32

I am getting warning " Boolean method is always inverted " on running lint in IntelliJ. I have several similar warnings in my codebase. Which basic coding style, am I missing?

public static boolean isBlueToothEnabled(){
    final BluetoothAdapter bluetoothAdapter = BluetoothAdapter.getDefaultAdapter();
    if(bluetoothAdapter != null)
        return bluetoothAdapter.isEnabled();
    return  false;
}
0

4 Answers 4

29

try to return false if bluetoothAdapter is null otherwise return the output of isEnabled()

public static boolean isBlueToothEnabled(){
    final BluetoothAdapter bluetoothAdapter = BluetoothAdapter.getDefaultAdapter();
    if(bluetoothAdapter == null){
        return false;
    }
    return bluetoothAdapter.isEnabled();
}

Read more:

In Clean Code, Robert Martin writes, “Negatives are just a bit harder to understand than positives. So, when possible, conditionals should be expressed as positives.” (Martin, [G29]). IntelliJ IDEA has three inspections to help you stay positive.

https://blog.jetbrains.com/idea/2014/09/the-inspection-connection-issue-2/ (Entry #4 Avoiding negative Conditionals)

https://www.jetbrains.com/help/idea/2016.1/invert-boolean.html

7
  • 3
    but what is the idea/purpose in switching the return value (I dont get it from the link you posted).
    – mobileDev
    Jun 27, 2016 at 7:30
  • 1
    This immediately leads to the question: how to disable that inspection.
    – Florian F
    Aug 29, 2019 at 13:11
  • this case looks valid. however, i have a one line method of this form: validationMessages.stream().anyMatch(m -> m.level() == Level.ERROR); and i get that same warning. doesn't make sense to me here.
    – dtc
    Jul 7, 2020 at 18:12
  • @dtc I did not really spend much time on that, but could you avoid that by usind noneMatch instead of anyMatch? Imho that should resolve the warning since your method woud return true if there is not error instead of true if there is an error. Let me know what you think. Jul 8, 2020 at 12:07
  • 2
    @SuppressWarnings("BooleanMethodIsAlwaysInverted") Jul 26, 2020 at 7:12
17

Summary: Method always called like !method(). It's more efficient to have less number of computation. Refactor the method and return oppositely and call the method without (!)


Why it happens

If we have a method foo()

    boolean foo()
    {
        if(condition == true)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }

And is only called like !foo(),

    class A
    {
        if(!foo())
            do something;
        ...
        if(!foo())
            do something else;
    }

Because we only call !foo() and did not call foo().

The warning asks us to use foo() in a positive way.

Remove the warning

By inverting the return value of the method foo(),

    boolean foo()
    {
        if(condition == true)
            return **false**;
        else
            return **true**;
    }

Now call the method

    class A
    {
        if(foo())
            do the same thing;
    }
4
  • 3
    That's great but is this just to remove warning? Any practical benefits? Like performance or something else, perhaps? Aug 27, 2018 at 13:42
  • 1
    Negligible but unnecessary Overhead for negating the result. If you have method calls which negates results more often than not, you have the same negation overhead Dec 10, 2018 at 7:51
  • "It's more efficient to have ..." shouldn't this performance problem be handled at the compiler-level?
    – Hzzkygcs
    Mar 1, 2021 at 3:24
  • 1
    @Hzzkygcs It is. The compiler simply replaces an ifne with an ifeq instruction in this case, and even in more complicated expressions like if (!foo() || bar()).
    – warmCabin
    Feb 14 at 8:52
4

I must say that there are cases where I think this warning isn't even fixable in a reasonable way. Take for example code looking like this:

boolean getInfo(Info info) {
    // Retrieve some info that can fail so the function returns true or false
}

void func() {
    Info info;

    if (!getInfo(info)) {
        // Failed; handle error, early out
        return;
    }

    // Do stuff

    if (!getInfo(info)) {
        // Failed; handle error, early out
        return;
    }

    // Do stuff

    if (!getInfo(info)) {
        // Failed; handle error, early out
        return;
    }

    // Do final calculations
}

What to do in a case like this? Rename the function to notGetInfo()? getDesinformation()? Don't early out of the function on failure resulting in a growing tree of brackets?

2
  • 2
    Agreed. For the sake of readability, this pattern is far better... at least for boolean returns. When I'm looking at the class' methods, it makes far more sense to see a method named getInfo than a failedToGetInfo or getInfoFailure method. It would confuse me as to the method's primary purpose; does it do something, or does it check for failure? On the other hand, in this case one could say it's more elegant (and still very readable) to have void getInfo(), and throw Exceptions on failure, with an explanation to be found in a stack trace, rather than returning a vague boolean.
    – Lambart
    Apr 13, 2021 at 0:35
  • This is a good solution, although if one expects getInfo to fail often then one have to consider the very high cost of exceptions in java. Apr 16, 2021 at 13:28
0

For simplify, See the code below:

public boolean isBoy(int sex){ return sex == boy};

if(!isBoy(sex)){ // todo}

If do so, it called inverted. How to solve? see the other code below:

public boolean isGirl(int sex){ return sex == girl};

if(isGirl(sex)){ // todo}

Because you need to judge the condition whether is a girl, So that you should avoid to judge whether is a boy and put a '!'.

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