When should I store the Subscription instances and invoke unsubscribe() during the NgOnDestroy life cycle and when can I simply ignore them?

Saving all subscriptions introduces a lot of mess into component code.

HTTP Client Guide ignore subscriptions like this:

getHeroes() {
  this.heroService.getHeroes()
                   .subscribe(
                     heroes => this.heroes = heroes,
                     error =>  this.errorMessage = <any>error);
}

In the same time Route & Navigation Guide says that:

Eventually, we'll navigate somewhere else. The router will remove this component from the DOM and destroy it. We need to clean up after ourselves before that happens. Specifically, we must unsubscribe before Angular destroys the component. Failure to do so could create a memory leak.

We unsubscribe from our Observable in the ngOnDestroy method.

private sub: any;

ngOnInit() {
  this.sub = this.route.params.subscribe(params => {
     let id = +params['id']; // (+) converts string 'id' to a number
     this.service.getHero(id).then(hero => this.hero = hero);
   });
}

ngOnDestroy() {
  this.sub.unsubscribe();
}
  • 12
    I guess Subscriptions to http-requests can be ignored, as they only call onNext once and then they call onComplete. The Router instead calls onNext repeatedly and might never call onComplete (not sure about that...). Same goes for Observables from Events. So I guess those should be unsubscribed. – Springrbua Jun 24 '16 at 8:41
  • 1
    I'm having the same qeustions. My guess (someone please confirm): Looking at the 2 examples and reading the answer below.. In first example, no subscription is actually created within the component so nothing hangs around once it's complete and function goes out of scope. While in the 2nd example, a 'private sub: any' is created in the component and it wouldn't "complete" on its own so it needs to be unsubscribed?? – gt6707a Nov 11 '16 at 17:41
  • @gt6707a The stream completes (or does not complete) independent of any observation of that completion. The callbacks (the observer) provided to the subscription function do not determine if resources are allocated. It is the call to subscribe itself that potentially allocates resources upstream. – seangwright Dec 16 '16 at 3:31

14 Answers 14

up vote 666 down vote accepted

--- Edit 3 - The 'Official' Solution (2017/04/09)

I spoke with Ward Bell about this question at NGConf (I even showed him this answer which he said was correct) but he told me the docs team for Angular had a solution to this question that is unpublished (though they are working on getting it approved). He also told me I could update my SO answer with the forthcoming official recommendation.

The solution we should all use going forward is to add a private ngUnsubscribe: Subject = new Subject(); field to all components that have .subscribe() calls to Observables within their class code.

We then call this.ngUnsubscribe.next(); this.ngUnsubscribe.complete(); in our ngOnDestroy() methods.

The secret sauce (as noted already by @metamaker) is to call .takeUntil(this.ngUnsubscribe) before each of our .subscribe() calls which will guarantee all subscriptions will be cleaned up when the component is destroyed.

Example:

import { Component, OnDestroy, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import 'rxjs/add/operator/takeUntil';
// import { takeUntil } from 'rxjs/operators'; // for rxjs ^5.5.0 lettable operators
import { Subject } from 'rxjs/Subject';
import { MyThingService } from '../my-thing.service';

@Component({
    selector: 'my-thing',
    templateUrl: './my-thing.component.html'
})
export class MyThingComponent implements OnDestroy, OnInit {
    private ngUnsubscribe: Subject = new Subject();

    constructor(
        private myThingService: MyThingService,
    ) { }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.myThingService.getThings()
            .takeUntil(this.ngUnsubscribe)
            .subscribe(things => console.log(things));

        /* if using lettable operators in rxjs ^5.5.0
        this.myThingService.getThings()
            .pipe(takeUntil(this.ngUnsubscribe))
            .subscribe(things => console.log(things)); */

        this.myThingService.getOtherThings()
            .takeUntil(this.ngUnsubscribe)
            .subscribe(things => console.log(things));
    }

    ngOnDestroy() {
        this.ngUnsubscribe.next();
        this.ngUnsubscribe.complete();
    }
}

Note: It's important to add the takeUntil operator as the last one to prevent leaks with intermediate observables in the operator chain.

--- Edit 2 (2016/12/28)

Source 5

The Angular tutorial, the Routing chapter now states the following: "The Router manages the observables it provides and localizes the subscriptions. The subscriptions are cleaned up when the component is destroyed, protecting against memory leaks, so we don't need to unsubscribe from the route params Observable." - Mark Rajcok

Here's a discussion on the Github issues for the Angular docs regarding Router Observables where Ward Bell mentions that clarification for all of this is in the works.

