1

Following up on How to use TypeToken to get type parameter?, it seems that if I instantiate a class using a factory method then TypeToken is no longer able to capture generic type parameters.

import com.google.common.reflect.TypeToken;

public class Test<E extends Enum<E>> {

    private static enum MyEnum {
        FIRST,
        SECOND
    };

    private final TypeToken<E> enumType = new TypeToken<E>(getClass()) {
    };

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test<MyEnum> container = new Test<MyEnum>() {
        };
        System.out.println("constructor: " + container.enumType.getRawType());
        System.out.println("factory    : " + build(MyEnum.class).enumType.getRawType());
    }

    public static <E extends Enum<E>> Test<E> build(Class<E> type) {
        return new Test<E>() {
        };
    }
}

The above example outputs:

constructor: class Test$MyEnum
factory    : class java.lang.Enum

Why doesn't this work and can it be fixed?

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  • 3
    Again, type erasure. The type MyEnum inferred for your invocation of build does not propagate to inside the method implementation. Your anonymous class is parameterized with a type variable E. That's all that can be known about it at runtime. (And it's bounds.) – Sotirios Delimanolis Jun 27 '16 at 7:04
  • You could pass the class type of the type parameter into the constructor of Test and construct the TypeToken for enumType directly from that using TypeToken.of(cls). – clstrfsck Jun 27 '16 at 7:24
  • @SotiriosDelimanolis Feel free to post this as an answer (with a workaround) and I'll mark it as accepted. – Gili Jun 27 '16 at 14:32
1

Seeing as no one bothered converting their comment into a formal answer, I'll go ahead and do so:

As previously discussed, Java only retains information about type-parameters of generic superclasses. Since the type-parameter is associated with a method (as opposed to a superclass) the runtime value of <E> is not retained. Replacing the factory method with

public static Test<MyEnum> of() {
    return new Test<MyEnum>() {
    };
}

will result in the right value, but obviously this defeats the purpose of the factory method because we're forced to use a hard-coded enum type.

To recap, TypeToken won't work here. The only way to retain information about the type-parameter is to pass a Class<E> as follows:

public class Test<E extends Enum<E>> {

    private static enum MyEnum {
        FIRST,
        SECOND
    };

    private final Class<E> type;

    public Test(Class<E> type) {
        this.type = type;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test<MyEnum> container = new Test<>(MyEnum.class);
        System.out.println(container.type);
        System.out.println(of(MyEnum.class).type);
    }

    public static <E extends Enum<E>> Test<E> of(Class<E> type) {
        return new Test<>(type);
    }
}
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0

Depending on how the generated type should be used, another option is actually implement a ParameterizedType. Thats basically what the TypeToken.getType() would return.

    public static ParameterizedType parameterizedType(Class<?> rawType, Type... actualTypeArguments) {
    return new ParameterizedType() {
        @Override
        public Type[] getActualTypeArguments() {
            return actualTypeArguments;
        }

        @Override
        public Class<?> getRawType() {
            return rawType;
        }

        @Override
        public Type getOwnerType() {
            return null;
        }
    };
}
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  • Sorry, I don't understand. How does this fit in with the testcase in the question? Can you update the testcase to show up this approach fixes the output? – Gili Jun 29 '16 at 15:49
  • It doesnt fit the testcase entirely, depending on what you are actually trying to do it might not fit at all. It is an approach to dynamically(!) create a parameterizedtype. TypeTokens can only make static cases reifable. Things i have used this approach is using Jackson to dynamically deserialze stuff, or query for beans from cdi based on generic interfaces. – k5_ Jun 29 '16 at 17:05
  • Okay, please provide (or link to) a self-contained executable sample that demonstrates this in action. I am having a hard time understanding the code sniplet without this context. – Gili Jun 29 '16 at 20:09

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