50

I have a long string, which I build using ES6 template strings, but I want it to be without line breaks:

var string = `As all string substitutions in Template Strings are JavaScript
              expressions, we can substitute a lot more than variable names.
              For example, below we can use expression interpolation to 
              embed for some readable inline math:`

console.log(string);

Result:

As all string substitutions in Template Strings are JavaScript
expressions, we can substitute a lot more than variable names.
For example, below we can use expression interpolation to
embed for some readable inline math:

My expectations:

As all string substitutions in Template Strings are JavaScript expressions, we can substitute a lot more than variable names. For example, below we can use expression interpolation to embed for some readable inline math:
60

This is insane.

Almost every single answer here suggest running a function runtime in order to well-format, buildtime bad-formatted text oO Am I the only one shocked by that fact, especially performance impact ???

As stated by @dandavis, the official solution, (which btw is also the historic solution for unix shell scripts), is to escape the carriage return, well, with the escape character : \

`foo \
bar` === 'foo bar'

Simple, performant, official, readable, and shell-like in the process

  • 12
    What about the code indentation? – jcbp Jun 29 '18 at 17:57
  • 1
    This works, you're escaping the cariage return, not the further spaces – Cyril CHAPON Jul 4 '18 at 10:14
  • There are no "further spaces" nor "code indentation" needed. "The way to do this" is not doing this, and following code standards. The common way you see that in a code editor (i.e those automatically returning to the line) is not to re-indent like the previous line, it goes to the line and that's it (0 indentation). If you really want to indent it, go and try, HTML prints only one escape character anyway. If you really really don't want to have x espace characters, even if HTML auto-parses it, pre-process your code with a tool that does that, but please don't run it runtime for god sake – Cyril CHAPON Jul 18 '18 at 10:12
  • This should be the accepted answer! Thanks a lot – user3210641 Feb 11 at 18:20
31

A line break is a line break... If you produce them manually, I find very expectable that you get them during run-time.

BTW, I find three workarounds for now:

  1. Configure your IDE or code editor to do word wrap so you won't need to add line breaks in your code if you don't need them: your editor will break your code in two or more lines if each code sentence goes beyond configured maximum characters.

  2. Remove line breaks with String.prototype.replace:

var string = `As all string substitutions in Template Strings are JavaScript
expressions, we can substitute a lot more than variable names.
For example, below we can use expression interpolation to
embed for some readable inline math:`.replace(/\n/gm,"");

Caution: here you're running a function runtime to format your buildtime code, which might look like an anti-pattern, and have performance impact

  1. Perform these code line breaks using concatenations:
var string = `As all string substitutions in Template Strings are JavaScript`
              + `expressions, we can substitute a lot more than variable names.`
              + `For example, below we can use expression interpolation to` 
              + `embed for some readable inline math:`;

In my case, I would go with #1 option.

  • 1
    The second example does not work correctly. It has large gaps between lines. – jaybee Jun 24 '16 at 1:47
  • @dannyid what do you mean by large gaps? Does it contain more characters than the line break? – Matías Fidemraizer Jun 24 '16 at 8:20
  • 1
    @MatíasFidemraizer, copy/paste your #2 into console and then run string. You get the string but there are many spaces between Javascript and expressions, names. and For example, etc. – jaybee Jun 24 '16 at 15:41
  • You may not see it in a browser because browsers usually remove extra spaces but the actual underlying data is incorrect. – jaybee Jun 24 '16 at 15:42
  • @dannyid oh, I see, BTW this is a problem in the string itself, not the approach. Anyway I'll update my answer to solve the issue – Matías Fidemraizer Jun 24 '16 at 15:43
21
+50

If you have ES6, you can use tags. For instance, the stripIndent tag from the common-tags library:

Install via:

npm install common-tags --save

Require via:

const stripIndent = require('common-tags/lib/stripIndent')

Use as:

stripIndent`
  As all string substitutions in Template Strings are JavaScript
  expressions, we can substitute a lot more than variable names.
  For example, below we can use expression interpolation to
  embed for some readable inline math:        
`

Edit: As mentioned in the comments, you likely need to pick the: const oneLine = require('common-tags/lib/oneLine') tag for your desired outcome.