--- Edit 1

Source 4

In this video from NgEurope Rob Wormald also says you do not need to unsubscribe from Router Observables. He also mentions the http service and ActivatedRoute.params in this video from November 2016.

--- Original Answer

TLDR:

For this question there are (2) kinds of Observables - finite value and infinite value.

http Observables produce finite (1) values and something like a DOM event listener Observables produce infinite values.

If you manually call subscribe (not using async pipe), then unsubscribe from infinite Observables.

Don't worry about finite ones, RxJs will take care of them.

Source 1

I tracked down an answer from Rob Wormald in Angular's Gitter here.

He states (i reorganized for clarity and emphasis is mine)

if its a single-value-sequence (like an http request) the manual cleanup is unnecessary (assuming you subscribe in the controller manually)

i should say "if its a sequence that completes" (of which single value sequences, a la http, are one)

if its an infinite sequence, you should unsubscribe which the async pipe does for you

Also he mentions in this youtube video on Observables that they clean up after themselves... in the context of Observables that complete (like Promises, which always complete because they are always producing 1 value and ending - we never worried about unsubscribing from Promises to make sure they clean up xhr event listeners, right?).

Source 2

Also in the Rangle guide to Angular 2 it reads

In most cases we will not need to explicitly call the unsubscribe method unless we want to cancel early or our Observable has a longer lifespan than our subscription. The default behavior of Observable operators is to dispose of the subscription as soon as .complete() or .error() messages are published. Keep in mind that RxJS was designed to be used in a "fire and forget" fashion most of the time.

When does the phrase our Observable has a longer lifespan than our subscription apply?

It applies when a subscription is created inside a component which is destroyed before (or not 'long' before) the Observable completes.

I read this as meaning if we subscribe to an http request or an observable that emits 10 values and our component is destroyed before that http request returns or the 10 values have been emitted, we are still ok!

When the request does return or the 10th value is finally emitted the Observable will complete and all resources will be cleaned up.

Source 3

If we look at this example from the same Rangle guide we can see that the Subscription to route.params does require an unsubscribe() because we don't know when those params will stop changing (emitting new values).

The component could be destroyed by navigating away in which case the route params will likely still be changing (they could technically change until the app ends) and the resources allocated in subscription would still be allocated because there hasn't been a completion.

  • 8
    Calling complete() by itself doesn't appear to clean up the subscriptions. However calling next() and then complete() does, I believe takeUntil() only stops when a value is produced, not when the sequence is ended. – Firefly Apr 11 '17 at 8:53
  • 2
    @seangwright A quick test with a member of type Subject inside a component and toggling it with ngIf to trigger ngOnInit and ngOnDestroy shows, that the subject and its subscriptions will never complete or get disposed (hooked up a finally-operator to the subscription). I must call Subject.complete() in ngOnDestroy, so the subscriptions can clean up after themselves. – Lars Apr 11 '17 at 9:17
  • 2
    Your --- Edit 3 is very insightful, thanks! I just have a followup question: if using the takeUnitl approach, we never have to manually unsubscribe from any observables? Is that the case? Furthermore, why do we need to call next() in the ngOnDestroy, why not just call complete()? – uglycode Apr 22 '17 at 10:21
  • 5
    @seangwright That's disappointing; the additional boilerplate is annoying. – spongessuck Apr 27 '17 at 20:30
  • 3
    Edit 3 discussed in context of events at medium.com/@benlesh/rxjs-dont-unsubscribe-6753ed4fda87 – HankCa May 29 '17 at 2:07

You don't need to have bunch of subscriptions and unsubscribe manually. Use RxJS.Subject and takeUntil combo to handle subscriptions like a boss:

import {Subject} from "rxjs/Subject";

@Component(
    {
        moduleId: __moduleName,
        selector: 'my-view',
        templateUrl: '../views/view-route.view.html',
    }
)
export class ViewRouteComponent implements OnDestroy
{
    componentDestroyed$: Subject<boolean> = new Subject();

    constructor(protected titleService: TitleService)
    {
        this.titleService.emitter1$
            .takeUntil(this.componentDestroyed$)
            .subscribe(
            (data: any) =>
            {
                // ... do something 1
            }
        );

        this.titleService.emitter2$
            .takeUntil(this.componentDestroyed$)
            .subscribe(
            (data: any) =>
            {
                // ... do something 2
            }
        );

