4

I'm currently going through the Euler Project. I've started using JavaScript and I've switched to Python yesterday, as I got stuck in a problem that seemed to complex to solve with Javascript but easily solved in Python, and so I've decided to start from the first problem again in python.

I'm at problem 5 which asks me to find the smallest positive number that is evenly divisible by all of the numbers from 1 to 20.

I know how to solve it with paper and pencil and I've already solved using programming, but in a search for optimising it I crossed this solution in the forum of the Euler Project.

It seems elegant and it is fairly fast, ridiculous fast compared to mine, as it takes about 2 seconds to solve the same problem for numbers 1 to 1000, where mine takes several minutes.

I've tried to understand it, but I'm still having difficulty to grasp what it really is doing. Here it is:

i = 1
for k in (range(1, 21)):
    if i % k > 0:
        for j in range(1, 21):
            if (i*j) % k == 0:
                i *= j
                break
print i

It was originally posted by an user named lassevk

  • what you are not getting is probably the math and not the code though, right ? – Ev. Kounis Jun 28 '16 at 11:09
  • Basically that code is computing the least common multiple of the numbers from 1 to 20. – Bakuriu Jun 28 '16 at 11:10
  • the inner loop computes factorials and the outer one checks their divisibility – Ev. Kounis Jun 28 '16 at 11:12
  • Yes, sorry, it's the math that's going on there I'm failing to grasp. As the code is fairly simple. – JalxP Jun 28 '16 at 11:15
  • @JalxP: FWIW, that algorithm is a bit convoluted. And it's not particularly efficient, either. – PM 2Ring Jun 28 '16 at 12:08
6

That code is computing the least common multiple of the numbers from 1 to 20 (or whichever other range you use).

It starts from 1, then for each number k in that range it checks if k is a factor of i, and if not (i.e. when i % k > 0) it adds that number as a factor.

However doing i *= k does not produce the least common multiple, because for example when you have i = 2 and k = 6 it's enough to multiply i by 3 to have i % 6 == 0, so the inner loop finds the least number j such that i*j has k as a factor.

In the end every number k in the range is such that i % k == 0 and we always added the minimal factors in order to do so, thus we computed the least common multiple.


Maybe showing exactly how the values change can help understanding the process:

i = 1
k = 1
i % k == 0  -> next loop

i = 1
k = 2
i % k == 1 > 0
   j = 1
   if (i*j) % k == 1 -> next inner loop
   j = 2
   if (i*j) % k == 0
      i *= j
i = 2
k = 3
i % k == 2 > 0
    j = 1
    if (i*j) % k == 2 -> next inner loop
    j = 2
    if (i*j) % k == 4 % 3 == 1 -> next inner loop
    j = 3
    if (i*j) % k == 6 % 3 == 0
        i *= j
i = 6
k = 4
i % k == 2 > 0
    j = 1
    if (i*j) % k == 6 % k == 2 -> next inner loop
    j = 2
    if (i*j) % k == 12 % k == 0
        i *= j
i = 12
k = 5
i % k == 2 > 0
    j = 1
    if (i*j) % k == 12 % k == 2 -> next inner loop
    j = 2
    if (i*j) % k == 24 % k == 4 -> next inner loop
    j = 3
    if (i*j) % k == 36 % k == 1 -> next inner loop
    j = 4
    if (i*j) % k == 48 % k == 3 -> next inner loop
    j = 5
    if (i*j) % k == 60 %k == 0
       i *= j
i = 60
...

You can immediately notice a few things:

  • The range(1, 21) can be safely changed to range(2, 21) since the 1s never do anything
  • Everytime k is a prime number the inner loop ends when j=k and will end up in i *= k. That's expected since when k is a prime it has no factors and so there's no option for a smaller number j that would make i a multiple of k.
  • In other casesthe number i is multiplied by a number j < k so that all factors of k are now in i.
  • Hi Bakuriu! Your answer made me understand it very well! I still needed to grab a pen and paper to really get it, but you made it far more easy to me! I've really appreciated your help! The edit where you included real examples was the cherry on top of the cake! I'm very grateful, for real mate! Thank you – JalxP Jun 28 '16 at 11:46
3

Bakuriu has answered your question by explaining lassevk's "factorial" algorithm. However, there's a simpler way to do this which is much faster for larger inputs.

Let num be the highest number in the sequence. So for your example num = 20.

Simply multiply all the numbers from 2 to num together and at each step divide by the GCD (Greatest Common Denominator) of the current multiplier and the current product.