More info on the aforementioned common-tags link as well as on this blog

  • 4
    +1 for the library and mention of ES6 tags. In this case, however, I think OP would need the oneLine tag from the common-tags library. – lando Jan 5 '18 at 18:25
  • 2
    Running a runtime function for code formatting purpose... Downvote. Although the lib is pretty useful, and thanks for sharing it; for this special use case, he states that he "builds the string using es6 template", means buildtime.. Performance impact ? – Cyril CHAPON Mar 8 '18 at 8:10
13

I personally prefer the look of joining an array instead:

var string = [
  `As all string substitutions in Template Strings are JavaScript`,
  `expressions, we can substitute a lot more than variable names.`,
  `For example, below we can use expression interpolation to`,
  `embed for some readable inline math:`
].join(' ');
  • 1
    This method is also faster than concatenations using +, since this only creates one internal StringBuilder for the whole set instead of one for each concatenation (though this is a micro optimization) – Vinno97 Jan 15 '18 at 8:55
  • 2
    Running a runtime function for code formatting purpose... Downvote. Performance impact ? – Cyril CHAPON Mar 8 '18 at 8:10
  • @CyrilCHAPON is the performance really going to hinder the user experience to the point that the readability of this code warrants a downvote? – Yatrix Aug 31 '18 at 12:03
  • Imagine that for 10000 strings you have your answer – Cyril CHAPON Sep 4 '18 at 8:09
  • 2
    To spell this differently, this is more like a "concept-heresy", the practise in itself, that I'm pointing at. This is definaly conceptualy a bad practise, and one could simply learn to use right tools for the right thing. IDE configuration for "what they see as a developer", transpilers and pre-processors to make build-time purpose things, and leave runtime for the, well.. run-time stuff. – Cyril CHAPON Oct 11 '18 at 7:50
10
  • Either configure IDE to make wraps and use template string 1-liner, as in your 1st code snippet.

  • Either use \ escape literal char just before the line breaks.

    Example:

    const string = `1st line\
    2nd line\ 
    3rd line`; 
    

    But it will not save you from issues with space-aligning.

  • Either use old-school ES5 concatenation with '+'.

    Example:

    const string = '1st line' + 
                   '2nd line' + 
                   '3rd line'; 
    
  • Either use hack with template empty string var ${''}:

    Example:

    const string = `1st line${'' 
                   }2nd line${'' 
                   }3rd line`;
    

The 1st way is much more better, cause:

  • less symbols (size aspect)
  • no runtime operations (perfomance aspect)
  • 4
    This is the smartest answer here. Go accept this one – Cyril CHAPON Nov 26 '18 at 16:55
0

For paragraphs, you can use the \s+ regex to replace white space runs with a single space so it will work for line breaks as well as the indentations. So, in your case, just add .replace(/\s+/gm, ' ') at the end.

var string = `As all string substitutions in Template Strings are JavaScript
              expressions, we can substitute a lot more than variable names.
              For example, below we can use expression interpolation to 
              embed for some readable inline math:`.replace(/\s+/gm, ' ');

console.log(string);
0

In ES6, I prefer using a combination of the two top answers here (\ in combination with .replace()). The benefit of combining the replace function with the escape character means you can keep your codeblock consistently formatted with the rest of your code.

/\s{2}/g is a regular expression selecting any instance of two or more back-to-back spaces.

const myMessage = `Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Duis id urna \
    ligula. Suspendisse lobortis ex ut vestibulum venenatis. Donec imperdiet ante odio, \
    nec malesuada diam tristique eget. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing \
    elit. Cras in vulputate tellus.`
  .replace(/\s{2,}/g, "");

This outputs a plain, unbroken string.

"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Duis id urna ligula. Suspendisse lobortis ex ut vestibulum venenatis. Donec imperdiet ante odio, nec malesuada diam tristique eget. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur elit. Cras in vulputate tellus."

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