        // ...

        this.titleService.emitterN$
            .takeUntil(this.componentDestroyed$)
            .subscribe(
            (data: any) =>
            {
                // ... do something N
            }
        );
    }

    ngOnDestroy()
    {
        this.componentDestroyed$.next(true);
        this.componentDestroyed$.complete();
    }
}

Alternative approach, which was proposed by @acumartini in comments, uses takeWhile instead of takeUntil. You may prefer it, but mind that this way your Observable execution will not be cancelled on ngDestroy of your component (e.g. when you make time consuming calculations or wait for data from server). Method, which is based on takeUntil, doesn't have this drawback and leads to immediate cancellation of request. Thanks to @AlexChe for detailed explanation in comments.

So here is the code:

@Component(
    {
        moduleId: __moduleName,
        selector: 'my-view',
        templateUrl: '../views/view-route.view.html',
    }
)
export class ViewRouteComponent implements OnDestroy
{
    alive: boolean = true;

    constructor(protected titleService: TitleService)
    {
        this.titleService.emitter1$
            .takeWhile(() => this.alive)
            .subscribe(
            (data: any) =>
            {
                // ... do something 1
            }
        );

        this.titleService.emitter2$
            .takeWhile(() => this.alive)
            .subscribe(
            (data: any) =>
            {
                // ... do something 2
            }
        );

        // ...

        this.titleService.emitterN$
            .takeWhile(() => this.alive)
            .subscribe(
            (data: any) =>
            {
                // ... do something N
            }
        );
    }

    // Probably, this.alive = false MAY not be required here, because
    // if this.alive === undefined, takeWhile will stop. I
    // will check it as soon, as I have time.
    ngOnDestroy()
    {
        this.alive = false;
    }
}
  • Why do you use a subject just to keep a bool , while you can use a bool.? – Royi Namir Apr 22 '17 at 21:00
  • 1
    If he just use a bool to keep the state, how to make "takeUntil" works as expected? – Val Apr 24 '17 at 3:38
  • @Val, you are absolutely correct. @Royi, check takeUntil documentation to see explanation how it works xgrommx.github.io/rx-book/content/observable/…. As parameter it accepts only Observable | Promise. – metamaker Apr 24 '17 at 8:19
  • 3
    I think there is a significant difference between using takeUntil and takeWhile. The former unsubscribes from the source observable immediately when fired, while the latter unsubscribes only as soon as next value is produced by the source observable. If producing a value by the source observable is a resource consuming operation, choosing between the two may go beyond style preference. See the plunk – Alex Che Aug 22 '17 at 16:40
  • 1
    OTOH, if we use takeWhile, in the ngOnDestory we just set the boolean variable. But the mining Observable function might still work for up to one day, and only then during it's next call will it realize that there are no subscriptions active and it needs to cancel. – Alex Che Aug 31 '17 at 14:23

The Subscription class has an interesting feature:

Represents a disposable resource, such as the execution of an Observable. A Subscription has one important method, unsubscribe, that takes no argument and just disposes the resource held by the subscription.
Additionally, subscriptions may be grouped together through the add() method, which will attach a child Subscription to the current Subscription. When a Subscription is unsubscribed, all its children (and its grandchildren) will be unsubscribed as well.

You can create an aggregate Subscription object that groups all your subscriptions. You do this by creating an empty Subscription and adding subscriptions to it using its add() method. When your component is destroyed, you only need to unsubscribe the aggregate subscription.

@Component({ ... })
export class SmartComponent implements OnInit, OnDestroy {
  private subscriptions = new Subscription();

  constructor(private heroService: HeroService) {
  }

  ngOnInit() {
    this.subscriptions.add(this.heroService.getHeroes().subscribe(heroes => this.heroes = heroes));
    this.subscriptions.add(/* another subscription */);
    this.subscriptions.add(/* and another subscription */);
    this.subscriptions.add(/* and so on */);
  }

  ngOnDestroy() {
    this.subscriptions.unsubscribe();
  }
}
  • I'm using this approach. Wondering if this is better than using the approach with takeUntil(), like in the accepted answer.. drawbacks ? – Manuel Di Iorio Sep 19 '17 at 20:28
  • No drawbacks that I'm aware of. I don't think this is better, just different. – Steven Liekens Sep 19 '17 at 20:56
  • 1
    This looks so much cleaner. – Ben Oct 25 '17 at 13:00
  • See medium.com/@benlesh/rxjs-dont-unsubscribe-6753ed4fda87 for further discussion on the official takeUntil approach versus this approach of collecting subscriptions and calling unsubscribe. (This approach seems a lot cleaner to me.) – Josh Kelley Mar 29 at 20:31

It depends. If by calling someObservable.subscribe(), you start holding up some resource that must be manually freed-up when the lifecycle of your component is over, then you should call theSubscription.unsubscribe() to prevent memory leak.

