10

For example, I have a label on my page:

var label = new Label
{
    Text = "Some text here.",
    LineBreakMode = LineBreakMode.WordWrap,
    FontSize = Device.GetNamedSize(NamedSize.Large, typeof(Label))
};

How do I make this label's font size increase (or decrease) depending on the user's accessibility settings for font sizes? For example, in iOS you can set the Font Size for your device under Settings > General > Accessibility > Larger Text. I believe that Apple calls this "Dynamic Text" and is almost a requirement for your app to support.

The same applies for other controls in my app (buttons, entrys, etc).

I have tried this setting on my iPhone and it does not appear to be changing all things in my app. There are a few things like TableView section headers and list view cells that are changing, but things like my standard Labels and Entrys are not.

  • Did you try the setting on your phone? Doesn't it just work? – Gerald Versluis Jun 28 '16 at 3:58
  • I have turned on the settings and it did not work. Let me update my question a bit. – kspearrin Jun 28 '16 at 3:58
14

You would need to supply the UIFont returned from preferredFontWithTextStyle (C# = UIFont.PreferredFontForTextStyle) as your usage context of a label, button, entry, etc... would not be known to Xamarin.Forms.

So what I did for one client was subclass the base renderers and view elements and add an iOS-only property to those elements so they could define the context of how that control is begin used in the UI and thus when rendered by iOS these controls will be subject to Dynamic Text sizing.

There are six Dynamic font types defined in iOS 9:

  • UICTFontTextStyleBody
  • UICTFontTextStyleCaption1
  • UICTFontTextStyleCaption2
  • UICTFontTextStyleFootnote
  • UICTFontTextStyleHeadline
  • UICTFontTextStyleSubhead

Note: Xamarin.iOS does not have constants/enum defined for these like Swift does (ObjC does not define these either), so they are passed as a NSString, see example below.

Example Renderer:

Sets UICTFontTextStyleBody for a label subclass called BodyLabel:

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(BodyLabel), typeof(iOSLabelBodyRenderer))]
namespace Foobar.iOS
{
    public class iOSLabelBodyRenderer : LabelRenderer
    {
        public iOSLabelBodyRenderer() { }

        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<Label> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);
            if (Control != null)
                Control.Font = UIFont.GetPreferredFontForTextStyle(new NSString("UICTFontTextStyleBody"));
        }
    }
}

Results in:

enter image description here

enter image description here

Note: Technically you should also implement UIContentSizeCategoryDidChangeNotification notifications so you resize/invalidate your controls when the user changes the dynamic font size.

  • Thanks. Let me play with this a bit and see what I can come up with. Will update later. – kspearrin Jun 28 '16 at 12:12
7

Using the info in the answer provided @SushiHangover, I was able to implement the following renderer strategy for iOS:

Create a renderer for each control that you want to support dynamic text on. In my case, this included Labels, Buttons, and Entrys. The renderers assign the Control.Font to a UIFontDescriptor with the PointSize percentage adjusted based on the NamedSize assigned to the Xamarin Forms control.

Example:

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(Button), typeof(CustomButtonRenderer))]
namespace iOS.Controls
{
    public class CustomButtonRenderer : ButtonRenderer
    {
        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<Button> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);

            var view = e.NewElement as Button;
            if(Control != null && view != null)
            {
                var descriptor = UIFontDescriptor.PreferredBody;
                var pointSize = descriptor.PointSize;

                var size = view.FontSize;
                if(size == Device.GetNamedSize(NamedSize.Large, typeof(Button)))
                {
                    pointSize *= 1.4f;
                }
                else if(size == Device.GetNamedSize(NamedSize.Small, typeof(Button)))
                {
                    pointSize *= .8f;
                }
                else if(size == Device.GetNamedSize(NamedSize.Micro, typeof(Button)))
                {
                    pointSize *= .6f;
                }

                Control.Font = UIFont.FromDescriptor(descriptor, pointSize);
            }
        }
    }
}

You could even dynamically support fixed font sizes this way by taking their percentage value based on the base NamedSize.Default size.

Example:

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(Button), typeof(CustomButtonRenderer))]
namespace iOS.Controls
{
    public class CustomButtonRenderer : ButtonRenderer
    {
        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<Button> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);

            var view = e.NewElement as Button;
            if(Control != null && view != null)
            {
                var descriptor = UIFontDescriptor.PreferredBody;
                var percent = view.FontSize / Device.GetNamedSize(NamedSize.Default, typeof(Button));

                Control.Font = UIFont.FromDescriptor(descriptor, percent * descriptor.PointSize);
            }
        }
    }
}

For reference, full implementation examples can be found in this GitHub project.

  • This is a very interesting approach. It respect the end user choice in regards of its own text size and bring in the possibility to get a scale of custom proportions. I have to say thank you. I'm new, or almost new to Xamarin Forms and this kind of integration is what i wanted exactly. I'm a pixel era propramer and seriously simple things are sometime very hard to realize without such help of yours! – Brainarts Jun 26 '20 at 16:40
2

For iOS I believe things have changed in Xamarin.Forms since the earlier answers were provided. If a NamedSize value is assigned to the FontSize property of a text element, the text now gets scaled up and down with the value set via the iOS "Larger Text" setting.

For example, this would result in accessible, scalable text:

<Label
    FontSize="Large"
    LineBreakMode="WordWrap"
    Text="Some text here." />
  • 2
    Might just add here that 'Large' isn't one of the auto-adjusting font sizes. Only Title, Subtitle, Header, Body and Caption are mapped to the iOS 'magic' fonts (from the PR you linked). The rest are mapped to (admittedly scaling, just not automatic) fixed point sizes. – Red Nightingale May 28 '20 at 4:41
  • That's a good observation: looking at the code prior to that PR the other sizes (inc. Large) do scale as you've said, and are mapped by Xamarin in the same way as the sizes you've mentioned. I'm not aware of there's any other behavioural differences between these 2 sets of named fonts? – rogersillito May 30 '20 at 19:00
  • I'd love to know if you get the 'without closing the app' font size change when the accessibility font size is increased. I've looked through the Xamarin.Forms repo and from my understanding it will never work in that way. It'll only change when the view is reloaded/refreshed or the app is closed and restarted? – Red Nightingale May 31 '20 at 6:31
  • from experience using this, an app restart is definitely required. – rogersillito Jun 1 '20 at 18:20

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