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i understand quite well as to how printf() and format specifier works

NOTE:- I am using Turbo c/c++ compiler and ye si know gcc,g++,etc are way better but the problem remains same

code:-

void main()
{
 clrscr();
 printf("%d %d %d");
 getch();
}

output:- 0 344 0

now,

code:-

void main()
{
 clrscr();
 printf("%f %f %f");
 getch();
}

output:- printf : floating point formats not linked Abnormal program termination.

now , also note that i have tried this on around 200 systems.

Question:-I believe that those format specifier numbers that are displayed on the output are not garbage as for every system same result is obtained and their is some link between printf() function and format specifier through file handling or pointer. So can anyone now finally tell what it might be?

note:-result may vary from IDE to IDE but is same for a compiler on every system as i have tried this on codeblocks IDE also.

  • 1
    "I believe that those format specifier numbers that are displayed on the output are not garbage" - you're invoking undefined behavior. Belief is the only thing you have going for you, because everything else has already gone out the window. – WhozCraig Jun 26 '16 at 10:15
  • 2
    This is undefined behavior. You're using format specifiers that require additional arguments, but you're failing to provide them. So you're getting unspecified garbage. You're also declaring main incorrectly. It returns an int, and needs to be declared as such. – Tom Karzes Jun 26 '16 at 10:15
  • like i said i have tested this on a large no. of systems so yes i believe cause the result on all systems for both compiler was same also turbo c compiler is actually the borland c compiler created by Dennis Ritchie and edited by the folks at borland and according to ANSI C main can have void return type. – NeoR Jun 26 '16 at 10:22
  • 2
    Are you sure your Turbo C compiler supports floating points? Or maybe a special option is required to turn this support on? Read this c-faq.com/fp/fpnotlinked.html – mvidelgauz Jun 26 '16 at 10:50
  • This question is utterly uninteresting and should be closed. If you really want to see what your random stack accesses are doing on your platform, look at the assembly code and figure it out. It's a tedious waste of time, but not at all hard. So do it and be done with it. – Tom Karzes Jun 26 '16 at 11:24
4

So can anyone now finally tell what it might be?

From the C11 Standard (draft) for the library function fprintf():

7.21.6.1/2

[...]

If there are insufficient arguments for the format, the behavior is undefined.

After code has invoked undefined behaviour anything could happen.

  • I understand that and though the draft says that shouldn't the result vary on different systems then i could understand the undefined behaviour also i have understanding of compiler design so i am currently viewing it as an undefined automata in the compiler design. – NeoR Jun 26 '16 at 10:29
0

output:- printf : floating point formats not linked Abnormal program termination.

Turbo C and some compilers do not link in the floating point support unless floating point code is detected in user code. "%f %f %f" needs FP support to work, yet the compiler does not recognize it at compile time. Instead the program fails at run time.

Add FP code and get rid of other mis-use of printf();

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
int main() {
  clrscr();
  double a = sqrt(2.0):
  printf("%f %f %f\n",a,a,a);
  getch();
}

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