471

How do I find the start of the week (both Sunday and Monday) knowing just the current time in C#?

Something like:

DateTime.Now.StartWeek(Monday);

32 Answers 32

752
0

Use an extension method. They're the answer to everything, you know! ;)

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static DateTime StartOfWeek(this DateTime dt, DayOfWeek startOfWeek)
    {
        int diff = (7 + (dt.DayOfWeek - startOfWeek)) % 7;
        return dt.AddDays(-1 * diff).Date;
    }
}

Which can be used as follows:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Now.StartOfWeek(DayOfWeek.Monday);
DateTime dt = DateTime.Now.StartOfWeek(DayOfWeek.Sunday);
| improve this answer | |
  • 16
    You can simplify this as follows: int diff = dayOfWeek - dt.DayOfWeek; return dt.AddDays(diff).Date; – Troy Mar 28 '11 at 23:28
  • 13
    Troy, I do not believe your code works if the given date is a Sunday and your start of week is Monday. It will return (Sunday + 1) instead of (Sunday - 6) – Aaron Hoffman Apr 23 '12 at 14:55
  • 1
    This doesn't work if dt is UTC and is already the start of the week e.g. 2012-09-02 16:00:00Z which is Mon, 03 Sep 2012 00:00:00 in local time. So it needs to convert dt to local time or do something a bit smarter. It would also need to return the result as UTC if the input was UTC. – row1 Sep 6 '12 at 4:12
  • 1
    @row1 DateTime.Parse("2012-09-02 16:00:00Z") returns the local-time equivalent, and this method correctly returns the same time, as a local time. If you use DateTime.Parse("2012-09-02 16:00:00Z").ToUniversalTime() to explicitly pass the UTC time, this method correctly returns 6 days, 16 hours earlier, as a UTC time. It's working exactly as I'd expect. – Rawling Jan 22 '13 at 10:51
  • 1
    This would be off by one day for me sometimes. It worked for me once I stripped the time component from dt. I used int diff = dt.Date.DayOfWeek - startOfWeek; – Vincent Saelzler May 26 '17 at 17:43
81
0

Quickest way I can come up with is:

var sunday = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-(int)DateTime.Today.DayOfWeek);

If you would like any other day of the week to be your start date all you need to do is add the DayOfWeek value to the end

var monday = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-(int)DateTime.Today.DayOfWeek + (int)DayOfWeek.Monday);

var tuesday = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-(int)DateTime.Today.DayOfWeek + (int)DayOfWeek.Tuesday); 
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    the simplest answers are the best, this one worked fine, but culture depended – Cerveser Oct 8 '14 at 19:06
  • 7
    In Latvia week starts at Monday.. Actually.. I always wonder how can a week start on Sunday.. seems awkward to me.. ;) – 0xDEAD BEEF Feb 1 '16 at 16:39
  • This solution is good. In addition you could Make the start of the week any day by adding the DayOfWeek you want to start on. var sunday = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-(int)DateTime.Today.DayOfWeek); var monday = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-(int)DateTime.Today.DayOfWeek + (int)DayOfWeek.Monday); – Loligans Jun 14 '16 at 15:52
  • 7
    This added code does not work for the situation described by Threezol. If you want the start of the week to be Monday, on Sunday the calculation gives you the coming Monday, not the previous. – Giovanni B Aug 14 '17 at 19:49
  • 4
    Yes.. For sunday, it gives the next Modnay.. not the previous :P – Ajay Aradhya Feb 14 '18 at 6:27
64
0

A little more verbose and culture-aware:

System.Globalization.CultureInfo ci = 
    System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
DayOfWeek fdow = ci.DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek;
DayOfWeek today = DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek;
DateTime sow = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-(today - fdow)).Date;
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    got an error with this: today = SUNDAY; fdow = MONDAY; (today - fdow) == -1; DateTime.Now.AddDays(-(-1)).Date == DateTime.Now.AddDays(+1).Date; 01-02-2010 != 25-01-2010 !! – balexandre Jan 31 '10 at 22:44
  • 3
    If you try this on a Sunday, then it's basically doing AddDays(0 - 1) for en-GB. So it needs @Sarcastic's if statement – Chris S May 15 '11 at 14:30
  • 3
    You can also get the current culture using CultureInfo.CurrentCulture instead of pulling it off the thread like that. Seems like a weird way to access it. – Hank Dec 10 '12 at 18:09
  • 7
    Another issue: It is dangerous to call the Now property twice. If the current time happens to pass 24:00 (or 12:00 midnight) between the two calls, the date will have changed. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 2 '13 at 15:21
  • 1
    What this answer actually does is this: "inside the current .NET week (starting on sunday and ending on saturday, as per the numbering of the DayOfWeek enumeration), find the day of the .NET week that is the first one of the week in the current culture". This is probably not what you want. – Mathieu Renda Jul 12 '16 at 17:36
36
0

