1

In the documentation for the boost property tree there is an example of its proper use, given here or in the package in libs/property_tree/examples/debug_settings.cpp.

What I want to know is about the struct debug_settings line. Why make this a struct instead of a class? It even has two member functions, load(...) and save(...). I assume that the boost authors have a good reason for this, and that it has something to do with... efficiency somehow, even if a struct and a class are "technically" identical?

From the copyright year listed, I can guess that this is likely C++98, C++03, or C++0x, so the reasoning for using a struct instead of a class is at least from a pre-C++11 viewpoint.

// ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Copyright (C) 2002-2006 Marcin Kalicinski
//
// Distributed under the Boost Software License, Version 1.0. 
// (See accompanying file LICENSE_1_0.txt or copy at 
// http://www.boost.org/LICENSE_1_0.txt)
//
// For more information, see www.boost.org
// ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

//[debug_settings_includes
#include <boost/property_tree/ptree.hpp>
#include <boost/property_tree/xml_parser.hpp>
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <string>
#include <set>
#include <exception>
#include <iostream>
namespace pt = boost::property_tree;
//]
//[debug_settings_data
struct debug_settings
{
    std::string m_file;               // log filename
    int m_level;                      // debug level
    std::set<std::string> m_modules;  // modules where logging is enabled
    void load(const std::string &filename);
    void save(const std::string &filename);
};
//]
//[debug_settings_load
void debug_settings::load(const std::string &filename)
{
    // Create empty property tree object
    pt::ptree tree;

    // Parse the XML into the property tree.
    pt::read_xml(filename, tree);

    // Use the throwing version of get to find the debug filename.
    // If the path cannot be resolved, an exception is thrown.
    m_file = tree.get<std::string>("debug.filename");

    // Use the default-value version of get to find the debug level.
    // Note that the default value is used to deduce the target type.
    m_level = tree.get("debug.level", 0);

    // Use get_child to find the node containing the modules, and iterate over
    // its children. If the path cannot be resolved, get_child throws.
    // A C++11 for-range loop would also work.
    BOOST_FOREACH(pt::ptree::value_type &v, tree.get_child("debug.modules")) {
        // The data function is used to access the data stored in a node.
        m_modules.insert(v.second.data());
    }

}
//]
//[debug_settings_save
void debug_settings::save(const std::string &filename)
{
    // Create an empty property tree object.
    pt::ptree tree;

    // Put the simple values into the tree. The integer is automatically
    // converted to a string. Note that the "debug" node is automatically
    // created if it doesn't exist.
    tree.put("debug.filename", m_file);
    tree.put("debug.level", m_level);

    // Add all the modules. Unlike put, which overwrites existing nodes, add
    // adds a new node at the lowest level, so the "modules" node will have
    // multiple "module" children.
    BOOST_FOREACH(const std::string &name, m_modules)
        tree.add("debug.modules.module", name);

    // Write property tree to XML file
    pt::write_xml(filename, tree);
}
//]

int main()
{
    try
    {
        debug_settings ds;
        ds.load("debug_settings.xml");
        ds.save("debug_settings_out.xml");
        std::cout << "Success\n";
    }
    catch (std::exception &e)
    {
        std::cout << "Error: " << e.what() << "\n";
    }
    return 0;
}

I have looked at some previous posts on StackOverflow, but what I am really looking for is in this instance only. I have read through

My thoughts: To me this doesn't look like "Plain Old Data (POD)", because it has a member function and because it encapsulates class-based objects std::string and std::set. That string can change so I'm questioning "immutability". It has more than 1 data-type in it and it is likely larger than a 2 bytes. It has access loading and saving functionality which make it more than a simple structure. Boost is a C++ library, so it shouldn't expect that someone will be using it for C.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Holt, Tony Hinkle, Jackson, Rick Smith, user6263819 Jun 27 '16 at 15:35

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 6
    struct and class are equivalent in C++, the only difference is that by default struct attributes are public while class attributes are private. The choice is purely a matter of preference. – Holt Jun 27 '16 at 11:57
  • @Holt I know that they are "equivalent", but I thought that maybe the resulting machine code could vary sometimes, like a++ / ++a. Or if it was purely a style, what their reasoning was. – USERID_UNK Jun 27 '16 at 12:28
  • If they're equivalent except for the default access specifiers, why would machine code ever vary? Do you expect machine code to vary if you put a redundant public: before another public: in a struct/class? – Jonathan Wakely Jun 27 '16 at 12:30
  • As @JonathanWakely said, there is no difference in generated "code". As for the matter of style, the only person you can ask is the author of the code himself... I personally never use the class keyword in c++ (except when I am forced to by the standard... ) for style issue, habits, ..., nobody is going to tell you why I do it that way (I am not even sure I could). – Holt Jun 27 '16 at 12:38
  • 1
    Also note that some of the questions you linked are for C#, which is completely different from C++ and where there are difference between struct and class. – Holt Jun 27 '16 at 12:39
6

This class doesn't encapsulate any data; it simply aggregates it together. That, along with convenience functions, looks to be the whole point of the class.

5

They could do this:

class debug_settings
{
public:
    std::string m_file;               // log filename
    int m_level;                      // debug level
    std::set<std::string> m_modules;  // modules where logging is enabled
    void load(const std::string &filename);
    void save(const std::string &filename);
};

But they decided that they don't need a class if everything is public anyway.

As it was already said:

struct and class are equivalent in C++, the only difference is that by default struct attributes are public while class attributes are private.

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