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I have a problem similar to the one discussed in "Recognizing distortions in a regular grid". I am attempting to map the distortions of a grid seen by a viewer wearing different kinds of eye protection. These distortions are usually caused by manufacturing irregularities and are more than simple fish-eye or pincushion distortions.

Additionally, I do not have a rectangular grid. My grid points are evenly spaced but only displayed within a circular region. Coding in MATLAB, using thresholding and region properties, I can identify each grid point in both the reference and distorted image. However, in the distorted image, I frequently have a different number of grid points due to the distortions. When the distortions are large and the distribution of the points change, it is very difficult to correlate the distorted point to its reference location.

I want to calculate the displacement of each point caused by the eye protection. My code works great for a rectangular grid where you don't lose any points but I am unable to calculate the displacement when I have a different number of points.

Is there any way to do this programmatically? I would really like to avoid designing an entirely new experimental set up. I have attached 2 images so you can see the kinds of images I am working with. Reference Grid, Distorted Grid. As you can see, the types of distortions I need to map are very different--including: contrast, occlusion, warping, and striation, among others. The examples of distortion in image 2 is pretty much the worst I could expect to see.

This is my first post on this site, so I didn't have the ability to comment or ask on any of the questions that were kind of related. Any help would be appreciated and let me know if my question needs any clarification.

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I have solved my problem. Instead of trying to limit my images to achieve the same number of grid points in each image, then sort the points, I designed an iterative pairing method that finds the nearest related point in the deformed grid to the reference grid, then removes that point from future pairings. I still have some issues, and I do lose points, but I just have to refine the pairing.

  • Your edit made my joke obsolete, so I have to be constructive. I'm afraid your question is already too broad as it is. What's worse, your distortions look horrible. I don't have any experience with image processing, but as a layman I'd be surprised if distortions this large and of this kind (both the blur and the striations look pretty bad) would allow you to trace back the distortions to the original coordinates. I hope I'm just being ignorant, for your sake:) Edit: I think most of my point is that the distortions seem to be so bad that light passing through is entirely scattered in places. – Andras Deak Jun 22 '16 at 22:04
  • I have solved my problem. Instead of trying to limit my images to achieve the same number of grid points in each image, then sort the points, I designed an iterative pairing method that finds the nearest related point in the deformed grid to the reference grid, then removes that point from future pairings. I still have some issues, and I do lose points, but I just have to refine the pairing. – K.G Jun 23 '16 at 19:50