5

If I define an enum like so:

enum Foo : bool { Left = false, Right = true };

then try to construct one from a boolean like so:

int main (int ac, const char **av) {
    Foo foo ( ac > 1 );
    cout << boolalpha << bool(foo) << endl;
    return 0;
}

it fails, but works with an extra constructor like so:

Foo foo ( Foo( ac > 1 ) );

Why is this? I thought Foo foo (...) was an explicit constructor call?

  • (orthogonal) Suggestion: use enum class Foo and static_cast<Foo>(). – lorro Jun 29 '16 at 10:01
  • In Foo foo( Foo( ac > 1 ) ), the second Foo is in fact a cast. – Jarod42 Jun 29 '16 at 10:09
  • 1
    I guess Foo( ac > 1 ) is typecasting result of (ac > 1) to Foo. And Foo foo ( Foo( ac > 1 ) ); involves calling byfefault copy constructor of Foo. – sameerkn Jun 29 '16 at 10:09
  • I guess that answers the question :) thankyou both (and thankyou for the suggestion, although I prefer constructor syntax for the conversion; I guess actually I would like the conversion to be implicit). – Will Crawford Jun 29 '16 at 10:13
0

Foo foo ( ac > 1 ); That's a case of the C++ most vexing parse. It's a function declaration that does nothing.

4

I don't think you can do this:

Foo foo ( ac > 1 );

Suppose you define Foo enum as:

enum Foo : bool { Left = false };

What would happen if you called:

Foo foo(true);

You don't have appropriate enum value for what you want to initialize with.

  • That's not really answering the question per se, although it's a valid caveat to casting involving enums in most cases. – Will Crawford Jun 29 '16 at 11:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.