2

I am looking fo a way to set the language on the fly when requesting a translation for a string in gettext. I'll explain why :

I have a multithreaded bot that respond to users by text on multiple servers, thus needing to reply in different languages. The documentation of gettext states that, to change locale while running, you should do the following :

import gettext # first, import gettext

lang1 = gettext.translation('myapplication', languages=['en']) # Load every translations
lang2 = gettext.translation('myapplication', languages=['fr'])
lang3 = gettext.translation('myapplication', languages=['de'])

# start by using language1
lang1.install()

# ... time goes by, user selects language 2
lang2.install()

# ... more time goes by, user selects language 3
lang3.install()

But, this does not apply in my case, as the bot is multithreaded :

Imagine the 2 following snippets are running at the same time :

import time
import gettext 
lang1 = gettext.translation('myapplication', languages=['fr'])
lang1.install()
message(_("Loading a dummy task")) # This should be in french, and it will
time.sleep(10)
message(_("Finished loading")) # This should be in french too, but it wont :'(

and

import time
import gettext 
lang = gettext.translation('myapplication', languages=['en'])
time.sleep(3) # Not requested on the same time
lang.install()
message(_("Loading a dummy task")) # This should be in english, and it will
time.sleep(10)
message(_("Finished loading")) # This should be in english too, and it will

You can see that messages sometimes are translated in the wrong locale. But, if I could do something like _("string", lang="FR"), the problem would disappear !

Have I missed something, or I'm using the wrong module to do the task... I'm using python3

  • Maybe I worded my question badly ? How can I improve it ? – WayToDoor Jun 23 '16 at 19:47
  • You did not provide enough information for someone to easily reproduce your problem. I had to figure out how to use gettext and create a minimal translation setup. Ideally, you would provide a minimal reproducible example. – David Cullen Jun 23 '16 at 20:23
  • Just don't use install obviously ... call gettext on the instances directly. (messing with builtins is nasty anyway). – o11c Jun 24 '16 at 2:22
2

The following example uses the translation directly, as shown in o11c's answer to allow the use of threads:

import gettext
import threading
import time

def translation_function(quit_flag, language):
    lang = gettext.translation('simple', localedir='locale', languages=[language])
    while not quit_flag.is_set():
        print(lang.gettext("Running translator"), ": %s" % language)
        time.sleep(1.0)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    thread_list = list()
    quit_flag = threading.Event()
    try:
        for lang in ['en', 'fr', 'de']:
            t = threading.Thread(target=translation_function, args=(quit_flag, lang,))
            t.daemon = True
            t.start()
            thread_list.append(t)
        while True:
            time.sleep(1.0)
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        quit_flag.set()
        for t in thread_list:
            t.join()

Output:

Running translator : en
Traducteur en cours d’exécution : fr
Laufenden Übersetzer : de
Running translator : en
Traducteur en cours d’exécution : fr
Laufenden Übersetzer : de

I would have posted this answer if I had known more about gettext. I am leaving my previous answer for folks who really want to continue using _().

| improve this answer | |
1

The following simple example shows how to use a separate process for each translator:

import gettext
import multiprocessing
import time

def translation_function(language):
    try:
        lang = gettext.translation('simple', localedir='locale', languages=[language])
        lang.install()
        while True:
            print(_("Running translator"), ": %s" % language)
            time.sleep(1.0)
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        pass

if __name__ == '__main__':
    thread_list = list()
    try:
        for lang in ['en', 'fr', 'de']:
            t = multiprocessing.Process(target=translation_function, args=(lang,))
            t.daemon = True
            t.start()
            thread_list.append(t)
        while True:
            time.sleep(1.0)
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        for t in thread_list:
            t.join()

The output looks like this:

Running translator : en
Traducteur en cours d’exécution : fr
Laufenden Übersetzer : de
Running translator : en
Traducteur en cours d’exécution : fr
Laufenden Übersetzer : de

When I tried this using threads, I only got an English translation. You could create individual threads in each process to handle connections. You probably do not want to create a new process for each connection.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, this has been useful : I now understand the gettext module better ! Have my upvote. I'll stay with @o11c solution, because it handle multithreading better ! – WayToDoor Jun 24 '16 at 9:45
1

I took a moment to whip up a script that uses all the locales available on the system, and tries to print a well-known message in them. Note that "all locales" includes mere encoding changes, which are negated by Python anyway, and plenty of translations are incomplete so do use the fallback.

Obviously, you will also have to make appropriate changes to your use of xgettext (or equivalent) for you real code to identify the translating function.

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import gettext
import os

def all_languages():
    rv = []
    for lang in os.listdir(gettext._default_localedir):
        base = lang.split('_')[0].split('.')[0].split('@')[0]
        if 2 <= len(base) <= 3 and all(c.islower() for c in base):
            if base != 'all':
                rv.append(lang)
    rv.sort()
    rv.append('C.UTF-8')
    rv.append('C')
    return rv

class Domain:
    def __init__(self, domain):
        self._domain = domain
        self._translations = {}

    def _get_translation(self, lang):
        try:
            return self._translations[lang]
        except KeyError:
            # The fact that `fallback=True` is not the default is a serious design flaw.
            rv = self._translations[lang] = gettext.translation(self._domain, languages=[lang], fallback=True)
            return rv

    def get(self, lang, msg):
        return self._get_translation(lang).gettext(msg)

def print_messages(domain, msg):
    domain = Domain(domain)
    for lang in all_languages():
        print(lang, ':', domain.get(lang, msg))

def main():
    print_messages('libc', 'No such file or directory')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks ! This has been useful. I used your domain class, and it works like a charm. With a few modifications, I've been able to set the language in the _ function ! – WayToDoor Jun 24 '16 at 9:43

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