1

The Problem

My co-worker and I have been trying to get some Scheme code working that will take input from a TSV file and assign those values to variables already defined in the Ansys software.


The Files

The TSV file is organized as follows:

1   0.7  0.8  0.7  1.0  0.5  [...]
2   0.9  0.9  0.3  0.5  0.5  [...]
3   0.5  0.8  0.3  0.3  0.7  [...]
4   0.6  0.2  1.0  0.5  0.5  [...]
5   0.9  0.0  0.0  0.8  0.3  [...]
6   0.5  0.6  0.3  0.4  1.0  [...]

[ ... ]

1998  0.5  0.0  0.2  0.9  0.0  [...]
1999  0.8  0.2  0.2  0.7  0.2  [...]
2000  0.7  0.2  0.8  0.4  0.5  [...]

The first column is the flow-time at which that particular set of inputs needs to be assigned to the variables in the software; the other 96 columns represent the 96 variables that need to be set.


The Scheme code that I have so far is this:

;Set variables
(define (setFunc)
    (lambda(row-position outflow-number flow-wt-1)
        (let outflow-string ((string-append("def bc outflow " outflow-number " ~a"))) 
            (if (< row-position 180)
                (ti-menu-load-string (format #f (outflow-string) flow-wt-1))
                (ti-menu-load-string (format #f (outflow-string) 0.0))
            )
        )
    )
)

;Read a file to a list of chars
(define (file->char_list)
    (call-with-input-file "doorstates.txt"
        (lambda(input-port)
            (let loop ((x (read-char input-port)))
                (if (not (eof-object? x))
                    (#t (begin (cons x (loop (read-char input-port)))))
                )
            )
        )
    )
)

;Main
(begin
    (let inFile ((apply string (file->char_list)))
        (let inFileList ((string-split (inFile #\newline)))
            (let index ((0))
                ; Row position = flow-time - 1
                (define rowPosition ((- flow-time 1)))
                (let loop ((index))
                    (cond ((>= index (length inFileList)) 
                            '()
                        )
                        ((= (- index (* (/ index 97) 97)) 0)
                            (+ index 1)
                            (loop (index))
                        )
                        ((= (/ index 97) rowPosition)
                            ; Column position = index - (rowPosition * rowLength)
                            (define colPosition ((- index (* rowPosition 97))))
                            (setFunc (rowPosition colPosition list-ref inFileList index))
                            (+ index 1)
                            (loop (index))
                        )
                        (else
                            (+ index 1)
                            (loop (index))
                        )
                    )
                )
            )
        )
    )
)

When the above code is run with the Ansys software it produces the following error:

Error: eval: unbound variable

Error Object: string

All the sources I've read have said that the most likely cause of an unbound variable is that extra parentheses were put around parameters that aren't functions (like literals); but everything I've seen has also had double parentheses around let arguments.


The Point

I had never worked with Scheme or any other LISP variation before being put on this project so if there are any errors or common practices I'm missing please let me know. Also if the above Scheme code is total crap and not doing what I need it to do please let me know and suggest next steps!

0

You are misinterpreting the error message. Your begin is missing a closing parenthesis. Thus, the end of file is encountered within the "list" starting with (begin .... Furthermore, you are using let incorrectly. You need to enclose the code that uses the variables, e.g.:

(let ((a 1))
  (+ a 7))

I suggest using an editor that understand s-expressions.

  • Thanks Michael! I've run into another error. Please see the edits above and weigh in if you have the time! – Kaelan Jun 30 '16 at 20:09
  • You are still using let incorrectly. In particular, (let inFile ((apply string ... is an attempt to define a named loop, redefining apply in the process. – Michael Vehrs Jul 1 '16 at 6:24

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