3

Edit: I've realised that I'm working with the type long doubleand not just double which does make a difference. I've also added an example from my program below that reproduces the error in question.

Note: I'm currently working in C++11 and using GCC to compile.

I'm dealing with a situation where the result varies between the below two calculations:

value1 = x * 6.0;

double six = 6.0;
value2 = x * six;

value1 != value2

Where all variables above are of type long double.

Essentially, I wrote a line of code that gives me an incorrect answer when I use 6.0 in the actual calculation. Whereas, if I assign 6.0 to a variable of type long double first then use that variable in the calculation I receive the correct result.

I understand the basics of floating point arithmetic, and I guess it's obvious that something is happening to the bits of 6.0 when it is assigned to the long double type.

Sample from my actual program (I left the calculation as is to ensure the error is reproducible):

#include <iomanip>
#include <math.h>

long double six = 6.0;
long double value1;
long double value2;

value1 = (0.7854 * (pow(10, 5)) * six * (pow(0.033, 2)) * 1.01325 * (1.27 * 11.652375 / 1.01325 - 1.0));
value2 = (0.7854 * (pow(10, 5)) * 6.0 * (pow(0.033, 2)) * 1.01325 * (1.27 * 11.652375 / 1.01325 - 1.0));

std::cout << std::setprecision(25) << value1 << std::endl;
std::cout << std::setprecision(25) << value2 << std::endl;

Where the output is:

7074.327896870849993415931
7074.327896870850054256152

Also, I understand how floating point calculations only hold precision up to a certain number of bits (so setting such high precision shouldn't effect results, e.g. after 15-17 digits it should really matter if numbers vary but unfortunately this does affect my calculation).

Question: Why are the above two code segments producing (slightly) different results?

Note: I'm not simply comparing the two numbers with == and receiving false. I've just been printing them out using setprecision and checking each digit.

  • 4
    6.0 is already a double type. – chris Jun 22 '16 at 19:58
  • 2
    even with only doubles or only floats you should not rely on 3.0 + 3.0 == 6.0 – idclev 463035818 Jun 22 '16 at 19:59
  • 2
    @PaulWarnick I have retracted my duplicate vote because I figured out what you are actually asking. However I am unable to reproduce, can you provide a working example? – Galik Jun 22 '16 at 20:22
  • 2
    @PaulWarnick can you try making the literal a long double (i.e. 6.0L)? – Anon Mail Jun 22 '16 at 20:52
  • 2
    I was unable to locate a duplicate (I am sure there must be some) so I provided an answer. I think the main thing is to always provide a working example that reproduces the error. Then you can't go wrong:) – Galik Jun 22 '16 at 21:59
3

The problem here I believe is one of promotion.

long double six = 6.0;
long double value1;
long double value2;

value1 = (0.7854 * (pow(10, 5)) * six * (pow(0.033, 2)) * 1.01325 * (1.27 * 11.652375 / 1.01325 - 1.0));
value2 = (0.7854 * (pow(10, 5)) * 6.0 * (pow(0.033, 2)) * 1.01325 * (1.27 * 11.652375 / 1.01325 - 1.0));

Looking at the second calculation we notice that every term in the expression is type double. This means the whole expression will be evaluated to double precision.

However the first calculation contains the variable six that is of type long double. This will cause the entire expression to be calculated at the higher precision of a long double.

So this difference in the calculation's precision is likely the cause of the discrepancy. The whole of the first expression is promoted to long double precision but the second calculation is calculated only to double precision.

In fact a simple change to the code can prove this. If we change the type of the term 6.0 from double to long double by writing 6.0L we will get identical results because both expressions are now calculated to the same precision:

value1 = (0.7854 * (pow(10, 5)) * six * (pow(0.033, 2)) * 1.01325 * (1.27 * 11.652375 / 1.01325 - 1.0));
value2 = (0.7854 * (pow(10, 5)) * 6.0L * (pow(0.033, 2)) * 1.01325 * (1.27 * 11.652375 / 1.01325 - 1.0));
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