Using Fluent DateTime:

var monday = DateTime.Now.Previous(DayOfWeek.Monday);
var sunday = DateTime.Now.Previous(DayOfWeek.Sunday);
| improve this answer | |
  • 29
    I'd hate to take on a dependency just for this. "Know your dependencies and kill them" seems to come to mind. :) – Esteban Araya May 28 '10 at 3:36
  • 7
    Did anyone notice HOW "Fluent" is working? Just take a look at the code. It's using a do...while loop. Don't want to call it names but if I decide to do it won't be pleasant. public static DateTime Previous(this DateTime start, DayOfWeek day) { do { start = start.PreviousDay(); } while (start.DayOfWeek != day); return start; } – nsimeonov Apr 22 '13 at 21:10
  • 10
    @nsimeonov it is open source. please feel free to provide a better implementation rather then throwing stones. – Simon Apr 22 '13 at 22:57
  • 12
    Yeah, as if I had all the time in the world to fix every single bug in every open source software in the world... – nsimeonov Jun 4 '14 at 18:40
  • 1
23
0

Ugly but it at least gives the right dates back

With start of week set by system:

    public static DateTime FirstDateInWeek(this DateTime dt)
    {
        while (dt.DayOfWeek != System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek)
            dt = dt.AddDays(-1);
        return dt;
    }

Without:

    public static DateTime FirstDateInWeek(this DateTime dt, DayOfWeek weekStartDay)
    {
        while (dt.DayOfWeek != weekStartDay)
            dt = dt.AddDays(-1);
        return dt;
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    This really deserves more votes for its simplicity and readability. – ProfK Dec 7 '16 at 5:05
  • This resource helped, too: markb.uk/… (If you want to get the first/last day of a week or month). – FranzHuber23 May 6 '19 at 9:57
12
0

Let's combine the culture-safe answer and the extension method answer:

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static DateTime StartOfWeek(this DateTime dt, DayOfWeek startOfWeek)
    {
        System.Globalization.CultureInfo ci = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
        DayOfWeek fdow = ci.DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek;
        return DateTime.Today.AddDays(-(DateTime.Today.DayOfWeek- fdow));
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 12
    neither dt nor startOfWeek is used within your function, I guess the first one should be used instead of DateTime.Today – hultqvist May 4 '10 at 8:17
  • 2
    The context of the question is wanting an additional property to use off of Datetime in the same manner as .Today or .Now. I agree this is awkward,but it's what was asked for. – Joel Coehoorn Sep 14 '11 at 20:47
  • 8
    I know this is an old answer, but it's wrong on so many levels; in addition to totally ignoring the method arguments, the math will cause it to pick a future date in many cases. This should have been written to use dt instead of DateTime.Today, to wrap the math in an (offset + 7) % 7 to ensure a negative offset, to use a single-parameter method overload which passes the current culture's FirstDayOfWeek as the startOfWeek argument, and possibly (depending on the spec) to coerce a zero offset to a 7-day offset, so that "last Tuesday" doesn't return today if it's already Tuesday. – Aaronaught Jan 23 '12 at 15:34
10
0

This would give you the preceding Sunday (I think):

DateTime t = DateTime.Now;
t -= new TimeSpan ((int) t.DayOfWeek, 0, 0, 0);
| improve this answer | |
9
0

This may be a bit of a hack, but you can cast the .DayOfWeek property to an int (it's an enum and since its not had its underlying data type changed it defaults to int) and use that to determine the previous start of the week.

