6

This question already has an answer here:

I want to make a function that adds a specific word in front of every string in the array. At the end I want the array changed. I have this code:

def make_great(magicians):
    """Change magicians"""
    for magician in magicians:
        magician = "the Great" + magician


magicians = ["hudini", "angel", "teller", "anderson", "copperfield"]
make_great(magicians)
print(magicians)

This code doesn't change the array. How can I make my function work?

marked as duplicate by Bhargav Rao python Jun 28 '16 at 19:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

12

You can use enumerate to loop over the list with both the index and the value, then use the index to change the value directly into the list:

def make_great(magicians):
    for index, magician in enumerate(magicians):
        magicians[index] = "the Great " + magician
4

enumerate would be the best thing to do in this case, then modify the value at each index in the array.

for i, magician in enumerate(magicians):
    magicians[i] = "the Great " + magician
  • Both you and @julienc have great answers although you should explain why the answer is what it is – Li357 Jun 28 '16 at 19:16
4

When you use a for-each loop:

def make_great(magicians):    
    for magician in magicians:
        magician = "The Great" + magician

you're actually creating a new string magician; so modifying it won't modify the original array as you found.

Instead, iterate over the items in the array:

def make_great(magicians):    
    for i in range(len(magicians)):
        magicians[i] = "The Great" + magicians[i]

Or use an enumerator as proposed above. See: How to modify list entries during for loop?

1

You can do this with a little Python magic combining lambda and map together

>>> magicians = ['hudini', 'angel', 'teller', 'anderson', 'copperfield']
>>> map(lambda el:'pre_'+el,magicians)
['pre_hudini', 'pre_angel', 'pre_teller', 'pre_anderson', 'pre_copperfield']

Try it out here

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