Let's take a closer look at your examples:

getHero() returns the result of http.get(). If you look into the angular 2 source code, http.get() creates two event listeners:

_xhr.addEventListener('load', onLoad);
_xhr.addEventListener('error', onError);

and by calling unsubscribe(), you can cancel the request as well as the listeners:

_xhr.removeEventListener('load', onLoad);
_xhr.removeEventListener('error', onError);
_xhr.abort();

Note that _xhr is platform specific but I think it's safe to assume that it is an XMLHttpRequest() in your case.

Normally, this is enough evidence to warrant a manual unsubscribe() call. But according this WHATWG spec, the XMLHttpRequest() is subject to garbage collection once it is "done", even if there are event listeners attached to it. So I guess that's why angular 2 official guide omits unsubscribe() and lets GC clean up the listeners.

As for your second example, it depends on the implementation of params. As of today, the angular official guide no longer shows unsubscribing from params. I looked into src again and found that params is a just a BehaviorSubject. Since no event listeners or timers were used, and no global variables were created, it should be safe to omit unsubscribe().

The bottom line to your question is that always call unsubscribe() as a guard against memory leak, unless you are certain that the execution of the observable doesn't create global variables, add event listeners, set timers, or do anything else that results in memory leaks.

When in doubt, look into the implementation of that observable. If the observable has written some clean up logic into its unsubscribe(), which is usually the function that is returned by the constructor, then you have good reason to seriously consider calling unsubscribe().

Some of the best practices regarding observables unsubscriptions inside Angular components:

A quote from Routing & Navigation

When subscribing to an observable in a component, you almost always arrange to unsubscribe when the component is destroyed.

There are a few exceptional observables where this is not necessary. The ActivatedRoute observables are among the exceptions.

The ActivatedRoute and its observables are insulated from the Router itself. The Router destroys a routed component when it is no longer needed and the injected ActivatedRoute dies with it.

Feel free to unsubscribe anyway. It is harmless and never a bad practice.

And in responding to the following links:

I collected some of the best practices regarding observables unsubscriptions inside Angular components to share with you:

  • http observable unsubscription is conditional and we should consider the effects of the 'subscribe callback' being run after the component is destroyed on a case by case basis. We know that angular unsubscribes and cleans the http observable itself. While this is true from the perspective of resources it only tells half the story. Let's say we're talking about directly calling http from within a component, and the http response took longer than needed so the user closed the component. The subscribe() handler will still be called even if the component is closed and destroyed. This can have unwanted side effects and in the worse scenarios leave the application state broken. It can also cause exceptions if the code in the callback tries to call something that has just been disposed of. However at the same time occasionally they are desired. Like, let's say you're creating an email client and you trigger a sound when the email is done sending - well you'd still want that to occur even if the component is closed (8).
  • No need to unsubscribe from observables that complete or error. However, there is no harm in doing so(7).
  • Use AsyncPipe as much as possible because it automatically unsubscribes from the observable on component destruction.
  • Unsubscribe from the ActivatedRoute observables like route.params if they are subscribed inside a nested (Added inside tpl with the component selector) or dynamic component as they may be subscribed many times as long as the parent/host component exists. No need to unsubscribe from them in other scenarios as mentioned in the quote above from Routing & Navigation docs.
  • Unsubscribe from global observables shared between components that are exposed through an Angular service for example as they may be subscribed multiple times as long as the component is initialized.
  • No need to unsubscribe from service internal observables since an Angular service never get's destroyed, unless your entire application get's destroyed, there is no real reason to unsubscribe from it and there is no chance of memory leaks. (6)
  • Use an abstract technique to avoid any code mess that may be resulted from unsubscriptions. You can manage your subscriptions with takeUntil (3) or you can use this npm package mentioned at (4) The easiest way to unsubscribe from Observables in Angular.
  • Always unsubscribe from FormGroup observables like form.valueChanges and form.statusChanges
  • Always unsubscribe from observables of Renderer2 service like renderer2.listen
  • Unsubscribe from every observable else as a memory-leak guard step until Angular Docs explicitly tells us which observables are unnecessary to be unsubscribed (Check issue: (5) Documentation for RxJS Unsubscribing (Open)).
  • Bonus: Always use the Angular ways to bind events like HostListener as angular cares well about removing the event listeners if needed and prevents any potential memory leak due to event bindings.