It appears the week specified in the DayOfWeek enum starts on Sunday, so if we subtract 1 from this value that'll be equal to how many days the Monday is before the current date. We also need to map the Sunday (0) to equal 7 so given 1 - 7 = -6 the Sunday will map to the previous Monday:-

DateTime now = DateTime.Now;
int dayOfWeek = (int)now.DayOfWeek;
dayOfWeek = dayOfWeek == 0 ? 7 : dayOfWeek;
DateTime startOfWeek = now.AddDays(1 - (int)now.DayOfWeek);

The code for the previous Sunday is simpler as we don't have to make this adjustment:-

DateTime now = DateTime.Now;
int dayOfWeek = (int)now.DayOfWeek;
DateTime startOfWeek = now.AddDays(-(int)now.DayOfWeek);
| improve this answer | |
9
0

For Monday

DateTime startAtMonday = DateTime.Now.AddDays(DayOfWeek.Monday - DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek);

For Sunday

DateTime startAtSunday = DateTime.Now.AddDays(DayOfWeek.Sunday- DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek);
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I had a different application need, however I used this to get me going. I like it because it is the simplest one, without any casting - keeping the operations in the same/appropriate types. – qxotk Jan 29 '19 at 15:04
  • 1
    This doesn't work when the day is Sunday. It gives the following Monday, not the start of the current week. – Grant J Nov 6 '19 at 13:31
  • Also did you copy the Sunday or the Monday. I have 2 answers One if you want for Monday and 2on if you want for Sunday..... I just tested it and it works fine to me. DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek; Sunday And Result DateTime.Now.AddDays(DayOfWeek.Sunday - DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek); {10/11/2019 4:14:55 μμ} Date: {10/11/2019 12:00:00 πμ} Day: 10 DayOfWeek: Sunday DayOfYear: 314 Hour: 16 Kind: Local Millisecond: 172 Minute: 14 Month: 11 Second: 55 Ticks: 637089992951723516 TimeOfDay: {16:14:55.1723516} Year: 2019 – George Stavrou Nov 6 '19 at 14:15
  • @GrantJ What line did you take??? I just tested and it works fine. – George Stavrou Nov 6 '19 at 14:21
  • I tried the first one, substituting your DateTime.Now with a DateTime representing Sunday 10th November 2019. It should give Monday 4th Nov 2019 but it gives Monday 11th November 2019. I've set up a fiddle demonstrating it here: dotnetfiddle.net/Jw3ZiO – Grant J Nov 7 '19 at 15:33
5
0
using System;
using System.Globalization;

namespace MySpace
{
    public static class DateTimeExtention
    {
        // ToDo: Need to provide culturaly neutral versions.

        public static DateTime GetStartOfWeek(this DateTime dt)
        {
            DateTime ndt = dt.Subtract(TimeSpan.FromDays((int)dt.DayOfWeek));
            return new DateTime(ndt.Year, ndt.Month, ndt.Day, 0, 0, 0, 0);
        }

        public static DateTime GetEndOfWeek(this DateTime dt)
        {
            DateTime ndt = dt.GetStartOfWeek().AddDays(6);
            return new DateTime(ndt.Year, ndt.Month, ndt.Day, 23, 59, 59, 999);
        }

        public static DateTime GetStartOfWeek(this DateTime dt, int year, int week)
        {
            DateTime dayInWeek = new DateTime(year, 1, 1).AddDays((week - 1) * 7);
            return dayInWeek.GetStartOfWeek();
        }

        public static DateTime GetEndOfWeek(this DateTime dt, int year, int week)
        {
            DateTime dayInWeek = new DateTime(year, 1, 1).AddDays((week - 1) * 7);
            return dayInWeek.GetEndOfWeek();
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    First off, welcome to the community :) There are already several high quality answers to this question, most of which were posted seven years ago when the question was asked. While it may be a worthwhile exercise to attempt to answer simple questions such as this one in order to further your programming abilities, posting this answer in its current state does not add anything to the question. If there is something novel about your answer, please take a couple sentences to explain how it's different and why that makes it better. – MTCoster Dec 5 '15 at 18:02
4
0

Putting it all together, with Globalization and allowing for specifying the first day of the week as part of the call we have

public static DateTime StartOfWeek ( this DateTime dt, DayOfWeek? firstDayOfWeek )
{
    DayOfWeek fdow;

    if ( firstDayOfWeek.HasValue  )
    {
        fdow = firstDayOfWeek.Value;
    }
    else
    {
        System.Globalization.CultureInfo ci = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
        fdow = ci.DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek;
    }

    int diff = dt.DayOfWeek - fdow;

    if ( diff < 0 )
    {
        diff += 7;
    }

    return dt.AddDays( -1 * diff ).Date;

}
| improve this answer | |
4
0
var now = System.DateTime.Now;

var result = now.AddDays(-((now.DayOfWeek - System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek + 7) % 7)).Date;
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2
0

