22

I am migrating a Java project from Ant to Gradle. I think the best solution is to use Gradle's multi-project support, but I cannot find a way to get rid of a circular dependency.

The original project was setup to have this layout:

- project/
  - common/
  - product-a/
  - product-b/

The relationship between common, product-a, and product-b is tricky. The common depends on product-a or product-b, depending on a configuration file. Likewise, product-a and product-b depend on common, regardless of the configuration property. product-a and product-b will never be built at the same time.

I thought a quick solution would be to use something like this in the project/build.gradle:

project(':product-a') {
    dependencies {
        compile project(':common')
    }
}

project(':product-b') {
    dependencies {
        compile project(':common')
    }
}

Next, I thought about getting a way to get this closer to working for just product-a. That led me to this:

project(':common') {
    dependencies {
        compile project(':product-a')
    }
}

This will throw an exception for having a circular dependency.

I've considered refactoring product-a and product-b by setting up interfaces of the classes expected by common and product-a/product-b or by using polymorphism, but before I move forward with either of those, is there a better way to accomplish this with Gradle? I'm not ready to get rid of this technical debt yet.

2 Answers 2

25

Removing a circular dependency cannot be resolved with build trickery. You're going to have to refactor your modules so there is no longer a circular dependency. From your module names, and with no other information, I would think you would want to extract the part of "common" that depends on "product-*" and put it into a new module.

1
1
project(':project-a') {
    dependencies {
        compile project(':project-b')
    }
}

project(':project-b') {
    dependencies {
        //circular dependency to :project-a
        compile project(':project-a')
    }


   compileJava {
       doLast {
           // NOTE: project-a needs :project-b classes to be included
           // in :project-a jar file hence the copy, mostly done if we need to  
           // to support different version of the same library
           // compile each version on a separate project
          copy {
               from "$buildDir/classes/java/main"
               include '**/*.class'
               into project(':project-a').file('build/classes/java/main')

     }
   }

 }
}

product-a --> build.gradle

/**
 * Do nothing during configuration stage by
 * registering a GradleBuild task
 * will be referenced in the task compileJava doLast{}
 */
tasks.register("copyProjectBClasses", GradleBuild) {
  //we'll invoke this later
  def taskList = new ArrayList<String>()
  taskList.add(":product-b:compileJava")
  logger.lifecycle "Task to execute $taskList..."
  setTasks(taskList)
}

// make sure :project-b classes are compiled first and copied to this project before 
// all classes are added to the jar, so we do it after :project-a compiled.
compileJava {
  doLast {
    synchronized(this) {
      // create temp file to avoid circular dependency
      def newFile = new File("$buildDir/ongoingcopy.tmp")
      if (!newFile.exists()) {
        newFile.createNewFile()
        GradleBuild buildCopyProjectBClasses = tasks.getByName("copyProjectBClasses")
        buildCopyProjectBClasses.build()
      }
      newFile.delete()
    }
  }
}

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