47

Unfortunately the new Core Data semantics make me crazy. My previous question had a clean code that didn't work because of incorrect auto generation of header files. Now I continue my work with deleting objects. My code seems to be very simple:

func deleteProfile(withID: Int) {
    let fetchRequest: NSFetchRequest<Profile> = Profile.fetchRequest()
    fetchRequest.predicate = Predicate.init(format: "profileID==\(withID)")
    let object = try! context.fetch(fetchRequest)
    context.delete(object)
} 

I did a "hard" debug with print(object) instead of context.delete(object) and it showed me the right object. So I need just to delete it.

P.S. there is no deleteObject. Now NSManagedContext has only public func delete(_ sender: AnyObject?)

  • Unless things have changed in Swift 3 (apologies if they have), the fetch will return an array of objects even if there is only one that matches your predicate. You need either to loop through the results (safest) or use object[0] to access the first object in the array. – pbasdf Jun 24 '16 at 16:06
68

The result of a fetch is an array of managed objects, in your case [Event], so you can enumerate the array and delete all matching objects. Example (using try? instead of try! to avoid a crash in the case of a fetch error):

if let result = try? context.fetch(fetchRequest) {
    for object in result {
        context.delete(object)
    }
}

If no matching objects exist then the fetch succeeds, but the resulting array is empty.


Note: In your code, object has the type [Event] and therefore in

context.delete(object)

the compiler creates a call to the

public func delete(_ sender: AnyObject?)

method of NSObject instead of the expected

public func delete(_ object: NSManagedObject)

method of NSManagedObjectContext. That is why your code compiles but fails at runtime.

  • Bless you ! This is has helped me ! – user3739902 Sep 22 '16 at 20:23
  • 12
    Don't forget to call try context.save() as mentioned in another answer. – Ivan Yurchenko May 11 '17 at 8:41
  • Good insights too. – ScottyBlades Sep 9 '17 at 0:20
  • @MartinR As @IvanYurchenko mentioned try context.save() need to be there right ? – Jack Apr 19 '18 at 6:13
  • 1
    @Jack: Sure, you eventually have to save the context to make the changes permanent. – Martin R Apr 19 '18 at 6:38
40

The trick here, it is save context after delete your objects.

let fetchRequest: NSFetchRequest<Profile> = Profile.fetchRequest()
fetchRequest.predicate = Predicate.init(format: "profileID==\(withID)")
let objects = try! context.fetch(fetchRequest)
for obj in objects {
    context.delete(obj)
}

do {
    try context.save() // <- remember to put this :)
} catch {
    // Do something... fatalerror
}

I hope this can help someone.

  • 2
    It sure helped me, thank you! – Cyril Ivar Garcia Jan 16 '17 at 5:37
  • 3
    Getting error:- Cannot convert value of type '[Entity]' to expected argument type 'NSManagedObject' on the line context.delete(object) – amish Jan 1 '18 at 8:31
  • @amish the fetchRequest returns an Array. So the var should be called objects. After you just do a for loop (for object in objects) and in the for loop you can delete each object – Sonius Mar 7 '18 at 10:29
18

Delete core data objects swift 3

// MARK: Delete Data Records

func deleteRecords() -> Void {
    let moc = getContext()
    let fetchRequest = NSFetchRequest<NSFetchRequestResult>(entityName: "Person")

     let result = try? moc.fetch(fetchRequest)
        let resultData = result as! [Person]

        for object in resultData {
            moc.delete(object)
        }

        do {
            try moc.save()
            print("saved!")
        } catch let error as NSError  {
            print("Could not save \(error), \(error.userInfo)")
        } catch {

        }

}

// MARK: Get Context

func getContext () -> NSManagedObjectContext {
    let appDelegate = UIApplication.shared.delegate as! AppDelegate
    return appDelegate.persistentContainer.viewContext
} 
9
func deleteRecords() {
    let delegate = UIApplication.shared.delegate as! AppDelegate
    let context = delegate.persistentContainer.viewContext

    let deleteFetch = NSFetchRequest<NSFetchRequestResult>(entityName: "nameofentity")
    let deleteRequest = NSBatchDeleteRequest(fetchRequest: deleteFetch)

    do {
        try context.execute(deleteRequest)
        try context.save()
    } catch {
        print ("There was an error")
    }
}
  • This is way better than most of the answers here! > "A request to Core Data to do a batch delete of data in a persistent store without loading any data into memory." – Firo Aug 8 '18 at 18:55
  • @Firo This is actually the best answer, unless you need to write code that works before 10.11 as before 10.11 NSBatchDeleteRequest didn't exist. In any other case, this will make CoreData directly delete the data in the database, skipping all processing to load any data first and skipping any memory usage for storing the data after the fetch. – Mecki Feb 13 at 17:57
3

Swift 4.1 & 4.2

     let appDelegate = UIApplication.shared.delegate as! AppDelegate
     let context = appDelegate.persistentContainer.viewContext
     let requestDel = NSFetchRequest<NSFetchRequestResult>(entityName: "Users")
     requestDel.returnsObjectsAsFaults = false
  // If you want to delete data on basis of some condition then you can use NSPredicate
  //  let predicateDel = NSPredicate(format: "age > %d", argumentArray: [10])
  // requestDel.predicate = predicateDel


     do {
          let arrUsrObj = try context.fetch(requestDel)
          for usrObj in arrUsrObj as! [NSManagedObject] { // Fetching Object
              context.delete(usrObj) // Deleting Object
         }
     } catch {
          print("Failed")
     }

    // Saving the Delete operation
     do {
         try context.save()
     } catch {
         print("Failed saving")
     }
2

Swift 4 without using string for Entity

let fetchRequest: NSFetchRequest<Profile> = Profile.fetchRequest()
fetchRequest.predicate = Predicate.init(format: "profileID==\(withID)")

do {
    let objects = try context.fetch(fetchRequest)
    for object in objects {
        context.delete(object)
    }
    try context.save()
} catch _ {
    // error handling
}
0

Delete the object from core data

let entity = NSEntityDescription.entity(forEntityName: "Students", in: managedContext)
        let request = NSFetchRequest<NSFetchRequestResult>()
        request.entity = entity
        if let result = try? managedContext.fetch(request) {
            for object in result {
                managedContext.delete(object as! NSManagedObject)
            }
            txtName.text = ""
            txtPhone.text = ""
            txt_Address.text = ""
            labelStatus.text = "Deleted"

        }
0

Delete Core Data Object with query in Swift 5, 4.2

let fetchrequest = NSFetchRequest<Your_Model>(entityName: "Your_Entity_Name")
fetchrequest.predicate = NSPredicate(format: "any your_key == %d", your_value)

hope this will help to someone

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