16 at 16:39
  • Ruby does not treat 0 as nil/false. It is one of the things you have to get used to. A better way would be to add your custom method to the Date class. You can find an example here: stackoverflow.com/questions/12343555/… – user4776684 Jun 22 '16 at 16:43
  • 0 evaluating to true is just part of the language. It's intentional. See, for example: stackoverflow.com/a/10387572/6441528 . If you want an exception, you should do something like build a utility class that provides one. I personally wouldn't override Date, at least not if you're working collaboratively. It'll just confuse anyone who shares your code. – hightempo Jun 22 '16 at 16:51
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    @Aurimas: I don't know if you could figure out about ternary operator by yourself, considering that you could not figure out that 0 in Ruby is not nil/false, which should be the case for operator-|| usage. – user4776684 Jun 22 '16 at 17:09
  • 1
    While I would use cwday, I think this is a close second. I have no idea why it was downvoted, unless it was by the OP, who found it insulting. – Cary Swoveland Jun 22 '16 at 17:11
1

What you're describing here is less of a logical problem and more of a mapping one:

WEEKDAY_MAP = Hash.new { |h,k| h[k] = k < 7 ? k : nil }.merge(0 => 7)   

This one re-writes 1..6 to be the same, but 0 becomes 7. All other values are nil.

Then you can use this to re-write your day indicies:

b = WEEKDAY_MAP[a]

If at some point you want to tinker with the logic some more, that's also possible.

  • Nice, but doesn't it look a bit more complicated than day || 7 ? :D – Aurimas Jun 22 '16 at 18:05
  • @Aurimas; That is actually pretty good solution because after initialization (just once), you will not need to use any logical operations to determine your value. – user4776684 Jun 22 '16 at 18:17
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    @Aurimas Since Ruby is extremely strict about what's false in a logical sense, || 7 is never going to happen so you may as well abandon that idea: The When in Rome principle applies here. If you're doing a mapping operation, express it as such. In other languages you can take advantage of zero being a false value so the simplest expression of your desire does vary considerably depending on constraints. – tadman Jun 22 '16 at 18:21
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    In fact, this is the best answer here, hence it narrows down the fact this is a mapping issue. – Aleksei Matiushkin Jun 22 '16 at 18:36

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