5

I need to get the results of the following function

  getScore <- function(history, similarities) {    
    nh<-ifelse(similarities<0, 6-history,history)
    x <- nh*abs(similarities) 
    contados <- !is.na(history)
    x2 <- sum(x, na.rm=TRUE)/sum(abs(similarities[contados]),na.rm=TRUE)
    x2
    }

For example for the following vectors:

notes <- c(1:5, NA)
history <- sample(notes, 1000000, replace=T)
similarities <- runif(1000000, -1,1)

That changes inside a loop. This takes:

ptm <- proc.time()
for (i in (1:10)) getScore(history, similarities)
proc.time() - ptm

   user  system elapsed 
   3.71    1.11    4.67 

Initially I suspect that the problem is the for loop, but profiling result points to ifelse().

Rprof("foo.out")
for (i in (1:10)) getScore(history, similarities)
Rprof(NULL)
summaryRprof("foo.out")

$by.self
           self.time self.pct total.time total.pct
"ifelse"        2.96    65.78       3.48     77.33
"-"             0.24     5.33       0.24      5.33
"getScore"      0.22     4.89       4.50    100.00
"<"             0.22     4.89       0.22      4.89
"*"             0.22     4.89       0.22      4.89
"abs"           0.22     4.89       0.22      4.89
"sum"           0.22     4.89       0.22      4.89
"is.na"         0.12     2.67       0.12      2.67
"!"             0.08     1.78       0.08      1.78

$by.total
           total.time total.pct self.time self.pct
"getScore"       4.50    100.00      0.22     4.89
"ifelse"         3.48     77.33      2.96    65.78
"-"              0.24      5.33      0.24     5.33
"<"              0.22      4.89      0.22     4.89
"*"              0.22      4.89      0.22     4.89
"abs"            0.22      4.89      0.22     4.89
"sum"            0.22      4.89      0.22     4.89
"is.na"          0.12      2.67      0.12     2.67
"!"              0.08      1.78      0.08     1.78

$sample.interval
[1] 0.02

$sampling.time
[1] 4.5

ifelse() is my performance bottleneck. Unless there is a way in R to speed up ifelse(), there is unlikely to be great performance boost.

However, ifelse() is already the vectorized approach. It seems to me that the only chance left is to use C/C++. But is there a way to avoid using compiled code?

  • 1
    If you're just looking to optimize code that already works then this is a CodeReview question not a StackOverflow question. codereview.stackexchange.com – Hack-R Jun 24 '16 at 3:05
5

I have encountered this before. We don't have to use ifelse() all the time. If you have a look at how ifelse is written, by typing "ifelse" in your R console, you can see that this function is written in R language, and it does various checking which is really inefficient.

Instead of using ifelse(), we can do this:

getScore <- function(history, similarities) {
  ######## old code #######
  # nh <- ifelse(similarities < 0, 6 - history, history)
  ######## old code #######
  ######## new code #######
  nh <- history
  ind <- similarities < 0
  nh[ind] <- 6 - nh[ind]
  ######## new code #######
  x <- nh * abs(similarities) 
  contados <- !is.na(history)
  sum(x, na.rm=TRUE) / sum(abs(similarities[contados]), na.rm = TRUE)
  }

And then let's check profiling result again:

Rprof("foo.out")
for (i in (1:10)) getScore(history, similarities)
Rprof(NULL)
summaryRprof("foo.out")

# $by.total
#            total.time total.pct self.time self.pct
# "getScore"       2.10    100.00      0.88    41.90
# "abs"            0.32     15.24      0.32    15.24
# "*"              0.26     12.38      0.26    12.38
# "sum"            0.26     12.38      0.26    12.38
# "<"              0.14      6.67      0.14     6.67
# "-"              0.14      6.67      0.14     6.67
# "!"              0.06      2.86      0.06     2.86
# "is.na"          0.04      1.90      0.04     1.90

# $sample.interval
# [1] 0.02

# $sampling.time
# [1] 2.1

We have a 2+ times boost in performance. Furthermore, the profile is more like a flat profile, without any single part dominating execution time.

In R, vector indexing / reading / writing is at speed of C code, so whenever we can, use a vector.