This would give you midnight on the first Sunday of the week:

DateTime t = DateTime.Now;
t -= new TimeSpan ((int) t.DayOfWeek, t.Hour, t.Minute, t.Second);

This gives you the first Monday at midnight:

DateTime t = DateTime.Now;
t -= new TimeSpan ((int) t.DayOfWeek - 1, t.Hour, t.Minute, t.Second);
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2
0

try with this in c#.With this code you can get both first date and last date of a given week.Here Sunday is the first day and Saturday is the last day but you can set both day's according to your culture

DateTime firstDate = GetFirstDateOfWeek(DateTime.Parse("05/09/2012").Date,DayOfWeek.Sunday);
DateTime lastDate = GetLastDateOfWeek(DateTime.Parse("05/09/2012").Date, DayOfWeek.Saturday);

public static DateTime GetFirstDateOfWeek(DateTime dayInWeek, DayOfWeek firstDay)
{
    DateTime firstDayInWeek = dayInWeek.Date;
    while (firstDayInWeek.DayOfWeek != firstDay)
        firstDayInWeek = firstDayInWeek.AddDays(-1);

    return firstDayInWeek;
}
public static DateTime GetLastDateOfWeek(DateTime dayInWeek, DayOfWeek firstDay)
{
    DateTime lastDayInWeek = dayInWeek.Date;
    while (lastDayInWeek.DayOfWeek != firstDay)
        lastDayInWeek = lastDayInWeek.AddDays(1);

    return lastDayInWeek;
}
| improve this answer | |
2
0

Tried several but did not solve the issue with a week starting on a Monday, resulting in giving me the coming Monday on a Sunday. So I modified it a bit and got it working with this code:

int delta = DayOfWeek.Monday - DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek;
DateTime monday = DateTime.Now.AddDays(delta == 1 ? -6 : delta);
return monday;
| improve this answer | |
  • It seems that the problem of the 'coming Monday' is culture dependant (see also answer from Eric and the comment from Cerveser.) However, if you don't need to take Sundays into account (as with usual business appointments) your formula can simplified: dt.AddDays(DayOfWeek.Monday - dt.DayOfWeek); – Damian Vogel Jul 11 '18 at 9:03
2
0

Step 1: Create a static class

  public static class TIMEE
{
    public static DateTime StartOfWeek(this DateTime dt, DayOfWeek startOfWeek)
    {
        int diff = (7 + (dt.DayOfWeek - startOfWeek)) % 7;
        return dt.AddDays(-1 * diff).Date;
    }
    public static DateTime EndOfWeek(this DateTime dt, DayOfWeek startOfWeek)
    {
        int diff = (7 - (dt.DayOfWeek - startOfWeek)) % 7;
        return dt.AddDays(1 * diff).Date;
    }
}

Step2: Use this class to get both start and end day of the week

 DateTime dt =TIMEE.StartOfWeek(DateTime.Now ,DayOfWeek.Monday);
        DateTime dt1 = TIMEE.EndOfWeek(DateTime.Now, DayOfWeek.Sunday);
| improve this answer | |
  • End of Week required (6 - (dt.DayOfWeek - startOfWeek)) % 7 for me against the unit tests I wrote. – mlhDev Dec 23 '19 at 17:27
1
0

The following method should return the DateTime that you want. Pass in true for Sunday being the first day of the week, false for Monday:

private DateTime getStartOfWeek(bool useSunday)
{
    DateTime now = DateTime.Now;
    int dayOfWeek = (int)now.DayOfWeek;

    if(!useSunday)
        dayOfWeek--;

    if(dayOfWeek < 0)
    {// day of week is Sunday and we want to use Monday as the start of the week
    // Sunday is now the seventh day of the week
        dayOfWeek = 6;
    }

    return now.AddDays(-1 * (double)dayOfWeek);
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Thanks for the examples. I needed to always use the "CurrentCulture" first day of the week and for an array I needed to know the exact Daynumber.. so here are my first extensions:

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    //http://stackoverflow.com/questions/38039/how-can-i-get-the-datetime-for-the-start-of-the-week
    //http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1788508/calculate-date-with-monday-as-dayofweek1
    public static DateTime StartOfWeek(this DateTime dt)
    {
        //difference in days
        int diff = (int)dt.DayOfWeek - (int)CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek; //sunday=always0, monday=always1, etc.