A nice final tip: If you don't know if an observable is being automatically unsubscribed/completed or not, add a complete callback to subscribe(...) and check if it gets called when the component is destroyed.

Angular 2 official documentation provides an explanation for when to unsubscribe and when it can be safely ignored. Have a look at this link:

https://angular.io/docs/ts/latest/cookbook/component-communication.html#!#bidirectional-service

Look for the paragraph with the heading Parent and children communicate via a service and then the blue box:

Notice that we capture the subscription and unsubscribe when the AstronautComponent is destroyed. This is a memory-leak guard step. There is no actual risk in this app because the lifetime of a AstronautComponent is the same as the lifetime of the app itself. That would not always be true in a more complex application.

We do not add this guard to the MissionControlComponent because, as the parent, it controls the lifetime of the MissionService.

I hope this helps you.

  • 3
    as a component you never know whether you're a child or not. therefore you should always unsubscribe from subscriptions as best practice. – SeriousM Oct 29 '16 at 17:57
  • 1
    The point about MissionControlComponent is not really about whether it's a parent or not, it's that the component itself provides the service. When MissionControl gets destroyed, so does the service and any references to the instance of the service, thus there is no possibility of a leak. – ender Nov 10 '16 at 20:44

Since seangwright's solution (Edit 3) appears to be very useful, I also found it a pain to pack this feature into base component, and hint other project teammates to remember to call super() on ngOnDestroy to activate this feature.

This answer provide a way to set free from super call, and make "componentDestroyed$" a core of base component.

class BaseClass {
    protected componentDestroyed$: Subject<void> = new Subject<void>();
    constructor() {

        /// wrap the ngOnDestroy to be an Observable. and set free from calling super() on ngOnDestroy.
        let _$ = this.ngOnDestroy;
        this.ngOnDestroy = () => {
            this.componentDestroyed$.next();
            this.componentDestroyed$.complete();
            _$();
        }
    }

    /// placeholder of ngOnDestroy. no need to do super() call of extended class.
    ngOnDestroy() {}
}

And then you can use this feature freely for example:

@Component({
    selector: 'my-thing',
    templateUrl: './my-thing.component.html'
})
export class MyThingComponent extends BaseClass implements OnInit, OnDestroy {
    constructor(
        private myThingService: MyThingService,
    ) { super(); }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.myThingService.getThings()
            .takeUntil(this.componentDestroyed$)
            .subscribe(things => console.log(things));
    }

    /// optional. not a requirement to implement OnDestroy
    ngOnDestroy() {
        console.log('everything works as intended with or without super call');
    }

}

Based on : Using Class inheritance to hook to Angular 2 component lifecycle

Another generic approach:

export abstract class UnsubscribeOnDestroy implements OnDestroy {
  protected d$: Subject<any>;

  constructor() {
    this.d$ = new Subject<void>();

    const f = this.ngOnDestroy;
    this.ngOnDestroy = () => {
      f();
      this.d$.next();
      this.d$.complete();
    };
  }

  public ngOnDestroy() {
    // no-op
  }

}

And use :

@Component({
    selector: 'my-comp',
    template: ``
})
export class RsvpFormSaveComponent extends UnsubscribeOnDestroy implements OnInit {

    constructor() {
        super();
    }

    ngOnInit(): void {
      Observable.of('bla')
      .takeUntil(this.d$)
      .subscribe(val => console.log(val));
    }
}

  • This does NOT work correctly. Please be careful when using this solution. You are missing a this.componentDestroyed$.next() call like the accepted solution by sean above... – philn Feb 23 at 12:00
  • True ! Sorry, I fixed this issue since long time but forgot to update this post. Thx for your remark. – JoG Feb 23 at 14:55

The official Edit #3 answer (and variations) works well, but the thing that gets me is the 'muddying' of the business logic around the observable subscription.

