18

I created a simple stopwatch (bash function) for counting time, but for now it's showing current time with milliseconds.

The code:

function stopwatch() {
    date +%H:%M:%S:%N
    while true; do echo -ne "`date +%H:%M:%S:%N`\r"; done;
}

I tried to change it as explained in this answer, but it works only with second since Unix Epoch.

When I used date format +%s.%N the subtraction from the answer above stopped working due to the fact that bash subtraction takes only integer.

How can I solve it and have a terminal stopwatch that prints time like so:

0.000000000
0.123123123
0.435345345
(and so on..)

?

7 Answers 7

23

One possible (& hacky) mechanism that can work for a day:

$ now=$(date +%s)sec
$ while true; do
     printf "%s\r" $(TZ=UTC date --date now-$now +%H:%M:%S.%N)
     sleep 0.1
  done

Bonus: You can press enter at any time to get the LAP times. ;-)

Note: This is a quick fix. Better solutions should be available...

watch based variant (same logic):

$ now=$(date +%s)sec; watch -n0.1 -p TZ=UTC date --date now-$now +%H:%M:%S.%N
8
  • Won't the nanoseconds always be off?
    – 123
    Jun 23, 2016 at 9:08
  • No. Nanoseconds are on and this is even better than my old solution (in another answer). Great! (although I also added some sleep due to CPU usage :-) )
    – lewiatan
    Jun 23, 2016 at 9:32
  • @lewiatan You may aswell use milli/microseconds if you are using sleep.
    – 123
    Jun 23, 2016 at 9:50
  • @123: I just translated OP's code & added date subtraction logic.
    – anishsane
    Jun 23, 2016 at 9:56
  • 1
    This will eat up quite some resources. Adding a sleep will improve this. I'm aware that OP mentioned milliseconds. Assuming that this is for human readability (and interaction) I think a small sleep like sleep 0.1s might be a good compromise.
    – exhuma
    Oct 4, 2018 at 10:06
18

If you want something simple that includes minutes, seconds, and centiseconds like a traditional stopwatch you could use sw.

sw

Install

wget -q -O - http://git.io/sinister | sh -s -- -u https://raw.githubusercontent.com/coryfklein/sw/master/sw

Usage

# start a stopwatch from 0, save start time in ~/.sw
sw

# resume the last run stopwatch
sw --resume 
5
  • To anyone looking at this after Jul, 2020. The app seems to be broken! Jul 28, 2020 at 4:58
  • 1
    I just installed it fresh on macOS Catalina 10.15.5 and it worked no problem. Feel free to file an issue on GitHub with your details @KarthikNayak.
    – Cory Klein
    Jul 29, 2020 at 15:33
  • There is a pending issue with the same issue here: github.com/coryfklein/sw/issues/2 Jul 30, 2020 at 7:11
  • 1
    Worked for me today.
    – Brett
    Feb 2, 2022 at 22:13
  • Since this technically doesn't answer the OP and a good number of us coming here are just looking for a functional terminal stopwatch, termdown has more features (if that's what one wants). Found via this Super User answer.
    – joeljpa
    Apr 27, 2023 at 9:43
12
time cat

then press Ctrl-c or Ctrl-d to stop the timer and show the time. The first number is the time.

I've further refined it into this bash alias

alias stopwatch="echo Press Ctrl-c to stop the timer; TIMEFORMAT=%R; time cat; unset TIMEFORMAT"
1
  • 1
    plus1. Another possibility is to use read -n1 instead of cat. Then Any character would terminate it.
    – anishsane
    May 13, 2020 at 4:24
4

Here's a nicer function I grabbed a while ago:

function stopwatch() {
    local BEGIN=$(date +%s)
    echo Starting Stopwatch...

    while true; do
        local NOW=$(date +%s)
        local DIFF=$(($NOW - $BEGIN))
        local MINS=$(($DIFF / 60))
        local SECS=$(($DIFF % 60))
        local HOURS=$(($DIFF / 3600))
        local DAYS=$(($DIFF / 86400))

        printf "\r%3d Days, %02d:%02d:%02d" $DAYS $HOURS $MINS $SECS
        sleep 0.5
    done
}

In response to a comment, here's a version that will exit once the user presses the Enter key:

function stopwatch_with_cancel() {
    local BEGIN=$(date +%s)
    echo Starting Stopwatch...

