2

Does node-oracledb escape / sanitize queries? It has parameterized queries via binding:

connection.execute(
  "INSERT INTO countries VALUES (:country_id, :country_name)",
  [90, "Tonga"],
  function(err, result)
  {
    if (err)
      console.error(err.message);
    else
      console.log("Rows inserted " + result.rowsAffected);
  });

I looked in the documentation and took a quick ready through of the source code, but nowhere does it state nor show that it escapes the queries.

If it does not, I was thinking of using a combination of node-mysql as well as copious predicates on the user input and queries before passing to the connection.execute method.

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1

The driver doesn't do the escaping, the database does, but only when you use bind variables rather than string concatenation.

The example you showed is correct and safe.

Here's an example of how to do it the WRONG way which opens you up to SQL injection:

connection.execute(
  "INSERT INTO countries VALUES (" + countryId + ",'" + countryName + "')",
  function(err, result)
  {
    if (err)
      console.error(err.message);
    else
      console.log("Rows inserted " + result.rowsAffected);
  });
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 1
    Indeed, the stated purpose of "binding parameters" is so that any included value cannot possibly be mis-interpreted as "part of the SQL string." You do not have to "sanitize" the string, because the string that is in your source-code is the (only) SQL string that the server will receive. Of course, this does not relieve your application from the requirement to validate the values that are going to be inserted into your database! To be sure that they do not contain rogue content which will create problems when the data is subsequently retrieved and used. – Mike Robinson Jun 24 '16 at 14:43
  • 1
    The DB doesn't do any 'escaping' with bind variables. Escaping is not needed as @MikeRobinson explained. The data that is stored in the DB is the data the user wanted stored. – Christopher Jones Jun 28 '16 at 22:52
0

To add to what Dan just said, here is (more or less) what would be the right way:

The SQL query string would now look like this:

'INSERT INTO countries VALUES(?,?)'

(NOTICE! that the question-marks are not in quotes!)

This SQL specifies that the two values to be inserted are "parameters." Therefore, specific values must be "bound to" both of these parameters, each and every time the statement is executed.

The SQL engine will retrieve the values for each parameter directly from whatever data-source has been bound to them, "this time." Therefore, regardless of "what (text) they happen to contain," SQL will never consider them to be "part of the SQL statement, itself."

(And so, if you happen to occasionally find that one or the other of the columns in your countries table contains: "foo; drop table countries", as no doubt they will, you'll know ... ;-) exactly what to do with those ["nice try, Loser!" ...] rows.)


EDIT: As Christopher Jones kindly pointed out in a reply to this post, Oracle uses a different syntax to identify parameters. Nevertheless, the essential idea remains the same: “the SQL query,” as presented to the engine, contains specifications that call for input-values which must be supplied at runtime, each and every time the statement is executed. These values stand entirely separate from the SQL statement itself and will never be mis-construed as being part of it. Use the syntax that is called-for by whatever SQL engine you are using.

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  • Oracle doesn't use '?' to indicate bind parameters. It uses the colon-name or colon-number syntax, e.g. ':country_id' or ':1' – Christopher Jones Jul 5 '16 at 0:50
  • Thank you for making this very important clarification! I have edited my comment to include it. – Mike Robinson Jul 6 '16 at 1:15

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