57

I have something like:

SELECT *
FROM table
WHERE id IN (118, 17, 113, 23, 72);

It returns the rows ordered by ID, ascending. Is there a way to get back the rows in the order specified in the IN clause?

0

6 Answers 6

108

You should use "ORDER BY FIELD". So, for instance:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE id IN (118,17,113,23,72) 
ORDER BY FIELD(id,118,17,113,23,72)
5
  • @kentor: no problem, glad it helped
    – nico
    Sep 26, 2010 at 21:51
  • 1
    How is about the performance? Is it slow when re-specify the same id list? Aug 19, 2014 at 3:17
  • Unfortunately, it's pretty slow with a table with 500K records
    – Chris
    Apr 15 at 10:52
  • @Chris have you got a faster way of doing this? I'd be interested in learning about it
    – nico
    Apr 17 at 11:24
  • Basically, I'm managing the pagination and sorting by myself out of MySQL. For example: 1) you can use an array whose keys are the primary keys in the correct order 2) you loop the result from the query binding the values to the correct key.
    – Chris
    Apr 20 at 9:01
15

Try using FIND_IN_SET:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE id IN (118,17,113,23,72) 
    ORDER BY FIND_IN_SET(id, '118,17,113,23,72');
3
  • 3
    How do find_in_set compare to field?
    – ShiningRay
    Mar 2, 2012 at 4:37
  • 2
    @ShiningRay From manual seems that the FIELD is a straightforward method and FIND_IN_SET is more powerful and complex one that involves the string parsing and SET creation.
    – Igor
    Jan 11, 2014 at 14:07
  • 1
    Main answer not working for me. but this answer is working. Thanks Jan 20, 2018 at 9:15
2

You can create a temp table with two columns (ID, order_num):

ID   order_num
118  1
17   2
113  3
23   4
72   5

Then join:

SELECT * from table
INNER JOIN #temp_table 
ON table.id = #temp_table.id

Notice that you can drop the IN clause.

Sometimes I actually create a permanent table, because then when the client inevitably changes their mind about the ordering, I don't have to touch the code, just the table.

Edit

The answer using ORDER BY FIELD() (which I didn't know about) is probably what you want.

0
1

Set based approach: create a table-like structure that contains the id values and sort order, and join:

SELECT tbl.*
FROM (VALUES
    ROW(118, 1),
    ROW(17,  2),
    ROW(113, 3),
    ROW(23,  4),
    ROW(72,  5)
) AS tvc(id, sort)
JOIN tbl ON tvc.id = tbl.id
ORDER BY tvc.sort
0

You can create a number to sort on based on the id values:

select *
from table
where id in (118,17,113,23,72)
order by
  case id
    when 118 then 1
    when 17 then 2
    when 133 then 3
    when 23 then 4
    when 72 then 5
  end
0

this is the first thing that pops to mind. note sql is untested, you might need to check correct syntax

its a bit cumbersome, but might do the trick

select * from table where id = 118
union 
select * from table where id = 17
union 
.... and so on
1
  • 1
    No. Without an order by there is no guarantee of the order.
    – Salman A
    Feb 3 at 9:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.