Here's another approach using wrappers.

Warining: experimental code

File subscribeAndGuard.ts is used to create a new Observable extension to wrap .subscribe() and within it to wrap ngOnDestroy().
Usage is the same as .subscribe(), except for an additional first parameter referencing the component.

import { Observable } from 'rxjs/Observable';
import { Subscription } from 'rxjs/Subscription';

const subscribeAndGuard = function(component, fnData, fnError = null, fnComplete = null) {

  // Define the subscription
  const sub: Subscription = this.subscribe(fnData, fnError, fnComplete);

  // Wrap component's onDestroy
  if (!component.ngOnDestroy) {
    throw new Error('To use subscribeAndGuard, the component must implement ngOnDestroy');
  }
  const saved_OnDestroy = component.ngOnDestroy;
  component.ngOnDestroy = () => {
    console.log('subscribeAndGuard.onDestroy');
    sub.unsubscribe();
    // Note: need to put original back in place
    // otherwise 'this' is undefined in component.ngOnDestroy
    component.ngOnDestroy = saved_OnDestroy;
    component.ngOnDestroy();

  };

  return sub;
};

// Create an Observable extension
Observable.prototype.subscribeAndGuard = subscribeAndGuard;

// Ref: https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/declaration-merging.html
declare module 'rxjs/Observable' {
  interface Observable<T> {
    subscribeAndGuard: typeof subscribeAndGuard;
  }
}

Here is a component with two subscriptions, one with the wrapper and one without. The only caveat is it must implement OnDestroy (with empty body if desired), otherwise Angular does not know to call the wrapped version.

import { Component, OnInit, OnDestroy } from '@angular/core';
import { Observable } from 'rxjs/Observable';
import 'rxjs/Rx';
import './subscribeAndGuard';

@Component({
  selector: 'app-subscribing',
  template: '<h3>Subscribing component is active</h3>',
})
export class SubscribingComponent implements OnInit, OnDestroy {

  ngOnInit() {

    // This subscription will be terminated after onDestroy
    Observable.interval(1000)
      .subscribeAndGuard(this,
        (data) => { console.log('Guarded:', data); },
        (error) => { },
        (/*completed*/) => { }
      );

    // This subscription will continue after onDestroy
    Observable.interval(1000)
      .subscribe(
        (data) => { console.log('Unguarded:', data); },
        (error) => { },
        (/*completed*/) => { }
      );
  }

  ngOnDestroy() {
    console.log('SubscribingComponent.OnDestroy');
  }
}

A demo plunker is here

An additional note: Re Edit 3 - The 'Official' Solution, this can be simplified by using takeWhile() instead of takeUntil() before subscriptions, and a simple boolean rather than another Observable in ngOnDestroy.

@Component({...})
export class SubscribingComponent implements OnInit, OnDestroy {

  iAmAlive = true;
  ngOnInit() {

    Observable.interval(1000)
      .takeWhile(() => { return this.iAmAlive; })
      .subscribe((data) => { console.log(data); });
  }

  ngOnDestroy() {
    this.iAmAlive = false;
  }
}

I like the last two answers, but I experienced an issue if the the subclass referenced "this" in ngOnDestroy.

I modified it to be this, and it looks like it resolved that issue.

export abstract class BaseComponent implements OnDestroy {
    protected componentDestroyed$: Subject<boolean>;
    constructor() {
        this.componentDestroyed$ = new Subject<boolean>();
        let f = this.ngOnDestroy;
        this.ngOnDestroy = function()  {
            // without this I was getting an error if the subclass had
            // this.blah() in ngOnDestroy
            f.bind(this)();
            this.componentDestroyed$.next(true);
            this.componentDestroyed$.complete();
        };
    }
    /// placeholder of ngOnDestroy. no need to do super() call of extended class.
    ngOnDestroy() {}
}
  • you need to use the arrow function in order to bind the 'this': this.ngOnDestroy = () => { f.bind(this)(); this.componentDestroyed$.complete(); }; – Damsorian Sep 14 '17 at 16:00

I tried seangwright's solution (Edit 3)

That is not working for Observable that created by timer or interval.

