0
struct Vec
{
    double x, y, z;
};

Vec vec;
vec.x = 1.0;
vec.y = 2.0;
vec.z = 3.0;
double res = (&vec.x)[2];    // (&vec.x)[2] should be equal to vec.z

Value of variable res should be equal to 3. But when I turn the optimizations on, the compiler reorders the instructions incorrectly and res contains some rubbish. Some possible reordering examples:

vec.x = 1.0;
vec.y = 2.0;
vec.z = 3.0;
res = (&vec.x)[2];    // correct value

vec.x = 1.0;
vec.y = 2.0;
res = (&vec.x)[2];    // incorrect value
vec.z = 3.0;

vec.x = 1.0;
res = (&vec.x)[2];    // incorrect value
vec.y = 2.0;
vec.z = 3.0;

Is this a bug in compiler? Or is it not allowed to access struct data members like this?

EDIT:

I have just realised that the previous code actually works, sorry for that. But this does not work:

Vec vec;
vec.x = 1.0;
vec.y = 2.0;
vec.z = 3.0;
double res = (&vec.x)[i];    // (&vec.x)[i] should be equal to vec.z when i == 2

When the variable i is not know at compile time, compiler reorders the instructions incorrectly.

  • 3
    @BatCoder: If it's undefined behavior, it doesn't matter if you can reproduce it or not. – Benjamin Lindley Jun 29 '16 at 3:06
  • Javers, what is the meaning of (&vec.x)[2], how do you understand this? – osgx Jun 29 '16 at 3:14
  • (&vec.x)[2] takes address of vec.x, adds 2 and dereferences it. It should return the value of vec.z – Javers Kulpa Jun 29 '16 at 3:29
  • If you want array-like behavior, you should overload the subscript operator of your struct (i.e. operator[]) rather than trying to use pointer arithmetic in a way that it can't legally be used. See: learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/98-overloading-the-subscript-operator – Jeremy Friesner Jun 29 '16 at 3:29
  • Original code uses operator[] which does the same thing -- it returns (&x)[i] – Javers Kulpa Jun 29 '16 at 3:35
21
+50

You're invoking undefined behavior. (&vec.x)[2] is equivilant to (&vec.x) + 2, and the standard (§[expr.add]/4) has the following to say about pointer addition (emphasis mine):

When an expression that has integral type is added to or subtracted from a pointer, the result has the type of the pointer operand. If the pointer operand points to an element of an array object84, and the array is large enough, the result points to an element offset from the original element such that the difference of the subscripts of the resulting and original array elements equals the integral expression. In other words, if the expression P points to the i-th element of an array object, the expressions (P)+N (equivalently, N+(P)) and (P)-N (where N has the value n) point to, respectively, the i + n-th and i − n-th elements of the array object, provided they exist. Moreover, if the expression P points to the last element of an array object, the expression (P)+1 points one past the last element of the array object, and if the expression Q points one past the last element of an array object, the expression (Q)-1 points to the last element of the array object. If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined.

See also note 84 referenced above:

84) An object that is not an array element is considered to belong to a single-element array for this purpose; see 5.3.1.

Since vec.x is not an array, it is considered to be an element of a single-element array. Thus vec.x and vec.z are not elements of the same array, and the behavior is undefined.

2

Apart from undefined behavior, note that C++ is not forced to allocate these next to each other. If you want to reference them both by index and name, I suggest doing the other way:

struct Vec
{
    double elems[3];
    double& x;
    double& y;
    double& z;

    Vec()
    : x( elems[0] ), y( elems[1] ), z( elems[2] )
    {
    }
};

If you can't afford the possible (but not necessary) extra space per object, you might as well declare x, y, z as functions returning reference.

0

I have eventually found a solution which prevents instruction reordering and does not increase size of the Vec struct:

struct Vec
{
    union
    {
        struct
        {
            double x, y, z;
        };
        double data[3];
    };
};

Vec vec;
vec.x = 1.0;
vec.y = 2.0;
vec.z = 3.0;
double res = vec.data[i];

Thank you for your answers.

  • Is this guaranteed to work? or is it compiler specific behaviour? Did you test with other compilers? – will Jul 12 '16 at 21:56
  • That's still UB, twice so. – lorro Jul 13 '16 at 17:30
  • sizeof(Vec) == 24. The union shares the same memory for x and data[0], y and data[1], z and data[2]. – Javers Kulpa Jul 13 '16 at 23:10

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