In this code, I initialize the product to num, just to make the loop look a bit nicer.

num = 20

p = num
for i in range(2, num):
    # Compute GCD(p, i) using Euclid's algorithm
    # When the loop ends, a is the GCD
    a, b = p, i
    while b:
        a, b = b, a % b
    p *= i // a

print(p)

output

232792560

For small values of num this algorithm takes about the same time as lassevk's algorithm. But when num = 1000 it's about 4 times faster, and when num = 2000 it's about 14 times faster.


As Bakuriu mentions in the comments, the fractions module provides a gcd function. This makes the code somewhat shorter, but it doesn't provide a speedup in my tests.

from fractions import gcd

num = 20

p = num
for i in range(2, num):
    p *= i // gcd(p, i)

print(p)

Here's some Python 2 / Python 3 code that does actual timeit tests comparing the 2 variations of my algorithm. On Python 2.6.6, the version using fractions.gcd is about 10% slower, but on Python 3.6 it can be 5 to 10 times slower! Both tests were conducted on an old 2GHz machine running a Debian-derived Linux.

''' Test the speed of calculating the Least Common Multiple 
    via an inline implementation of Euclid's GCD algorithm
    vs the gcd function from the fractions module

    See http://stackoverflow.com/q/38074440/4014959

    Written by PM 2Ring 2016.06.28
'''

from timeit import Timer
from fractions import gcd

def lcm0(num):
    p = num
    for i in range(2, num):
        a, b = p, i
        while b:
            a, b = b, a % b
        p *= i // a
    return p

def lcm1(num, gcd=gcd):
    p = num
    for i in range(2, num):
        p *= i // gcd(p, i)
    return p

funcs = (lcm0, lcm1)

def time_test(loops, reps):
    ''' Print timing stats for all the functions '''
    for func in funcs:
        fname = func.__name__
        setup = 'from __main__ import num,' + fname
        cmd = fname + '(num)'
        t = Timer(cmd, setup)
        r = t.repeat(reps, loops)
        r.sort()
        print('{0}: {1}'.format(fname, r))

num = 5
loops = 8192
reps = 5
for _ in range(10):
    print('\nnum={0}, loops={1}'.format(num, loops))
    time_test(loops, reps)
    num *= 2
    loops //= 2

Python 2.6 output

num=5, loops=8192
lcm0: [0.055649995803833008, 0.057304859161376953, 0.057752132415771484, 0.060063838958740234, 0.064462900161743164]
lcm1: [0.067559003829956055, 0.068048954010009766, 0.068253040313720703, 0.069074153900146484, 0.084647893905639648]

num=10, loops=4096
lcm0: [0.058645963668823242, 0.059965133666992188, 0.060016870498657227, 0.060331821441650391, 0.067235946655273438]
lcm1: [0.072937965393066406, 0.074002981185913086, 0.074270963668823242, 0.074965953826904297, 0.080986976623535156]

num=20, loops=2048
lcm0: [0.063373088836669922, 0.063961029052734375, 0.064354896545410156, 0.071543216705322266, 0.10234284400939941]
lcm1: [0.079973936080932617, 0.080717802047729492, 0.082272052764892578, 0.086506843566894531, 0.11265397071838379]

num=40, loops=1024
lcm0: [0.077324151992797852, 0.077867984771728516, 0.07857513427734375, 0.087296962738037109, 0.10289192199707031]
lcm1: [0.095077037811279297, 0.095172882080078125, 0.095523834228515625, 0.095964193344116211, 0.10543298721313477]

num=80, loops=512
lcm0: [0.09699702262878418, 0.097161054611206055, 0.09722590446472168, 0.099267005920410156, 0.10546517372131348]
lcm1: [0.1151740550994873, 0.11548399925231934, 0.11627888679504395, 0.11672496795654297, 0.12607502937316895]

num=160, loops=256
lcm0: [0.10686612129211426, 0.10825586318969727, 0.10832309722900391, 0.11523914337158203, 0.11636996269226074]
lcm1: [0.12528896331787109, 0.12630200386047363, 0.12688708305358887, 0.12690496444702148, 0.13400888442993164]

num=320, loops=128
lcm0: [0.12498903274536133, 0.12538790702819824, 0.12554287910461426, 0.12600493431091309, 0.13396120071411133]
lcm1: [0.14431190490722656, 0.14435195922851562, 0.15340209007263184, 0.15408897399902344, 0.159912109375]

num=640, loops=64
lcm0: [0.15442395210266113, 0.15479183197021484, 0.15657520294189453, 0.16451501846313477, 0.16749906539916992]
lcm1: [0.17400288581848145, 0.17454099655151367, 0.18450593948364258, 0.18503093719482422, 0.19588208198547363]

num=1280, loops=32
lcm0: [0.21137905120849609, 0.21206808090209961, 0.21211409568786621, 0.21935296058654785, 0.22051215171813965]
lcm1: [0.23439598083496094, 0.23578977584838867, 0.23717594146728516, 0.24761080741882324, 0.2488548755645752]

num=2560, loops=16
lcm0: [0.34246706962585449, 0.34283804893493652, 0.35072207450866699, 0.35794901847839355, 0.38117814064025879]
lcm1: [0.3587038516998291, 0.36004209518432617, 0.36267900466918945, 0.36284589767456055, 0.37285304069519043]

