23

I'm using SQL Server Management Studio and have the following schema in place:

CREATE TABLE tmp(
    id int NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1)PRIMARY KEY,
    toleranceRegion DECIMAL
)

Then I perform the following insertions:

INSERT INTO tmp VALUES(3.2); 
INSERT INTO tmp VALUES(5.678);
INSERT INTO tmp VALUES(1.95);

Expected output:

id  toleranceRegion
--  ---------------
1   3.2
2   5.678
3   1.95

Actual output:

id  toleranceRegion
--  ---------------
1   3
2   6
3   2

Why are the inserted toleranceRegion values being rounded to the nearest integer?

3
  • 2
    why arent you setting the precision and scale?
    – JamieD77
    Commented Jun 27, 2016 at 20:32
  • 2
    You did not define a scale/precision for your decimal. If you want 3 digits after the decimal you should define it as DECIMAL(9,3) which would give you 6 places before the decimal and a decimal of up to 3 places.
    – Igor
    Commented Jun 27, 2016 at 20:33
  • 2
    [Puts hand up] OK I'll admit to falling for this one. Though the answer does make complete sense I do find it a bit of a trap for the default scale (0) to not actually create (my idea of) a decimal in the first place. What is it about default setting ensuring you fall into the pit of success rather than the pit of failure? Commented Dec 13, 2018 at 10:34

4 Answers 4

27

You did not define a scale/precision for your decimal. If you want 3 digits after the decimal you should define it as DECIMAL(9,3) which would give you 6 places before the decimal and a decimal of up to 3 places. You need to analyze the expected data and based on what you expect specify the correct precision and scale for your column definition.

CREATE TABLE tmp(
    id int NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1)PRIMARY KEY,
    toleranceRegion DECIMAL(9,3)
)

See the Sql Server documentation for decimal here.

4

This is because you are not setting scale, which means that the system is using the default scale of zero:

s (scale) The number of decimal digits that will be stored to the right of the decimal point. This number is subtracted from p to determine the maximum number of digits to the left of the decimal point. The maximum number of decimal digits that can be stored to the right of the decimal point. Scale must be a value from 0 through p. Scale can be specified only if precision is specified. The default scale is 0. (emphasis added)

In other words, SQL Server stores zero digits to the right of decimal point.

3

Set your precision

Decimal(18,4)

This would be decimals

1

Here question is How did you define the precision of the DECIMAL column?

If it is DECIMAL(10, 2) it will have a total of 11 numbers of which 2 are decimal values (with 2 decimal rounding meaning that 10.215 is saved as 11.22 and 11.214 becomes 11.21).

If it is DECIMAL(10) it will not have any decimal values and be rounded to an integer.

In your question you defined toleranceRegion DECIMAL so it is rounded to next integer If you declare table like

CREATE TABLE tmp(
id int NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1)PRIMARY KEY,
toleranceRegion DECIMAL(10,3)

)

Then it will not rounded of and you will get the result as you want

INSERT INTO tmp VALUES(3.2); 
INSERT INTO tmp VALUES(5.678);
INSERT INTO tmp VALUES(1.95);

output:

id  toleranceRegion
--  ---------------
1   3.2
2   5.678
3   1.95

Note:- If you use FLOAT or DOUBLE PRECISION you don't have to specify the number of decimal values but it has its own flaws.

For more details you can click here

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