6

I read in the 'Professional JavaScript for Web Developers' by Nicholas Zakas in p.78 of 3rd edition (last one I think):

The switch statement compares values using the identically equal operator, so no type coercion occurs (for example the string "10" is not equal to the number 10).

I made up some simple switch statement just to confirm and the result was different:

var num = "9";

switch (true) {
    case num < 0:
        alert("less than 0");
        break;

    case num >= 0 && num <10:
        alert("between 0 and 10");
        break;

    default:
        alert("False");

} 

https://jsfiddle.net/pbxyvjyf/

So, type coercion is done: the alert("between 0 and 10") is chosen. Have the rules changed or am I doing something wrong?

6

This will return false:

var num = "9";

switch (num) {
  case num < 0:
    alert("less than 0");
    break;

  case num >= 0 && num <10:
    alert("between 0 and 10");
    break;

  default:
    alert("False");

}

Therefore, the author is correct.

  • 1
    Thank you:) Now I understand what I was doing wrong. In fact, even in the example I gave the author was correct: ´case num >= 0 && num <10:' (my example) num is a string, so converts to 0 because is false and then the 'alert("between 0 and 10");' appears. Thank you! – viery365 Jun 23 '16 at 15:44
  • 2
    The problem is that you're essentially comparing "9" with true and false. The expressions (num < 0, num >= 0 && num < 10) are evaluated before the case comparison is done. – Mike Cluck Jun 23 '16 at 15:55
  • @MikeC is exactly how you say! Now I understand. Thank you for make me understand what I done wrong. – viery365 Jun 23 '16 at 16:00
8

your case statements return a boolean so the type is correct

num >= 0 && num <10 - returns true or false

but if i would do this

switch (1) {
    case "1":
        console.log("never get here");
        break;

    case 1:
        console.log("but this works");
        break;

} 

  • Thank you very much! I was sure I was doing something wrong and I am glad you have corrected me. – viery365 Jun 23 '16 at 15:35
3

You really aren't using the switch statement as intended. There should be an expression that's evaluated in the switch and the cases check for possible values. This is from one of the canonical examples:

switch (new Date().getDay()) {
    case 0:
        day = "Sunday";
        break;
    case 1:
        day = "Monday";
        break;
    case 2:
        day = "Tuesday";
        break;
    case 3:
        day = "Wednesday";
        break;
    case 4:
        day = "Thursday";
        break;
    case 5:
        day = "Friday";
        break;
    case 6:
        day = "Saturday";
}

You are using the switch statement more like a bunch of ifs.

  • Thank you very much for your answer! – viery365 Jun 23 '16 at 15:49
3

What that line from the documentation means is that no type coercion is used in comparing the switch value to each of the case values.

If the case expression itself is an expression that would involve type coercion, then there will obviously be type coercion taking place. num >= 0 && num <10 evaluates to true, but the engine will use the "identically equal operator" in comparing that true against the true at the top of the switch statement. Since true is identically equal to true, the control flow goes into that case.

  • Thank you very much for your answer! Now I understand and I will not make the same mistake again:) – viery365 Jun 23 '16 at 15:47
1

Not an expert of javascript but I think that the rule that the author mentioned is valid in this case, for example:

   var num = "9";

    switch(num){

        case 9:
            alert("Yes the number is equal to: 9");
            break;
        default:
            alert("False");

    }

If you try to run this code you will see that the second alert will appear.

Hope that I helped you.. :)

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