        //As a result we need to have day 0,1,2,3,4,5,6 
        if (diff < 0)
        {
            diff += 7;
        }
        return dt.AddDays(-1 * diff).Date;
    }

    public static int DayNoOfWeek(this DateTime dt)
    {
        //difference in days
        int diff = (int)dt.DayOfWeek - (int)CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek; //sunday=always0, monday=always1, etc.

        //As a result we need to have day 0,1,2,3,4,5,6 
        if (diff < 0)
        {
            diff += 7;
        }
        return diff + 1; //Make it 1..7
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

No one seems to have answered this correctly yet. I'll paste my solution here in case anyone needs it. The following code works regardless if first day of the week is a monday or a sunday or something else.

public static class DateTimeExtension
{
  public static DateTime GetFirstDayOfThisWeek(this DateTime d)
  {
    CultureInfo ci = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
    var first = (int)ci.DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek;
    var current = (int)d.DayOfWeek;

    var result = first <= current ?
      d.AddDays(-1 * (current - first)) :
      d.AddDays(first - current - 7);

    return result;
  }
}

class Program
{
  static void Main()
  {
    System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US");
    Console.WriteLine("Current culture set to en-US");
    RunTests();
    Console.WriteLine();
    System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("da-DK");
    Console.WriteLine("Current culture set to da-DK");
    RunTests();
    Console.ReadLine();
  }

  static void RunTests()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Today {1}: {0}", DateTime.Today.Date.GetFirstDayOfThisWeek(), DateTime.Today.Date.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd"));
    Console.WriteLine("Saturday 2013-03-02: {0}", new DateTime(2013, 3, 2).GetFirstDayOfThisWeek());
    Console.WriteLine("Sunday 2013-03-03: {0}", new DateTime(2013, 3, 3).GetFirstDayOfThisWeek());
    Console.WriteLine("Monday 2013-03-04: {0}", new DateTime(2013, 3, 4).GetFirstDayOfThisWeek());
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Modulo in C# works bad for -1mod7 (should be 6, c# returns -1) so... "oneliner" solution to this will look like this :)

private static DateTime GetFirstDayOfWeek(DateTime date)
    {
        return date.AddDays(-(((int)date.DayOfWeek - 1) - (int)Math.Floor((double)((int)date.DayOfWeek - 1) / 7) * 7));
    }
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Same for end of week (in style of @Compile This's answer):

    public static DateTime EndOfWeek(this DateTime dt)
    {
        int diff = 7 - (int)dt.DayOfWeek;

        diff = diff == 7 ? 0 : diff;

        DateTime eow = dt.AddDays(diff).Date;

        return new DateTime(eow.Year, eow.Month, eow.Day, 23, 59, 59, 999) { };
    }
| improve this answer | |
0
0

You could use the excellent Umbrella library:

using nVentive.Umbrella.Extensions.Calendar;
DateTime beginning = DateTime.Now.BeginningOfWeek();

However, they do seem to have stored Monday as the first day of the week (see the property nVentive.Umbrella.Extensions.Calendar.DefaultDateTimeCalendarExtensions.WeekBeginsOn), so that previous localized solution is a bit better. Unfortunate.

Edit: looking closer at the question, it looks like Umbrella might actually work for that too:

// Or DateTime.Now.PreviousDay(DayOfWeek.Monday)
DateTime monday = DateTime.Now.PreviousMonday(); 
DateTime sunday = DateTime.Now.PreviousSunday();

Although it's worth noting that if you ask for the previous Monday on a Monday, it'll give you seven days back. But this is also true if you use BeginningOfWeek, which seems like a bug :(.

| improve this answer | |
0
0

This will return both the beginning of the week and the end of the week dates:

    private string[] GetWeekRange(DateTime dateToCheck)
    {
        string[] result = new string[2];
        TimeSpan duration = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0); //One day 
        DateTime dateRangeBegin = dateToCheck;
        DateTime dateRangeEnd = DateTime.Today.Add(duration);

        dateRangeBegin = dateToCheck.AddDays(-(int)dateToCheck.DayOfWeek);
        dateRangeEnd = dateToCheck.AddDays(6 - (int)dateToCheck.DayOfWeek);

        result[0] = dateRangeBegin.Date.ToString();
        result[1] = dateRangeEnd.Date.ToString();
        return result;

