23

I'm writing a custom java 8 collector which is supposed to compute the average of a POJO which has a getValue() method. Here's the code:

public static Collector<BoltAggregationData, BigDecimal[], BigDecimal> avgCollector = new Collector<BoltAggregationData, BigDecimal[], BigDecimal>() {

        @Override
        public Supplier<BigDecimal[]> supplier() {
            return () -> {
                BigDecimal[] start = new BigDecimal[2];
                start[0] = BigDecimal.ZERO;
                start[1] = BigDecimal.ZERO;
                return start;
            };
        }

        @Override
        public BiConsumer<BigDecimal[], BoltAggregationData> accumulator() {
            return (a,b) ->  {
                a[0] = a[0].add(b.getValue());
                a[1] = a[1].add(BigDecimal.ONE);
            };
        }

        @Override
        public BinaryOperator<BigDecimal[]> combiner() {
            return (a,b) -> {
                a[0] = a[0].add(b[0]);
                a[1] = a[1].add(b[1]);
                return a;
            };
        }

        @Override
        public Function<BigDecimal[], BigDecimal> finisher() {
            return (a) -> {
                return a[0].divide(a[1], 6 , RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
            };
        }

        private final Set<Characteristics> CHARACTERISTICS = new HashSet<Characteristics>(Arrays.asList(Characteristics.CONCURRENT, Characteristics.UNORDERED));

        @Override
        public Set<Characteristics> characteristics() {
            return CHARACTERISTICS;
        }

    };

It all works well in the non-parallel case. However, when I use a parallelStream(), it sometimes doesn't work. For example, given the values from 1 to 10, it computes( 53/9 instead of 55/10). When debugging the debugger never hits the breakpoint in the combiner() function. Is there some kind of flag that I need to set?

  • I did upvote both, thanks for your answer too :) I just found the other answer somehow clearer. Thanks for the tip on the EnumSet too. – Martin Boyanov Jun 24 '16 at 8:47
  • 1
    That’s ok, I just noticed that you accepted (or tried to accept) both in a short time interval, so I just wanted to clear potential confusion. – Holger Jun 24 '16 at 8:55
  • Note there are much better ways to do this, for example a cumulative moving average. – Boris the Spider Jun 24 '16 at 10:16
  • 2
    As a side note, you could still size down your code by using Collector.of, if you're using an anonymous class any ways... – Jorn Vernee Jun 24 '16 at 11:59
  • 2
    If we are at additional ways to improve the code, there are array initializers: BigDecimal[] start = { BigDecimal.ZERO, BigDecimal.ZERO }; return start; or () -> new BigDecimal[] { BigDecimal.ZERO, BigDecimal.ZERO } using the … -> expression form, which is also applicable to the finisher: a -> a[0].divide(a[1], 6 , RoundingMode.HALF_UP). – Holger Jun 24 '16 at 14:56
23

It looks like the problem is the CONCURRENT characteristic, which does something else than you would think it might:

Indicates that this collector is concurrent, meaning that the result container can support the accumulator function being called concurrently with the same result container from multiple threads.

Instead of calling the combiner, the accumulator is being called concurrently, using the same BigDecimal[] a for all threads. The access to a is not atomic, so it goes wrong:

Thread1 -> retrieves value of a[0]: 3
Thread2 -> retrieves value of a[0]: 3
Thread1 -> adds own value: 3 + 3 = 6
Thread2 -> adds own value: 3 + 4 = 7
Thread1 -> writes 6 to a[0]
Thread2 -> writes 7 to a[0]

Making the value of a[0] 7 when it should be 10. The same kind of thing can happen with a[1], so results can be inconsistent.


If you remove the CONCURRENT characteristic, the combiner will get used instead.

  • Would it do to use an AtomicInteger (or AtomicLong) instead of a BigInteger instead? Could the CONCURRENT characteristic be used then? – dcsohl Jun 24 '16 at 20:37
  • 2
    @dcsohl During testing I found that surrounding the to lines in the accumulator with synchronized(this){...} also solved the problem. But my intuition says that the use of this characteristic should not be forced, but rather used if the result container supports concurrent operations any ways. – Jorn Vernee Jun 24 '16 at 21:02
  • 1
    @dcsohl: of course, making the accumulator function thread safe can solve the problem, as that’s what the CONCURRENT characteristic implies, that this function is thread safe. However, it also suggests a performance benefit of concurrent evaluation over local accumulation plus merging, which is not the case here (it’s rarely the case). – Holger Jun 27 '16 at 10:51
18

Well, that’s exactly what you request when specifying Characteristics.CONCURRENT:

Indicates that this collector is concurrent, meaning that the result container can support the accumulator function being called concurrently with the same result container from multiple threads.

If that’s not the case, as with your Collector, you shouldn’t specify that flag.


As a side note, new HashSet<Characteristics>(Arrays.asList(Characteristics.CONCURRENT, Characteristics.UNORDERED)); is quite inefficient for specifying characteristics. You can just use EnumSet.of(Characteristics.CONCURRENT, Characteristics.UNORDERED). When you remove the wrong concurrent characteristic, you may use either EnumSet.of(Characteristics.UNORDERED) or Collections.singleton(Characteristics.UNORDERED), but a HashSet definitely is overkill.

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