Are there any performance benchmarks for Mono compared to say Java in GNU/Linux?

Have you ever tested Mono's performance?

  • 3
    Would anyone like to revisit this now that C# 4.0 is out? – user482594 Oct 29 '11 at 0:28
  • @user482594 - I provided an up-to-date link in my answer that should stay current: stackoverflow.com/a/9138207/332026 – Justin Feb 4 '12 at 3:40
  • 1
    @user482594 - The benchmarks game does show Mono 2.10.9, which does provide C# 4.0 -- but that doesn't mean that C# programs have been re-written to use C# 4.0 features. – igouy Sep 28 '12 at 19:35
up vote 12 down vote accepted

There is an interesting post from Miguel on this.

"Alvaro points out that in the Language Shootout Benchmark Mono comes in 18th place compared to Java's 10th place.

We know that Sun's proprietary Java edition (not the open source one, as that one is nowhere to be found yet) is faster than Mono, but I was surprised that we were so far behind. So I looked at the comparison between Java6 and Mono."

Comparison - Java and Mono http://tirania.org/pictures/javavsmono.png

See Details Here

The latest version of this shoot-out can be found here.

In a nutshell, compared to Java, Mono uses much less memory and runs a little slower.

To keep things in perspective, they both run about the same speed in the grand scheme of things. They both run these tests orders of magnitude faster than languages like Ruby, LUA, Python, PHP, and Perl. They are both in the same ball-park as Pascal, OCaml, Haskell, and LISP which makes them about half as fast as C and C++. Click here for more detail.

To nitpick, we should be clear that our answers here compare Java and Mono C#. Both Mono and the JVM are environments targeted by various languages and the choice of language matters. For example, if we compare F# on Mono with Clojure on the JVM we get totally different results and suddenly "Mono" is "faster".

While these comparisons are interesting and informative, you have to take them with a grain of salt. First, although some people do, most people writing Java and C# code are not running nothing but numerical algorithms in tight loops. Second, in some of these languages, the tested algorithms may just be calling into libraries that are written in C and not in the target language at all. Finally, other benchmarks (and implementations) would likely yield different results.

Still, it is reasonable to infer that Go is much faster than Ruby, C++ is faster than Go, and both Java and C# perform pretty reasonably given how productive they are (IMHO).

amazedsaint > There is an interesting post from Miguel on this.

That chart is way out of date!

Here's the current Mono C# 4.0 comparison

My benchmark (using complex mathematical problems and memory manipulation (with raw strings)):

MonoDevelop Windows (running on console using .net 3.5): Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 535 Realizando operações com strings longas... 2.038 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 530 Realizando operações com strings longas... 1.962 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 530 Realizando operações com strings longas... 1.963

Using mono.exe on Windows: Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 6.875 Realizando operações com strings longas... 6.206 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 6.840 Realizando operações com strings longas... 6.114 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 6.857 Realizando operações com strings longas... 6.116

Using mono on Linux Ubuntu: Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 5,934 Realizando operações com strings longas... 6,915 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 6,034 Realizando operações com strings longas... 7,489 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 5,740 Realizando operações com strings longas... 6,731

Same source code, but on Visual Studio 2008: Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 588 Realizando operações com strings longas... 1.289 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 566 Realizando operações com strings longas... 1.320 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 702 Realizando operações com strings longas... 1.393

VS 2008 generated exe with NGEN (native executable): Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 567 Realizando operações com strings longas... 1.255 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 563 Realizando operações com strings longas... 1.269 Realizando cálculos em 1.000.000 itens... 562 Realizando operações com strings longas... 1.263

In those tests, mono is 10x slower than .net 3.5 SP 1 =(

  • 1
    Post your benchmark code on mono-devel-list or put a link here so we can see what's up with that code. – lupus Feb 27 '10 at 10:22

C++, C# (Mono), C and Vala: http://jpaflacerda.wordpress.com/2011/11/08/vala-benchmarking/

Many languages: http://attractivechaos.github.com/plb/

Conclusion: Mono evolved alot, but it is still slow when compared with other languages available. I got interested in Vala, which has almost the same syntax of C# but is faster than plain C in some cases.

  • Clearly Vala cannot be "faster" than C as it compiles to C an intermediate language. Vala is really just a C code generator. This is not an insult though. I think that Vala is awesome. – Justin Feb 4 '12 at 1:55
  • Yes, you are correct. It will never be "faster than C", but it might be faster than usual C because it can translate to very well optimized C code and know exactly which flags should be in the compiler to get the best performance (I'm not saying it already does all this, but it might). Also, the benchmark results are there. And yes, Vala is awesome :) – Léo Feb 6 '12 at 13:48

Most of the benchmarks are based on heavy computation of tight loops. Time start counting just before the loop and stop just after. If your application is doing heavy data processing then avoid both C# and Java, simply go for C/C++.

It's more likely that your application will be server side. That it will have to accept queries, fetch data and send it back. In such scenario the raw speed of generated code is not relevant compared to other parameters.

You'd better look at how efficient is the underlying framework, how fast is the initialization phase preceding execution of your the code, how easy it is to implement efficient technologies like non blocking I/O, how well is memory released and process recycled after code execution. How easy is it to deploy code, make it scale up...

The human parameter is even more important than all that. A badly written Java is slower than good C# and vice versa. So you have to check your developers. Wich language do they master, wich tool do they like better ? Are they VS/resharper addicts or can they use Java IDE ? The time spend in learning new language or IDE will not be spent on writing better, more optimized code.

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