2

Having the following singleton:

class Colors {
    static let sharedInstance = Colors()
    private init() {}
    let mainColor = UIColor.redColor()

}

I call it like this in some other class:

Colors.sharedInstance.mainColor

Is there a way to call it like this?:

Colors.mainColor

What if I have a struct inside:

class Colors {
    static let sharedInstance = Colors()
    private init() {}

    let mainColor = UIColor.redColor()

    struct gradients {
        let blueToRed = UIColor.blueColor()
    }

}

The only way I can call gradients is:

Color.gradients().blueColor

If I add a static property to initialize the struct I can get rid of the brackets, but when typing the autocomplete shows me both the static property and the struct:

class Colors {
    static let sharedInstance = Colors()
    static let gradientsProperty = gradients()
    private init() {}

    let mainColor = UIColor.redColor()

    struct gradients {
        let blueToRed = UIColor.blueColor()
    }

}

enter image description here

I want to type Colors.gradients.blueToRed

  • Well the point of the singleton pattern is that you a single (shared)instance. If you don't want to call it you can declare everything as static, but that's even worse than using singleton. – Philip Feldmann Jun 23 '16 at 18:27
  • And why is this a class, and not a struct? – Alexander Jun 23 '16 at 18:37
2

I came up with this answer. The reason for Singletons is the simplicity of use and performance, as there is no need to instantiate the class or struct every time.

Also the data to store here doesn't flow through the app, it's not going to be modified in app, it's just basic colors for reusability and maybe something else later like spacing constants for UI elements.

As commented above there is no need for classes in this case as I will not modify the data.

This answers allows the syntax I was looking for:

struct Style {
    private init() {}
    static let color = Color()
    static let gradient = Gradient()
}


struct Color {
    let mainColor = UIColor.redColor()
    let secundaryColor = UIColor.blueColor()
    let textColor = UIColor.darkGrayColor()
}

struct Gradient {
    let backgroundGradient = UIColor.brownColor()
    let overlayGradient = UIColor.yellowColor()
}

This is how you use it:

Style.color.mainColor
Style.gradient.backgroundGradient
  • Where and how do you create these Singletons? – Confused Oct 7 '16 at 19:48
1

In this case, there's no reason to use a singleton, when static fields would suffice:

class Colors {
    static let sharedInstance = Colors()
    static let gradientsProperty = gradients()
    private init() {}

    static let mainColor = UIColor.redColor()

    struct gradients {
        let blueToRed = UIColor.blueColor()
    }

}
  • This is certainly correct, I just want to add that this is considered a bad practice, way more than using singleton - which is pretty controversial already. Passing objects or using dependency injection is usually a better and more dynamic approach in general. – Philip Feldmann Jun 23 '16 at 18:30
  • @PhilipFeldmann For DI there would need to be another layer of abstraction, in the form of a protocol that Colors implements. OP didn't do that, so I figured static fields would suffice for the use case – Alexander Jun 23 '16 at 18:37
  • 1
    Don't get me wrong, your answer is completly correct, I just thought the OP should know that there are better practices to solve the problem. I didn't mean to criticize your answer, just to add some more information to increase the quality. But again you are right, the extra layer of abstraction will result in more work. – Philip Feldmann Jun 23 '16 at 18:41
0

You can use static properties to avoid to creating a singleton:

struct Colors {
    static let mainColor = UIColor.redColor()
    struct Gradients {
        static let blueToRed = UIColor.blueColor()
    }
}

By doing this you can call Colors.mainColor and Colors.Gradients.blueToRed.

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