    while true; do
        local NOW=$(date +%s)
        local DIFF=$(($NOW - $BEGIN))
        local MINS=$(($DIFF / 60))
        local SECS=$(($DIFF % 60))
        local HOURS=$(($DIFF / 3600))
        local DAYS=$(($DIFF / 86400))

        printf "\r%3d Days, %02d:%02d:%02d" $DAYS $HOURS $MINS $SECS
        read -rsN1 -t1 key
        if [ "$key" == $'\x0a' ] ;then
            # echo -e "\n [Enter] Pressed"
            break
        fi
    done
}
2
  • doesn't your MINS need to mod 60? or else your MINS might show as 61 or 200. And then, the same with HOURS... need to mod 24 Jul 30, 2017 at 7:40
  • Can this be modified to be stopped when the user hits Enter?
    – leo
    Jan 14, 2023 at 3:14
2

Based on a gist by rawaludin:

function stopwatch() {
  local BEGIN=$(date +%s)

  while true; do
    local NOW=$(date +%s)
    local DIFF=$(($NOW - $BEGIN))
    local MINS=$(($DIFF / 60 % 60))
    local SECS=$(($DIFF % 60))
    local HOURS=$(($DIFF / 3600 % 24))
    local DAYS=$(($DIFF / 86400))
    local DAYS_UNIT
    [ "$DAYS" == 1 ] && DAYS_UNIT="Day" || DAYS_UNIT="Days"

    printf "\r  %d %s, %02d:%02d:%02d  " $DAYS $DAYS_UNIT $HOURS $MINS $SECS
    sleep 0.25
  done
}

For people who are not familiar with this: in English, only when it is 1 do we use singular -- Day. When it is 0, 2, 3, 4, 5..., we use plural "Days", so note that it is 0 Days.

1

Here is another take on a bash stopwatch, drawing much from other answers in this thread. Ways in which this version differs from the others include:

  • This version uses bash arithmetic rather than calling bc which I found (by timing it) to be way less cpu time.
  • I have addressed the 25th-hour limitation that someone had pointed out by tacking 24 hours onto the hour part for every day elapsed. (So now I guess it's the ~31st-day limitation.)
  • I leave the cursor just to the right of the output, unlike the version in the accepted answer. That way you can easily measure laps (or more generally mark important event times) just by hitting enter, which will move the timer to the next line, leaving the time at keypress visible.
#!/bin/bash

start_time=$(date +%s)

while true; do
  current_time=$(date +%s)
  seconds_elapsed=$(( $current_time - $start_time ))
  timestamp=$(date -d"@$seconds_elapsed" -u +%-d:%-H:%-M:%-S)

  IFS=':' read -r day hour minute second <<< "$timestamp"
  hour="$(( $hour+24*($day-1) ))"

  printf "\r%02d:%02d:%02d" $hour $minute $second
  sleep 0.5
done;

Here is sample output from running stopwatch (as an executable script in the PATH) and hitting the return key at 7 and 18 seconds, and hitting Ctrl-C after about 9 minutes:

$ stopwatch
00:00:07
00:00:18
00:09:03^C
$

Notes:

  • I use the +%-d:%-H:%-M:%-S output format for date (this dashes mean "leave off any leading zero please") because printf seems to interpret digit strings with a leading zero as octal and eventually complains about invalid values.
  • I got rid of the nanoseconds simply because for my purposes I don't need beyond 1-second precision. Therefore I adjusted the sleep duration to be longer to save on compute.
0

For the subtraction you should use bc (An arbitrary precision calculator language).

Here is the example code that fulfill your requirements:

function stopwatch() {
    date1=`date +%s.%N`
    while true; do
        curr_date=`date +%s.%N`
        subtr=`echo "$curr_date - $date1" | bc`
        echo -ne "$subtr\r";
        sleep 0.03
    done;
}

Additional sleep is added to lower the CPU usage (without it on my machine it was almost 15% and with this sleep it lowered to 1%).

2
  • 1
    You can certainly improve this slightly: you don't need the curr_date variable if you directly use: subtr=$(date "+%s.%N-$date1" | bc). You're saving one subshell on each iteration! You could also put bc out of the loop, and then use another loop to replace the \n output by bc by a \r. Jun 23, 2016 at 9:27
  • 1
    Something like: stopwatch() { local a date1=$(date +%s.%N); while :; do date "+%s.%N-$date1"; sleep 0.03; done | bc | while read a; do printf '%s\r' "$a"; done; }. With the printf you can use another format too, e.g., printf '%.3f\r' "$a". Jun 23, 2016 at 9:30

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