19

I'm getting the error below when trying to loop through a listbox and then remove the item.

List that this enumerator is bound to has been modified. An enumerator can only be used if the list does not change.

foreach (string s in listBox1.Items)
{
    MessageBox.Show(s);
    //do stuff with (s);
    listBox1.Items.Remove(s);
}

How can I remove the item and still loop through the contents?

37

Do you want to remove all items? If so, do the foreach first, then just use Items.Clear() to remove all of them afterwards.

Otherwise, perhaps loop backwards by indexer:

listBox1.BeginUpdate();
try {
  for(int i = listBox1.Items.Count - 1; i >= 0 ; i--) {
    // do with listBox1.Items[i]

    listBox1.Items.RemoveAt(i);
  }
} finally {
  listBox1.EndUpdate();
}
  • I'd love to know what that downvote is about!! – Marc Gravell Dec 19 '08 at 9:22
  • Me too Marc. +1 to counter act the injustice of it. – Binary Worrier Dec 19 '08 at 9:24
  • I'd love to know the reason for downvotes. Both for me and you! +1 – Mehrdad Afshari Dec 19 '08 at 9:27
  • @Binary Worrier: In fact upvotes do not really neutralize downvotes, due to 200 points reputation limit. – Mehrdad Afshari Dec 19 '08 at 9:28
  • @MehrdadAfshari But they do neutralize the negative effect they have on the answer's score. +1! :) – Rufus L May 22 '15 at 3:02
25

Everyone else has posted "going backwards" answer, so I'll give the alternative: create a list of items you want to remove, then remove them at the end:

List<string> removals = new List<string>();
foreach (string s in listBox1.Items)
{
    MessageBox.Show(s);
    //do stuff with (s);
    removals.Add(s);
}

foreach (string s in removals)
{
    listBox1.Items.Remove(s);
}

Sometimes the "work backwards" method is better, sometimes the above is better - particularly if you're dealing with a type which has a RemoveAll(collection) method. Worth knowing both though.

  • 3
    -1. listBox1.Items might contain objects other than string, in that case InvalidCastException will be thrown. – Mehrdad Afshari Dec 19 '08 at 9:53
  • 9
    If that were the case, the foreach loop in the sample code in the question would already have blown up. I was making the same assumption as the question did, which I think is pretty reasonable. – Jon Skeet Dec 19 '08 at 9:58
  • 1
    Yeah, I noticed it. It was just fun to downvote you for a reason for a minutes ;) – Mehrdad Afshari Dec 19 '08 at 9:59
  • At least you gave a reason :) – Jon Skeet Dec 19 '08 at 10:00
  • One day my rep will be greater than Jons and Mehdrad's combined. Muhahahaha! Assuming that people are required to give a reason for down-voting, of course. – Hamish Grubijan Aug 10 '10 at 2:56
11

Here my solution without going backward and without a temporary list

while (listBox1.Items.Count > 0)
{
  string s = listBox1.Items[0] as string;
  // do something with s
  listBox1.Items.RemoveAt(0);
}
  • +1 This is right on! – Edyn Jan 26 '12 at 17:10
  • 1
    @Fernando68 as the count of the ListBox is decreased every time an item is removed, the while condition will eventually equate to false and the loop will end. – Michael Murphy Nov 8 '15 at 9:46
1

You have to go through the collection from the last item to the first. this code is in vb

for i as integer= list.items.count-1 to 0 step -1
....
list.items.removeat(i)
next
1

Jefferson is right, you have to do it backwards.

Here's the c# equivalent:

for (var i == list.Items.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
{
    list.Items.RemoveAt(i);
}
  • We already know all that! Why repeat yourself? – Fandango68 Nov 5 '15 at 3:44
  • @Fernando68 Because back in 2008, there were people who can't translate from VB to C# :D – Jon Limjap Nov 6 '15 at 7:21
1

How about:

foreach(var s in listBox1.Items.ToArray())
{
    MessageBox.Show(s);
    //do stuff with (s);
    listBox1.Items.Remove(s);
}

The ToArray makes a copy of the list, so you don't need to worry about it changing the list while you are processing it.

1

while(listbox.Items.Remove(s)) ; should work, as well. However, I think the backwards solution is the fastest.

0

You can't make modification to the collection being iterated within the ForEach block.

A quick fix is to iterate over a copy of the collection. An easy way to make this copy is through the ArrayList constructor. The DataRowView objects in the copied collection will refer to, and be able to modify, the same underlying data as your code.

For Each item As DataRowView In New System.Collections.ArrayList(lbOrdersNeedToBeVoided.Items)

please read http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-AU/vbgeneral/thread/b4d1f649-d78a-4e5b-8ad8-1940e3379bed

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