However, i got it working by using another approach:

import { Component, OnDestroy, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import 'rxjs/add/operator/takeUntil';
import { Subject } from 'rxjs/Subject';
import { Subscription } from 'rxjs/Subscription';
import 'rxjs/Rx';

import { MyThingService } from '../my-thing.service';

@Component({
   selector: 'my-thing',
   templateUrl: './my-thing.component.html'
})
export class MyThingComponent implements OnDestroy, OnInit {
   private subscriptions: Array<Subscription> = [];

  constructor(
     private myThingService: MyThingService,
   ) { }

  ngOnInit() {
    const newSubs = this.myThingService.getThings()
        .subscribe(things => console.log(things));
    this.subscriptions.push(newSubs);
  }

  ngOnDestroy() {
    for (const subs of this.subscriptions) {
      subs.unsubscribe();
   }
 }
}

You usually need to unsubscribe when the components get destroyed, but Angular is going to handle it more and more as we go, for example in new minor version of Angular4, they have this section for routing unsubscribe:

Do you need to unsubscribe?

As described in the ActivatedRoute: the one-stop-shop for route information section of the Routing & Navigation page, the Router manages the observables it provides and localizes the subscriptions. The subscriptions are cleaned up when the component is destroyed, protecting against memory leaks, so you don't need to unsubscribe from the route paramMap Observable.

Also the example below is a good example from Angular to create a component and destroy it after, look at how component implements OnDestroy, if you need onInit, you also can implements it in your component, like implements OnInit, OnDestroy

import { Component, Input, OnDestroy } from '@angular/core';  
import { MissionService } from './mission.service';
import { Subscription }   from 'rxjs/Subscription';

@Component({
  selector: 'my-astronaut',
  template: `
    <p>
      {{astronaut}}: <strong>{{mission}}</strong>
      <button
        (click)="confirm()"
        [disabled]="!announced || confirmed">
        Confirm
      </button>
    </p>
  `
})

export class AstronautComponent implements OnDestroy {
  @Input() astronaut: string;
  mission = '<no mission announced>';
  confirmed = false;
  announced = false;
  subscription: Subscription;

  constructor(private missionService: MissionService) {
    this.subscription = missionService.missionAnnounced$.subscribe(
      mission => {
        this.mission = mission;
        this.announced = true;
        this.confirmed = false;
    });
  }

  confirm() {
    this.confirmed = true;
    this.missionService.confirmMission(this.astronaut);
  }

  ngOnDestroy() {
    // prevent memory leak when component destroyed
    this.subscription.unsubscribe();
  }
}
  • 1
    Confused. What are you saying here? You(Angular recent docs/notes) seem to say that Angular takes care of it and then later to confirm that unsubscribe is a good pattern. Thanks. – jamie Oct 18 '17 at 6:51

Following the answer by @seangwright, I've written an abstract class that handles "infinite" observables' subscriptions in components:

import { OnDestroy } from '@angular/core';
import { Subscription } from 'rxjs/Subscription';
import { Subject } from 'rxjs/Subject';
import { Observable } from 'rxjs/Observable';
import { PartialObserver } from 'rxjs/Observer';

export abstract class InfiniteSubscriberComponent implements OnDestroy {
  private onDestroySource: Subject<any> = new Subject();

  constructor() {}

  subscribe(observable: Observable<any>): Subscription;

  subscribe(
    observable: Observable<any>,
    observer: PartialObserver<any>
  ): Subscription;

  subscribe(
    observable: Observable<any>,
    next?: (value: any) => void,
    error?: (error: any) => void,
    complete?: () => void
  ): Subscription;

  subscribe(observable: Observable<any>, ...subscribeArgs): Subscription {
    return observable
      .takeUntil(this.onDestroySource)
      .subscribe(...subscribeArgs);
  }

  ngOnDestroy() {
    this.onDestroySource.next();
    this.onDestroySource.complete();
  }
}

To use it, just extend it in your angular component and call the subscribe() method as follows:

this.subscribe(someObservable, data => doSomething());

It also accepts the error and complete callbacks as usual, an observer object, or not callbacks at all. Remember to call super.ngOnDestroy() if you are also implementing that method in the child component.

Find here an additional reference by Ben Lesh: RxJS: Don’t Unsubscribe.

Another short addition to the above mentioned situations is:

  • Always unsubscribe, when new values in the subscribed stream is no more required or don't matter, it will result in way less number of triggers and increase in performance in a few cases. Cases such as components where the subscribed data/event no more exists or a new subscription to an all new stream is required (refresh, etc.) is a good example for unsubscription.

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