Python 3.6 output

num=5, loops=8192
lcm0: [0.0527388129994506, 0.05321520800134749, 0.05394392299785977, 0.0540059859995381, 0.06133090399816865]
lcm1: [0.45663526299904333, 0.4585357750002004, 0.45960231899880455, 0.4768777699973725, 0.48710195899911923]

num=10, loops=4096
lcm0: [0.05494695199740818, 0.057305197002278874, 0.058495635999861406, 0.07243769099659403, 0.07494244600093225]
lcm1: [0.5807856120009092, 0.5809524680007598, 0.5971023489983054, 0.6006399979996786, 0.6021203519994742]

num=20, loops=2048
lcm0: [0.06225249999988591, 0.06330173400056083, 0.06348088900267612, 0.0639248730003601, 0.07240132099832408]
lcm1: [0.6462642230035271, 0.6486189150018618, 0.6605903060008131, 0.6669839690002846, 0.7464891349991376]

num=40, loops=1024
lcm0: [0.06812337999872398, 0.06989315700047882, 0.07142737200047122, 0.07237963000079617, 0.07640906400047243]
lcm1: [0.6938937240011, 0.7021358079982747, 0.7238045579979371, 0.7265497620028327, 0.7266306150013406]

num=80, loops=512
lcm0: [0.07672808099960093, 0.07784233300117194, 0.07959756200216361, 0.08742279999933089, 0.09116945599816972]
lcm1: [0.7249167879999732, 0.7272519250000187, 0.7329213439988962, 0.7570086350024212, 0.75942590500199]

num=160, loops=256
lcm0: [0.08417846500015003, 0.08528995099914027, 0.0856771619983192, 0.08571110499906354, 0.09348897000018042]
lcm1: [0.7382230039984279, 0.7425414600002114, 0.7439042109981528, 0.7505959240006632, 0.756812355000875]

num=320, loops=128
lcm0: [0.10246147399811889, 0.10322481399998651, 0.10324400399986189, 0.10347093499876792, 0.11325025699989055]
lcm1: [0.7649764790003246, 0.7903363080004056, 0.7931463940003596, 0.8012050910001562, 0.8284494129984523]

num=640, loops=64
lcm0: [0.13264304200129118, 0.13345745100014028, 0.13389246199949412, 0.14023518899921328, 0.15422578799916664]
lcm1: [0.8085992009982874, 0.8125102049998532, 0.8179558970005019, 0.8299506059993291, 0.9141929620018345]

num=1280, loops=32
lcm0: [0.19097876199884922, 0.19147844200051622, 0.19308012399778818, 0.19317538399991463, 0.20103917100277613]
lcm1: [0.8671656119986437, 0.8713741569990816, 0.8904907689975516, 0.9020749549999891, 0.9131527989993629]

num=2560, loops=16
lcm0: [0.3099351109995041, 0.31015214799845126, 0.3101941059976525, 0.32628724800088094, 0.3492128660000162]
lcm1: [0.9883516860027157, 0.988955139000609, 0.9965159560015309, 1.0160803129983833, 1.0170008439999947]
  • Note: the fractions module already provides a gcd function. – Bakuriu Jun 28 '16 at 12:28
  • @Bakuriu: Good point. And I assume it's written in C, so it'll run much faster than my Python version... but I just did a quick test with num=2000 and it's actually slower on my machine, running Python 3.6. Butthat was a shell time test, not a Python timeit test. – PM 2Ring Jun 28 '16 at 12:34
  • @Bakuriu I've added some timeit tests: it's even worse than I first thought. – PM 2Ring Jun 28 '16 at 13:43
  • AFAIK fractions is a pure-python module, so the gcd function is mostly exactly the code you have written. Obviously function calls themselves are relatively expensive, so I'm not surprised that the same code with a bunch of extra function calls becomes a little bit slower. However I believe that the simplicity and readability of the code using an external function is worth the small slow down. Regarding the big difference in python3.6 I don't know. There may be some performance regression somewhere. – Bakuriu Jun 28 '16 at 13:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.