type driver struct {
    variables map[string]string
}

var Drivers []driver

func main() {

    driver := driver{
        variables: make(map[string]string),
    }
    Drivers = append(Drivers, driver)

    driver.variables = make(map[string]string) // Commenting this line makes it work, too

    done := make(chan bool) 
    go driver.populate(done)

    <-done

    fmt.Print(Drivers[0].variables)
}

func (this *driver) populate(done chan bool) {
    time.Sleep(500 * time.Millisecond)
    this.variables["a"] = "b"
    done <- true
}

I expected:

map[a:b]

Actual result:

map[]

Playground

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is simple: you have a slice of drivers:

var Drivers []driver

Note that Drivers is a slice of some struct type, not a slice of pointers!

When you append something (or you assign a value to one of its elements):

Drivers = append(Drivers, driver)

That makes a copy of the value appended (or assigned)! So when you do this later:

driver.variables = make(map[string]string)

It will set a new map value to driver.variables, but that is distinct from the value stored in Drivers (more precisely at Drivers[0]).

Later you populate driver.variables, but you print Drivers[0].variables. They are 2 different struct values, with 2 different map values. Goroutines do not play a role here (they are properly synchronized so they shouldn't anyway).

Would you print driver.variables:

fmt.Print(driver.variables)

You would see (try it on the Go Playground):

map[a:b]

If you comment out this line:

driver.variables = make(map[string]string) // Commenting this line makes it work, too

It would work, but only because even though you have 2 struct values, they have the same map value (same map header pointing to the same map data structure).

You can also make it work if you call driver.populate() on the struct value Drivers[0] (and sticking to printing Drivers[0].variables):

go Drivers[0].populate(done)

// ...

fmt.Print(Drivers[0].variables)

Try this one on the Go Playground.

And you can also make it work if Drivers is a slice of pointers:

var Drivers []*driver

// ...

driver := &driver{
    variables: make(map[string]string),
}

Because driver and Driver[0] will be the same pointer (you will have only one struct value and one map value as the initial map is not accessible anymore). Try this on the Go Playground.

  • 4
    This is the correct answer: goroutines in this case are irrelevant: play.golang.org/p/Eh3gPbFWPL shows the problem with only the main goroutine; understanding that struct are copied, but pointers (and reference types, like map) are shared is what is causing the problem here. – val Jun 27 '16 at 11:46

The reason why using the goroutine version you are not getting an uninitialized map is that when the main function returns, the program exits: it does not wait for other (non-main) goroutines to complete. Please be aware the main function itself is a goroutine.

So even if you initialize the map using:

driver.variables = make(map[string]string)

it does not mean that you actually populate with values, you are only initialize a hash map data structure and returns a map value that points to it.

Map types are reference types, like pointers or slices, and so the value of m above is nil; it doesn't point to an initialized map. A nil map behaves like an empty map when reading, but attempts to write to a nil map will cause a runtime panic; don't do that. To initialize a map, use the built in make function.

In case you remove the go keyword first it will initialize the driver.variables map. But because it's running in the same thread (the main thread) and you put a time delay on the populate function first it will initialize the map, then populate it.

  • I don't understand. Doesn't the populate() goroutine run while the main goroutine does time.Sleep(1000ms)? – AndreKR Jun 27 '16 at 11:11
  • After Petr's suggestion I updated my question. I think your explanation doesn't apply anymore, but the behavior is still the same. – AndreKR Jun 27 '16 at 11:31
  • Yes, it's running, but driver.variables = make(map[string]string) will get reinitialized if you call the populate function on another goroutine. – Simo Endre Jun 27 '16 at 11:37

I'd better use channels instead of sleeps:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

type driver struct {
    variables map[string]string
}

var Drivers []driver

func main() {
    driver := driver{
        variables: make(map[string]string),
    }
    Drivers = append(Drivers, driver)

    done := make(chan bool)
    go driver.populate(done)
    <-done // wait for goroutine to complete

    fmt.Print(Drivers[0].variables)
}

func (this *driver) populate(done chan bool) {
    time.Sleep(500 * time.Millisecond)
    this.variables["a"] = "b"
    done <- true
}

Playground

  • Excellent idea. Your version still shows the same problem and eliminates all doubt about race conditions. I updated my question. – AndreKR Jun 27 '16 at 11:29
  • @AndreKR yes, indeed, I've just noticed that it's not related to goroutines. You use a slice of structs, not a slice of pointers. It works with slice of pointers: play.golang.org/p/R8Vkwh_J9H – Petr Shevtsov Jun 27 '16 at 11:50

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