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I implemented a lock-free queue based on the algorithm specified in Maged M. Michael and Michael L. Scott work Simple, Fast, and Practical Non-Blocking and Blocking Concurrent Queue Algorithms (for the algorithm, jump to page 4)

I used atomic operation on shared_ptr such as std::atomic_load_explicit etc.

when using the queue in one thread only, everything is fine, but when using it from different thread, I get a stack overflow exception.

I could not trace the source of the problem unfortunately. it seems that when one shared_ptr is getting out of scope, it decrements the number of references on the next ConcurrentQueueNode and it causes an infinite recursion, but I can't see why..

the Code:

the Queue node:

template<class T>
struct ConcurrentQueueNode {
    T m_Data;
    std::shared_ptr<ConcurrentQueueNode> m_Next;

    template<class ... Args>
    ConcurrentQueueNode(Args&& ... args) :
        m_Data(std::forward<Args>(args)...) {}

    std::shared_ptr<ConcurrentQueueNode>& getNext() {
        return m_Next;
    }

    T getValue() {
        return std::move(m_Data);
    }

};

The concurrent queue (note: not for the faint hearted):

template<class T>
class ConcurrentQueue {
    std::shared_ptr<ConcurrentQueueNode<T>> m_Head, m_Tail;

public:

ConcurrentQueue(){
    m_Head = m_Tail = std::make_shared<ConcurrentQueueNode<T>>();
}

template<class ... Args>
void push(Args&& ... args) {
    auto node = std::make_shared<ConcurrentQueueNode<T>>(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    std::shared_ptr<ConcurrentQueueNode<T>> tail;

    for (;;) {
        tail = std::atomic_load_explicit(&m_Tail, std::memory_order_acquire);
        std::shared_ptr<ConcurrentQueueNode<T>> next = 
            std::atomic_load_explicit(&tail->getNext(),std::memory_order_acquire);

        if (tail == std::atomic_load_explicit(&m_Tail, std::memory_order_acquire)) {
            if (next.get() == nullptr) {
                auto currentNext = std::atomic_load_explicit(&m_Tail, std::memory_order_acquire)->getNext();
                auto res = std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak(&tail->getNext(), &next, node);
                if (res) {
                    break;
                }
            }
            else {
                std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak(&m_Tail, &tail, next);
            }
        }
    }

    std::atomic_compare_exchange_strong(&m_Tail, &tail, node);
}

bool tryPop(T& dest) {
    std::shared_ptr<ConcurrentQueueNode<T>> head;
    for (;;) {
        head = std::atomic_load_explicit(&m_Head, std::memory_order_acquire);
        auto tail = std::atomic_load_explicit(&m_Tail,std::memory_order_acquire);
        auto next = std::atomic_load_explicit(&head->getNext(), std::memory_order_acquire);

        if (head == std::atomic_load_explicit(&m_Head, std::memory_order_acquire)) {
            if (head.get() == tail.get()) {
                if (next.get() == nullptr) {
                    return false;
                }
                std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak(&m_Tail, &tail, next);
            }
            else {
                dest = next->getValue();
                auto res = std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak(&m_Head, &head, next);
                if (res) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return true;
}
};

example usage that reproduces the problem :

int main(){
    ConcurrentQueue<int> queue;
    std::thread threads[4];

for (auto& thread : threads) {
    thread = std::thread([&queue] {

        for (auto i = 0; i < 100'000; i++) {
            queue.push(i);
            int y;
            queue.tryPop(y);
        }
    });
}

for (auto& thread : threads) {
    thread.join();
}
return 0;
}
  • 2
    I guess I count myself fortunate that my concurrency needs are always met by garden-variety mutexes, with well-defined semantics, and that I don't need to fool myself into sinking massive amounts of time on shaky, convoluted, "lock-free" alternatives, that, strangely enough, always end up implementing looping spinlocks that effectively block execution, just like an ordinary mutex would. – Sam Varshavchik Jun 29 '16 at 11:10
  • @SamVarshavchik I guess you are right, but it always good experimenting – David Haim Jun 29 '16 at 11:19
  • 1
    If you're going to implement something that is lock free, I suggest your standard implementation returns true for a call to std::atomic_is_lock_free( &ptr ) where ptr is some std::shared_ptr<> instance. – cr_oag Jun 29 '16 at 11:33
  • Just tried your code on coliru, it works fine.? – Mine Jun 29 '16 at 12:28
  • 2
    @SamVarshavchik. Your point is a misleading opinion. lock-free is required for high performance multi threaded code. All of our implementations were developed with no massive amounts of time spent on shaky convoluted code. Our $ cost savings in hardware were 100 times the cost of development. 10,000 times if you count customer retention. – johnnycrash Sep 5 '16 at 19:19
2

The problem is the race condition that can lead to every node in the queue waiting to be freed all at once - which is recursive and blows your stack.

If you change your test to use only one thread but don't pop, you get the same stack overflow error every time.

for (auto i = 1; i < 100000; i++) {
  queue.push(i);
  //int y;
  //queue.tryPop(y);
}

You need to unrecursive-ize deleting the chain of nodes:

__forceinline ~ConcurrentQueueNode() {
    if (!m_Next || m_Next.use_count() > 1)
        return;
    KillChainOfDeath();
}
void KillChainOfDeath() {
    auto pThis = this;
    std::shared_ptr<ConcurrentQueueNode> Next, Prev;
    while (1) {
        if (pThis->m_Next.use_count() > 1)
          break;
        Next.swap(pThis->m_Next); // unwire node
        Prev = NULL; // free previous node that we unwired in previous loop
        if (!(pThis = Next.get())) // move to next node
            break;
        Prev.swap(Next); // else Next.swap will free before unwire.
    }
}

I have never used shared_ptr before, so I don't know if there is a faster way to do this. Also, since I have never used shared_ptr before, i don't know if your algorithm will suffer from ABA issues. Unless there is something special in the shared_ptr implementation to prevent ABA I worry that previously freed nodes could be reused, spoofing CAS. I never seemed to have that problem though when I ran your code.

  • yep, it's a silly recursion that causes stack overflow.. – David Haim Oct 20 '16 at 8:24
  • I just realized i didn't put my full test code in here. Woops. – johnnycrash Oct 26 '16 at 16:53

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