    }

I have posted the complete code for calculating the begin/end of week, month, quarter and year on my blog ZamirsBlog

| improve this answer | |
0
0
    namespace DateTimeExample
    {
        using System;

        public static class DateTimeExtension
        {
            public static DateTime GetMonday(this DateTime time)
            {
                if (time.DayOfWeek != DayOfWeek.Monday)
                    return GetMonday(time.AddDays(-1)); //Recursive call

                return time;
            }
        }

        internal class Program
        {
            private static void Main()
            {
                Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.GetMonday());
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    } 
| improve this answer | |
  • Can you expand your answer to include an explanation of your code? It helps the reader more than you might think. – gunr2171 Oct 2 '14 at 19:22
  • Using recursion is a very poor implementation. Just because you could use recursions doesn't mean you should. It would be slower and more memory intensive than other solutions provided here. – mikecamimo Aug 30 '17 at 22:45
0
0

Here is a combination of a few of the answers. It uses an extension method that allows the culture to be passed in, if one is not passed in, the current culture is used. This will give it max flexibility and re-use.

/// <summary>
/// Gets the date of the first day of the week for the date.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="date">The date to be used</param>
/// <param name="cultureInfo">If none is provided, the current culture is used</param>
/// <returns>The date of the beggining of the week based on the culture specifed</returns>
public static DateTime StartOfWeek(this DateTime date, CultureInfo cultureInfo=null) =>         
             date.AddDays(-1 * (7 + (date.DayOfWeek - (cultureInfo??CultureInfo.CurrentCulture).DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek)) % 7).Date;

Example Usage:

public static void TestFirstDayOfWeekExtension() {          
        DateTime date = DateTime.Now;
        foreach(System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture in CultureInfo.GetCultures(CultureTypes.UserCustomCulture | CultureTypes.SpecificCultures)) {
            Console.WriteLine($"{culture.EnglishName}: {date.ToShortDateString()} First Day of week: {date.StartOfWeek(culture).ToShortDateString()}");
        }
    }
| improve this answer | |
0
0

if you want saturday or sunday or any day of week but not exceeding current week(Sat-Sun) I got you covered with this piece of code.

public static DateTime GetDateInCurrentWeek(this DateTime date, DayOfWeek day)
{
    var temp = date;
    var limit = (int)date.DayOfWeek;
    var returnDate = DateTime.MinValue;

    if (date.DayOfWeek == day) return date;

    for (int i = limit; i < 6; i++)
    {
        temp = temp.AddDays(1);

        if (day == temp.DayOfWeek)
        {
            returnDate = temp;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (returnDate == DateTime.MinValue)
    {
        for (int i = limit; i > -1; i++)
        {
            date = date.AddDays(-1);

            if (day == date.DayOfWeek)
            {
                returnDate = date;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    return returnDate;
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

We like one-liners : Get the difference between the current culture's first day of week and the current day then subtract the number of days from the current day

var weekStartDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-((int)now.DayOfWeek - (int)DateTimeFormatInfo.CurrentInfo.FirstDayOfWeek));
| improve this answer | |
0
0

Try to create a function which uses recursion. Your DateTime object is an input and function returns a new DateTime object which stands for the beginning of the week.

    DateTime WeekBeginning(DateTime input)
    {
        do
        {
            if (input.DayOfWeek.ToString() == "Monday")
                return input;
            else
                return WeekBeginning(input.AddDays(-1));
        } while (input.DayOfWeek.ToString() == "Monday");
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – David Buck Mar 27 at 19:56
0
0

Calculating this way lets you choose which day of the week indicates the start of a new week (in the example I chose Monday).

Note that doing this calculation for a day that is a Monday will give the current Monday and not the previous one.

//Replace with whatever input date you want
DateTime inputDate = DateTime.Now;

//For this example, weeks start on Monday
int startOfWeek = (int)DayOfWeek.Monday;

//Calculate the number of days it has been since the start of the week
int daysSinceStartOfWeek = ((int)inputDate.DayOfWeek + 7 - startOfWeek) % 7;

DateTime previousStartOfWeek = inputDate.AddDays(-daysSinceStartOfWeek);
| improve this answer | |
0
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Following on from Compile This' Answer, use the following method to obtain the date for any day of the week:

public static DateTime GetDayOfWeek(DateTime dateTime, DayOfWeek dayOfWeek)
{
   var monday = dateTime.Date.AddDays((7 + (dateTime.DayOfWeek - DayOfWeek.Monday) % 7) * -1);

   var diff = dayOfWeek - DayOfWeek.Monday;

   if (diff == -1)
   {
      diff = 6;
   }

   return monday.AddDays(diff);
} 
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