4

Background:

Often, we developers must check if a single variable is at least one of many options. For example,

if ( (data == 125) || (data == 500) || (data == 750) )
{
    /* ... do stuff ...*/
}

The suggestion here (albeit written in C#), provides an elegant solution to use a switch statement like so,

switch ( data )
{
    case 125:
    case 500:
    case 750:
        /* ... do stuff ...*/
        break;

    default:
        /* ... do nothing ... */
        break;
}

This works well for "or" conditionals, but is ugly for negated "or" conditionals like the following,

if ( !( (data == 125) || (data == 500) || (data == 750) ) )
{
    /* ... do stuff ...*/
}

which could be written as

switch ( data )
{
    case 125:
    case 500:
    case 750:
        /* ... do nothing ... */
        break;

    default:
        /* ... do stuff ...*/
        break;

}

and seems a bit hackish.

Question:

Is there a more succinct way to check if a single variable is none of many options, like the negated "or" conditional above?

References:

  • 2
    I rather like your last code example. It's very clear what is happening there. – Robert Harvey Jun 29 '16 at 15:53
  • 1
    Is it "hackish" just because the work is done after the default label rather than in the fall-throughs? I wouldn't agree. – unwind Jun 29 '16 at 15:53
  • With such questions as to what is "most" or "best", the best code style, best to maintain style, simplest source code, most portable, fastest, least source code, least executable code, least memory are competing factors. Being explicit in term of coding goals helps arrive at the best answer. "Most succinct" sounds like code golf which I am sure was not the intent. – chux Jun 29 '16 at 16:17
  • 1
    I like your second example more as well. Given you provide a "do nothing" comment in the "excludes cases" (which you didn't) it's very clear what is going on - Not the least bit of 'hackish' IMHO. – tofro Jun 29 '16 at 17:25
  • Thanks @tofro, I've added your suggestion to improve the question clarity. – Eric Schnipke Jun 29 '16 at 17:35
8

I think the latter is fine.

You can formalize it better, though:

static bool in_sprawling_set(int data)
{
  switch ( data )
  {
    case 125:
    case 500:
    case 750:
        return true;
  }
  return false;
}

and then where you want to do the work:

if(!in_sprawling_set(data))
{
  /* do the work, not in set */
}

This puts the "in set" logic in a function of its own, makes it mildly self-documenting, and the actual use-place much cleaner since the ! becomes more prominent and the final if is very readable ("if not in sprawling set").

Note: if the number of values is really large, I'd probably go for using a pre-sorted array and a binary search, rather than a huge switch. I realize a sufficiently clever compiler can do that transform by itself, but the readability of a huge switch would be rather low (especially if you like to put only one case per line). There's bsearch() for the searching:

static int cmp_int(const void *ap, const void *bp)
{
  const int a = *(const int *) ap, b = *(const int *) bp;
  return a < b ? -1 : a > b;
}

static bool in_sprawling_set(int data)
{
  static const int values[] = { 125, 500, 750 };
  return bsearch(&data, values, sizeof values / sizeof *values, sizeof *values, cmp_int) != 0;
}

There's quite a lot of boilerplate going on, but you can see how the part that lists the actual values (the only thing that'll grow as more values are added) is more compact.

  • Note, that by default GCC is warning about cases without break. – Eugene Sh. Jun 29 '16 at 15:57
  • 1
    @EugeneSh. Even if it ends with a return? Are you sure? – unwind Jun 29 '16 at 16:00
  • Umm.. Let me check. – Eugene Sh. Jun 29 '16 at 16:03
  • Yeah, you are right, it is not. Was referring to a related issue, when you want to fall-through after doing some case-specific job, like case A: doA(); case B: doB(); break; instead of case A: doAandB(); break; case B: doB(); break; – Eugene Sh. Jun 29 '16 at 16:09
  • Thanks for the response @unwind! I think your solution is very elegant and particularly like the way you expanded the idea to anticipate large comparison sets in your note at the end. Thanks, again! – Eric Schnipke Jun 29 '16 at 16:09
1

Instead of negating the condition, you can always use De-morgans laws to simplify the expression

if (data != 125 && data != 500 && data != 750) ...
-1

Is there a more succinct way to check if a single variable is none of many options?

The switch() statement is certainly a fine solution.

As an alternative, if the product does not over flow, code could use a single branch test:

unsigned data = foo();
if ( (data - 125) * (data - 500) * (data - 750) ) {
  /* ... do stuff as long as data is not 125, 500  or 750 ...*/
}

If it more clear - not really, Is it faster than switch()? it has potential.

  • Very interesting alternative @chux. This made me think more deeply about optimizing conditional speed and the implications for my project. Thanks for the response! – Eric Schnipke Jun 29 '16 at 16:18
  • What would be an advantage over the compare+or approach? I see none. Same number of terms and operators. In addition, the multiplication is not (necessarily) short-circuiting. – Eugene Sh. Jun 29 '16 at 16:22
  • @Eric Schnipke When speed is important, then one should also consider the set of typical values of data. Various approaches can be optimized to that set. Are 125,500,750 rare or common? I re-call bison as tool to make fast parsers – chux Jun 29 '16 at 16:23
  • @Eugene Sh. By " compare+or" I suppose you mean (data == 125) || (data == 500) || (data == 750) - that code can well cause multiple branches - this can be slow on pipelined processors. Same with (data == 125) | (data == 500) | (data == 750). On pipelined processors, lack of short-circuiting is often faster. As in previous comment, speed comparison are affected by the set distribution of `data. In the end - sometime a smart compiler will make optimal code given various source code. – chux Jun 29 '16 at 16:31
  • 1
    @chux OK, I see. Valid point. – Eugene Sh. Jun 29 '16 at 16:35

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