Testing @Matthew's answer

mat_getScore <- function(history, similarities) {
  ######## old code #######
  # nh <- ifelse(similarities < 0, 6 - history, history)
  ######## old code #######
  ######## new code #######
  ind <- similarities < 0
  nh <- ind*(6-history) + (!ind)*history
  ######## new code #######
  x <- nh * abs(similarities) 
  contados <- !is.na(history)
  sum(x, na.rm=TRUE) / sum(abs(similarities[contados]), na.rm = TRUE)
  }

Rprof("foo.out")
for (i in (1:10)) mat_getScore(history, similarities)
Rprof(NULL)
summaryRprof("foo.out")

# $by.total
#                total.time total.pct self.time self.pct
# "mat_getScore"       2.60    100.00      0.24     9.23
# "*"                  0.76     29.23      0.76    29.23
# "!"                  0.40     15.38      0.40    15.38
# "-"                  0.34     13.08      0.34    13.08
# "+"                  0.26     10.00      0.26    10.00
# "abs"                0.20      7.69      0.20     7.69
# "sum"                0.18      6.92      0.18     6.92
# "<"                  0.16      6.15      0.16     6.15
# "is.na"              0.06      2.31      0.06     2.31

# $sample.interval
# [1] 0.02

# $sampling.time
# [1] 2.6

Ah? Slower?

The full profiling result shows that this approach spends more time on floating point multiplication "*", and the logical not "!" seems pretty expensive. While my approach requires floating point addition / subtraction only.

Well, The result might be also architecture dependent. I am testing on Intel Nahalem (Intel Core 2 Duo) at the moment. So benchmarking between two approaches on various platforms are welcomed.


Remark

All profiling are using OP's data in the question.

  • 1
    Core 2 duo is pre-Nehalem architecture, and that may be part of the difference. I'm testing on a Sandy Bridge i7-3740QM. – Matthew Lundberg Jun 24 '16 at 4:47
  • I have a Core 2 machine here, let me compare microbenchmark on it – Matthew Lundberg Jun 24 '16 at 4:58
  • 1
    On Nehalem and beyond, while multiplication has a higher instruction latency than addition, that often does not matter. Instructions are run out of order, and the number of retired instructions is what matters. Without data dependencies, both instructions are going to be "retired" in one clock tick. Same as you, I am not using a special BLAS. I'll be happy to do a Rprof run on this tomorrow, but it's nearly time for me to retire for the night. – Matthew Lundberg Jun 24 '16 at 5:07
  • That is correct, out-of-order execution and instruction-level parallelism. Indeed, on my Core 2, I get the same results as you -- my code is slower. I will enter results into my answer shortly. – Matthew Lundberg Jun 24 '16 at 5:11
7

You can use logical multiplication for this task to achieve the same effect:

s <- similarities < 0
nh <- s*(6-history) + (!s)*history

Benchmark on i7-3740QM:

f1 <- function(history, similarities) { s <- similarities < 0
                                        s*(6-history) + (!s)*history}
f2 <- function(history, similarities) ifelse(similarities<0, 6-history,history)
f3 <- function(history, similarities) {  nh <- history
                                         ind <- similarities<0
                                         nh[ind] <- 6 - nh[ind]
                                         nh }

microbenchmark(f1(history, similarities), 
               f2(history, similarities), 
               f3(history, similarities))
## Unit: milliseconds
##                       expr        min          lq         mean             median         uq        max neval cld
##  f1(history, similarities)  22.830260  24.6167695  28.31384860  24.89869950000000  25.651655  81.043713   100 a  
##  f2(history, similarities) 364.514460 412.7117810 408.37156626 415.10114899999996 417.345748 437.977256   100   c
##  f3(history, similarities)  84.220279  86.2894795  92.64614571  87.18016549999999  89.616522 149.243051   100  b 

On E5-2680 v2:

## Unit: milliseconds
##                       expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq       max neval cld
##  f1(history, similarities)  20.03963  20.10954  21.41055  20.68597  21.25920  50.95278   100 a  
##  f2(history, similarities) 314.54913 315.96621 324.91486 319.50290 325.93168 378.26016   100   c
##  f3(history, similarities)  73.81413  73.92162  76.10418  74.79893  75.84634 105.98770   100  b 

On T5600 (Core2 Duo Mobile):

## Unit: milliseconds
                      expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
##  f1(history, similarities) 147.2953 152.9307 171.0870 155.5632 167.0998 344.7524   100  b 
##  f2(history, similarities) 408.5728 493.3886 517.0573 501.6993 525.8573 797.9624   100   c
##  f3(history, similarities) 102.9621 110.6003 131.1826 112.9961 125.3906 303.1170   100 a  

Aha! My approach is slower on the Core 2 architecture.

0

Here is a faster ifelse, though it isn't faster than the above answers, it maintains the ifelse structure.

ifelse_sign <- function(b,x,y){

    x[!b] <- 0
    y[b] <-0

    x + y + b *0
}

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